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8-BIT 
ATARI: 




n* IHH Wi MM inn 
- jggg ^gjip ^yjgn^ mmm 



iiimmmmimmimmtmm 



'74470"12728" 



05 




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CA. Orders / Information 415-352-3787 



No surcharge for VISA/MasterCard 
Yoyr card is not charged until we ship 



800 4 PIECE BOARD SET 

Includes Main Board, Power Supply 
Assembly, CPU Module and 10K 
Revision B Operating System Module. 
All boards are new, tested and complete 
with all components. $ r) o 50 



=28^ 



WORD PROCESSORS 

' Paperclip (Disk) $29.95 

■ AtariWriter (Cart.) $29.95 

' Bank Street Writer (D) . $17.50 

■ Cut & Paste (Disk) $17.50 

• Letter Wizard (Disk) . . . $17.50 



FLAT SERVICE RATES 

1050 DISK DRIVE $75.00 

810 DISK DRIVE $69.50 

850 INTERFACE $39.50 

800 COMPUTER $49.50 

1200XL COMPUTER $49.50 

Flat rates include Parts & Labor. 60 day 
warranty. Include $7.00 shipping & insurance 



800/400 MODULES 

NEW PARTS COMPLETE WITH IC'S 
cr. ■ CX853 16K Ram Module 
•^^ ■ 800 Main Board 

■800/400 CPU with GTIA 
■80010K"B"O.S.Modute 
■ 400 Main Board 
' 400 Power Supply Board 



$ 



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EACH 



800 Power Supply Board $14.50 
INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 

• CPU CO14806 

• POKEY C012294 

• PIA C014795 

• GTIA CO14805 

• ANTIC C012296 

• CPU CO10745 

• PIA CO10750 

•CPU C014377 

• DELAY C060472 

• 2600 TIA . . CO10444 

• PIA C012298 

• CPU 6507 

• PIA 6532 

• RAM 6810 

■CPU 6502B 



$^50 

EACH 



0061598 $20.00 
C061991 $15.00 
1050 Rom $19.50 
C061618 $20.00 



C021697 $15.00 
C025953 $9.50 
5713 .... $5.25 
C024947 $15.00 



1050 MECHANISM 

Factory fresh TANDON mechs. 
make difficult repairs a snap. Units 
are complete with Head, Stepper, 
Spindle motor, belt etc. Just plug in, 
no difficult alignments or adjust- 
ments requirecT $,A—7cr\ 



VISICALC 

SPREADSHEET 

Unleash the computing power * j 095 I 



of your 8 bit Atari withVisicalc. 
Compute everything from home 
finances to high powered finan- 
cial projectiorw. Hundreds of uses, 



DISK 



XL 40 PIN LSI CHIP SET 

A Complete set of 40 Pin Large 
Scale Integrated Circuits for your 
800XL, 600XL or 1200XL computer. 
Great for quick repairs! Set 
contains one eacii of the ^ _> ^-. ciC I 
following: CPU. GTIA, $"1k^'^' 
ANTIC, PIA AND POKEY. ' >-' 



REPAIR MANUALS 

SAMS Service Manuals for the 
following units contain schematics, 
parts listings, labelled photographs 
showing the location of 
checkpoints and more! A special 
section gives oscilloscope and 
logic probe readings allowing you 
to narrow the malfunction down to 
a specific chip or transistor! 
800, 800XL, 130XE, 400, 1025 

and 1050 $19.50 each 

520ST Service Manual. $37.50 

MISCELLANEOUS 

1027 INK ROLLER $6.50 

13 Pin Serial I/O Cable $5.95 

ACE Joystick $7.95 

Joystick Extension Cable 6' $5.00 

1050 Track Sensor $8.50 

2793 1050 Controller IC . . . $19.50 

U.S. Doubter $29.95 

SPARTA[X)S Tool-Kit . . . $32.95 
Paddle Controllers (Pair) . . . $6.50 
400 3 Piece Board Set ... . $19.50 

Fastchip for 800/400 $15.50 

Rambo XL w/o RAM IC's $39.95 
850 or PR IVtodem Cable . . $14.50 
850 or PR Printer Cable . , . $14.50 

Printer Interface $39.95 

I/0 13 Pin PC connector , . . $4.50 
I/O 13 Pin Cable end plug . . $4.50 
ST 6' Disk Drive Cable . . . $14.00 

ST Monitor Cable $22.95 

ST Monitor Cable connector $5.50 
ST Drive Cable plug end ... . $6.50 
^ ST to 5 1/4' t>ive Cable .... $23.95 



laK CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-551-9995 

IN CALIF. OR OUTSIDE U.S. 
CALL 415-352-3787 



TOWER PACKS 

Exact replacement trans- a . Acr\l 

former for 800/400. 1050 !}> I /I O U I 
810, 1200XL, 850, Xl=551 & I H 

1020 units. Part 00017945. 

XL/XE SUPPLY 

Power Pak for eOOXL,600XL $ O C 00 I 
130XE, 65XE & XE Game. "V^iyj^l 



THE BOOKEEPER 
AND CX85 KEYPAD 

You get both Atari's 8 bit _ 

professionai bookeeping $ "IQ^SI 
system and the handy CX85 ' ^ 
numeric keypad for one low 4 DISK 
price. Pacl<£^ies factory sealed. SET 



KEYBOARDS 

New and complete subassembly. 
Easy Internal replacement. 

130XE/65XE $35.00 

800 $40.00 

800X1 $29.50 

400 $12.50 



COMPUTER BOOKS 

Atari Playground Workbook $7.95 
HackerBook Tricks & Tips $5.00 

Inside Atari Basic $5.00 

Atari Basic Ref. manual. $5.00 
How to Atari 6502 Program $5.00 
Write Your Ovm Games. $5.00 
Programmers Ref. Guide $14.95 
Assembly Language Guide $21.95 
XE Users Handbook .... $21.95 
XL Users Handbook .... $21.95 
Advanced Programming $21.95 
Atari Basic Faster & Better $22.95 
Your Atari Computer $17.95 

SERIAL I/O CABLE 

High Quality, 13Pin $5.95 

MAC-65 CARTRIDGE 

6502 Machine language Macro- 
Assembler. First class tool for 
serious programmers. . . $59.95 

ATARI 850 INTERFACE 

Bare PC Board with parts list and 

crystal $7.50 

Board & all plug in IC's . . . $39.50 

PR: CONNECTION 

Serial/Parallel Interface for connecting 
modems and printers $65.00 

BASIC CARTRIDGE 

Exact replacement for 
800/400/ 1200XL $15.00 

EPROM CARTRIDGES 

16K Eprom Board with case. Specify 
dual 2764 or single 27128 style. Gold 
contacts $6.95 

ANIMATION STATION 

Graphics Design Tablet $74.95 



ICartridges for all 8 bit Atari computers 

Millipede Cartridge $10.00 

AtariWriter Cart $29.95 

Pac-Man Cartridge $4.00 

Deluxe Invaders Cart $4.00 

Journey to the Planets Cart. $4.00 

Donkey Kong Cart $5.00 

Crossfire Cartridge $7.50 

Springer Cartridge $7.50 

Turmoil Cartridge $7.50 

Fraction Fever Cart $9.50 

Alphabet Zoo Cart $9.50 

Linking Logic (Fisher-Price) $9.50 

FaceMaker Cart $9.50 

Delta Drawing Cart $9.50 

Choplifter Cart $10.00 

Adventure Creator Cart. . . $12.50 

Zone Ranger Cart $12.50 

Silicon Warrior Cart $12.50 

Math Encounter Cart $12.50 

Learning with Leeper Cart. $12.50 

Up For Grabs Cart $12.50 

PILOT Languid Package . . $17.50 

SPARTADOS-X Cart $59.95 

ACTION O.S.S $69.95 

MAC-65 O.S.S $59.95 

DISK SOFTWARE 

Paperclip $29.95 

Vislcalc Spreadsheet ... $19.95 

Bookeeper + CX85 Keypad $ 19.95 

Mission Asteroid Disk .... $4.00 

Fort Apocalypse Disk .... $5.00 

Spider Man Disk $5.00 

Human Torch & The Thing $5.00 

Musical Pilot Ed. Disk ... . $6.00 

Confutation Disk $6.00 

Debug Childware Disk ... . $5.00 

Crystal Raider Disk $5.00 

Dispatch Rider Disk $5.00 

Master Chess Disk $5.00 

Speed King Disk $5.00 

Last V-B Disk $5.00 

Chambers/Zorp Disk $5.00 

Pathfinder Disk $5.00 

Match Racer Disk $6.00 

Encounter/Ouestar Disk . . . $5.00 

Allen Ambush Disk $5.00 

NINJA $7.60 

Electra-Glide $7.50 

Wombats Adventure (D) $7.60 

Sports Spectacular Disk . . $7.50 

The Gambler Disk $7.60 

Stratos Disk $7.50 

Fun in Learning Disk ... . $7.50 

Fun in Numbers Disk .... $7.50 

Mind Mazes (Educational) $7.60 

Honey Craze Math (D) . . . $7.60 

Money Tools Utility (D) . . $9.96 

Dig Dug Disk $9.96 

Repton Disk $9.95 

Rear Guard Disk $9.96 

TechnaColor Dream .... $9.95 

Freaky Factory Disk .... $9.95 

Laser Hawk Disk $9.95 

Rocket Repairman Disk . $9.95 

Cest'e La Ve Disk $9.95 

Womper Stomper Disk . . $9.95 

Olln Emerald (Jr., Adv.) . . $9.95 

David's Midnight Magic Disk $12.50 

DropZone Disk $12.50 

Castle Wolfenstein Disk . . $12,50 

Beyond Castle Wolfenstein $12.50 

Allants Disk $12.50 

Mouse Quest Disk $12.50 

Electronic Drummer Disk $12.50 

Stock Market Game .... $12.50 

Pirates of the Bartiary Coast $12.50 

NIckerbocker Disk $12.60 

Midway Battles $14.95 

MoonMist Adventure (D) $14.95 

Mind Shadow (64K) $14.95 

Sea Stalker (D) $14.96 

Master Typing Tutor .... $16.00 

Bank Street Writer $17.50 

Cut & Paste W.P. Disk .. . $17.60 

SpartaDOS Const. Set . . . $39.50 

DATASOFT DISKS 

Zorro Disk $9.95 

Saracen Disk $9.96 

Gunslinger Disk XL/XE $9.95 

Crosscheck Disk $12.50 

Mercenary Disk $12.50 

The Goonies Disk $12.60 

Conan Disk $12.50 

Never Ending Story (64K) $12.50 

^221 Baker St. XUXE $17.50 . 



AMERICAN TECHNA-VISION 

I Mail Order: 15338 Inverness St., San Leandro, Ca. 94579 
Repair Center: 2098 Pike Ave., San Leandro, Ca. 94577 
Terms: NO MINIMUM ORDER. We accept money orders, personal checks or 
C.O.D.s. VISA, Master/Card ok^. Credit cards restricted to orders over $18.50. No 
personal checks on C.O.D. - Shipping: $4.00 shipping and handling on orders under 
$150.00. Add $2.75 for C.O.D. orders. In Canada total $6.00 for shipping and 

I handling. Foreign shipping extra. Calif, residents include 7% sales tax. All items 

I guaranteed 30 days from date of delivery. All sales final.. 

Pricee subject to change wlhout notice. Sand SASE fof tree price list. Atari is a reg. frad8marl< ol Attri Cap 




Irrational Computing: Page 22 




Space-Age Atari; Page 28 




Afific 

^^ ^^ The ATAPrRMniirre 



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FEATURES 



MAY 1989, VOL. 8, NO. 1 



2 1989 ANTIC AWARDS 

For outstanding Atarian achievement 

6 NEW 8-BIT POWER TOOLS reviewed by Matthew Ratcliff 
Quintopus!, XF551 Enhancer, Atari View 8 

16 ATARI BASIC ENHANCEMENTS by Paul Alhart 

Library of high-powered routines lype-in Software 42 

22 IRRATIONAL COMPUTING by Brian Siano 
"Koolc mail" database for fun and profit 

24 BUHERFINGERS by Kevin Gevatosky 

No more "Oops, I Hit [CLEAR]" blues 1)pe-in Software 45 

28 SPACE-AGE ATARI by George Lockard, NASA research, 8-bit style 

30 SIMMONS THERMAL RIBBONS by Thomas Simmons 

Ink your own and print better copies 

32 MIDIMAX reviewed by Jeffrey Summers, M.D., Affordable 8-bit MIDI 
choice 



DEPARTMENTS 



FEATURE APPLICATION 
10 VCR LABELER by Frank Walters 

Instant cassette title directories Type-in Software 41 

[b onus game] 

12 SECRET OF KYOBU Dl by Bernard Taylor 

Shogun death maze of old Japan type-in Software 46 

GAME OF THE MONTH 
14 CRIBBAGE ATARI by David Osborn 

Play without worrying about lost pegs Type-in Software 38 

[super disk bonus I 

18 COVOX COACH AND YAK-SPELL by Matthew Ratcliff 

Make your own talking programs that play back without hardware add-ons 

8-BIT PRODUCT REVIEWS 
36 Quest for Clues, Official Print Shop Handbook 

SOFTWARE LIBRARY 5 Easy-To-Type 8-Bit Listings 



37 TYPO II, SPECIAL ATARI CHARAOERS 



MIDI MAX: Page 32 



3 EDITORIAL 
5 I/O BOARD 
9 NEW PRODUCTS 



50 CLASSIFIED ADS 

51 ADVERTISERS INDEX 

52 TECH TIPS 



Antic— The Atari Resource (ISSN 0745-2527) is published monthly by Antic Publishing. Editorial offices arc located at 544 Second Street, San Francisco, CA 94107. ISSN 0745-2527. Second Class Postage 
paid at San Francisco. California and additional mailing offices. POSIMASTER; Send address change to Antic, The Auui Rcsouicc, P.O. Box 1569, Martinez, CA 94553. Subscriptions: One year (12 issues) 
S28. Canada and Mexico add S8, other foreign add S12. Disk Edition (12 issues with disks) S59.95, all foreign add «25. (California residents add 614 % sales tax for disk subscriptions. Editorial submis- 
sions should include text and program listings on disk and paper. Submissions will be returned if stamped, self-addrcssed mailer is supplied. Antic assumes no responsibility for unsolicited editorial 
material. No part of this publication mav be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwi.se. 
without the prior written permission of the publisher Antic is a registered trademark of Antic Publishing, Inc. An Information Technology Company Copyright ©1989 by Antic Publishing. All Rights 
Reserved. Printed in USA. 










,4* 



% 









ICD 

The March 1989 Antic cover fea- 
tured ICD's SpartaDOS X slugging it 
out with Atari's own DOS-XE for the 
new 8-bit operating system champi- 
onship. Despite many impressive 
strengths in the "official" Atari entry, 
our review concluded that third-party 
ICD's SpartaDOS X is the "ultimate" 
operating system for power users and 
hard disk owners. 

SpartaDOS X ($79.95) comes on a 
64k piggyback cartridge that's com- 
patible with the Atari 800 as well as 
the XL/XE models. The Antic review 
also described SpartaDOS X as "the 
most advanced product released for 
the 8-bit Atari since ICD's own Multi 
I/O interface" — which won ICD an 
Antic Award in 1987. 

1220 Rock Street, Rockford, IL 61101. 
(815) 968-2228. 




'^n Ac^ 



\^ 





For 
the 1989 

Antic 

Awards, 

this magazine 

is proud 

to honor 

two of 

the energetic, 

imaginative 

companies 

that continue 

to lead 

the way in 

creating 

breakthrough 

products 

for the 

8-bit Atari. 




INNOVAirVE CONCEPTS 

Innovative Concepts' Easy-Scan 
image scanner shared the Antic Oc- 
tober 1988 Cover with ICD's 8-bit/ST 
FA-ST hard disk. Easy-Scan ($79.95) 
uses a pair of fiber-optic light pipes 
to copy images from paper into your 
Atari's memory with a surprisingly ac- 
curate 256-level gray scale. 

Innovative Concepts has estab- 
lished a solid reputation as a small 
company with an extensive line of 
8-bit memory upgrades and related 
hardware enhancements. On the 
same day that these awards were be- 
ing prepared, a box arrived at Antic 
with Innovative Concepts' three latest 
products— RAMdrive + XE-GM2, a 
192K memory upgrade for the Atari 
XE Game System; RAM-Aid, a cold- 
start device for Ataris with at least 
128K; and the XF35 Kit which con- 
verts the Atari XF551 disk drive to a 
3.5-inch drive with 720K capacity. 

31172 Shawn Drive, Warren, Ml 48093. 
(313) 293-0730. 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



A^ic 



James Capparell 

Pitblisber 

John Taggart 

Associate Publisher 



EDITORIAL 

Not Friedland 

FMitor 

Charles Jacl(son 

Ticbnical ami Online Editor 

Carolyn Cushmon 

Assistant Editor 

Marta Deike 

Editorial Coordinator 

ART 

Kathleen McKeown 

Creatii'e Services Director 

Jim Warner 

Art Director 

Dwight Been 

Associate Art Director 

Marianne Dresser 

Desigti Production Assistant 

Georgia Solkov 

Pboto Editor ami Cover Photography 

Julianne Ososke 

Production Manager 

Kate Murphy 

Adivrlising Production Coordinator 

CIRCULATION 

Monny Sawit 
Director 

Amber Lewis 
Subscription Coordinator 

Dennis Swan 
Distribution Coordinator 

ADVERTISING 

(415) 957-0886 
Western Sales Representative 

Denny Riley 

Eastern Sales Representative 

Austin Holian 

Sales Coordinator 

Diane Van Arsdall 



ANTIC PUBLISHING, INC. 

James Capparell 

President and Chairman of the Board 

Donald F. Richard 

Richard D. Capparella 

Directors 

Lee Isgur 

Advisor to the Board 

John Taggart 

Vice President 

John Cady 

Controller 

GENERAL OFFICES 

(415)957-0886 

544 Second Street, San Francisco, CA 94107 

Credit Card Subscription and Cotalog Orders 
(800) 2J4-700I, Visa or MasterCard Only 

SUBSCRIPTION CUSTOMER SERVICE 

(415) 372-6002 
Antic, P.O. Box 1569, Martinez, CA 94553 



EDITORIAL 




ANTIC'S SEVENTH ANNIVERSARY 



With this anniversary issue, Antic completes seven flail years 
of publishing the bestselling magazine for Atari 8-bit com- 
puter users. Now as we enter our eighth year of continu- 
ous service to the 8-bit community, Antic is proud to still 
be one of the hardcore independent providers who have 
stuck by Atari users through good times and bad. 

The Atari 800, XL and XE continue to stand alone as the 
best 8-bit computers ever made. As changing market forces 
led to dwindling commercial support for the 8-bit line, Antic has tried to fill 
the gaps as much as our resources would allow. 

We have reactivated and expanded the Antic Arcade Catalog of 8-bit prod- 
ucts, bringing back many excellent commercial products that had been al- 
lowed to go out of print. 

On CompuServe's ANTIC ONLINE, we post many of our recent programs 
for your personal downloading, without any extra hourly surcharges. The 
ANTIC ONLINE INDEX gives you a high-powered database to look up any Antic 
article, review, or program from our seven years of publication. In fact, many of 
the complete articles and reviews are available in the Index for your 
downloading. 

Perhaps most significant of all is that the price of the monthly Antic Disk 
has been cut by nearly half of the original cost. Both sides of the Antic Disk 
are packed full of outstanding 8-bit software. Each month's disk features Super 
Disk Bonus programs that are too large and complex to be printed as type-in 
listings. 

Today's Antic Disk is an unbeatable Atari software value at $59.95 for 12 
issues of the magazine plus disk — only $5 apiece. You can subscribe — or up- 
grade your current non-disk subscription — by mail, or by phoning toll- free 
to the Antic Disk Desk at (800) 2 34-7001 with your Visa or MasterCard order. 
Single disks can also be ordered from the Antic Disk Desk for only $5.95 
(plus 82 for shipping and handling) and will be shipped to you within 24 hours 
after receiving your Visa or MasterCard order. Or mail a $5 95 check (plus 82 
shipping and handling) to Antic Disk Desk, 544 Second Street, San Francisco, 
CA 94107. And see the back-issues ad in this magazine for additional savings 
on the prior magazines and disks you need to complete your Antic Library. 
Let's keep working together for another year (Antic's eighth) of overcoming 
the nay-saying of those who want to write off the Atari 8-bit computers. We'll 
continue doing our part. It's important that you do your part by buying 8-bit 
products from the Arcade Catalog and subscribing to the Antic Disk. 



Nat Friedland 
Editor, Antic 



MAY 1989 




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CREATE single or ENHANCED density protection sctiemes (including PHAN- 
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NOTICE! If you already own a SUPER ARCHIVERI, you can upgrade to a SUPER 
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required). 

THE 

$69.95 "SUPER ARCHIVER'T $69.95 

(for ATARI 1050 drives) 

The new SUPER ARCHIVER, obsoletes all copying devices currently available 
for the ATARI 10501 It eliminates the need for Patches, PDB tiles. Computer 
Hardware, etc Copies are exact duplicates of originals and will run on any 
drive; without exaggeration, the SUPER ARCHIVER is the most powerful 
PROGRAMMING/COPYING device available for the 10501 Installation consists 
of a plug-In chip and 6 simple solder connections. Softwares included. 
Features are: 

• ARCHIVER/HAPPY ARCHIVER 
COMPATIBLE 

• BUILT-IN EDITOR - reads, writes, 
displays up to 35 sectors/track 
short 

• BUILT-IN CUSTOM FORMATTER 
up to 40 sectors/track 

• BUILT-IN DISASSEMBLER 

• BUILT-IN MAPPER - up to 42 sectors/ 
track 

• DISPLAYS/COPIES Double Density 
HEADERS 

• AUTOMATIC FORMAT LENGTH 
CORRECTION 

• SIMPLE INSTALLATION 

The SUPER ARCHIVER Is so POWERFUL that only programs we know that can't 
be copied are the newer ELECTRONIC ARTS and SYNFILE/SYNCALC (34 FULL 
sectors/track). If you want it ALL . . . buy the "BIT-WRITER"! also . . . then you'll 
be able to copy even these programs! Only $69.95 plus S4 S/H/l. 



• TRUE DOUBLE DENSITY 

• ULTRA-SPEED read/write 

• FULLY AUTOMATIC COPYING 

• SUPPORTS EXTRA MEMORY 

• SCREEN DUMP to printer 

• TOGGLE HEX/DEC DISPLAY 

• SECTOR orTRACK TRACING 

• AUTOMATIC DIAGNOSTICS 

• DISPLAYS HIDDEN PROTECTION 

• ADJUSTABLE/CUSTOM SKEWING 

• AUTOMATIC SPEED 
COMPENSATION 
AUTOMATIC/PROGRAMMABLE 
PHANTOM SECTOR MAKER 



$79.95 



"BIT-WRITER"! 



$79.95 



Ttie Super Aichiver "BITWRHBJ"! is capable of dupteaUng even ftie 'Xincopyabie" 
EA and SYN series which employ 34 FULL sectors/tracks. "BIT-WRITER"! is 
capable of reproducing these and FUTURE protection schemes of non 
physicially damaged disks. PLUG-IN circuit boards and 4 simple solder 
connections. The "SUPER ARCHIVER with "BIT-WRITER"! Is the ultimate 
PROGRAMMING/COPYING device for Atari 1050's EXACT DUPLICATES of 
originals are made! Copies run on ANY drive. Must be used with Super 
Archlver. Only $79.95 plus $4 S/H/l. 



$69.95 



"ULTRA SPEED PLUS" 



$69.95 



Imagine a universal XL/XE Operating System so easy to use that anyone 
can operate it instantly, yet so versatile and powerful ttiat every Hacker, 
Programmer and Ramdisk owner will wonder tiow ttiey ever got along 
without it! Ultra Speed Plus puts unbelievable speed and convenience at 
your fingertips. Use ANY DOS to place an ULTRA SPEED format on your disks, 
boot any drive (1-9) upon power-up format your RAMDISK in Double Density, 
activate a built-in 400/800 OS for software compatibility, plus dozens of other 
features too numerous to mention! Below ore just a FEW features you'll find 
in the amazing OS: 



' ULTRA Speed SIO tor most 

modified drives 
' ULTRA Speed is toggieabie 
■ Boot directly from RAMDiSK 
' Special timer circuits not re- 
quired tor ■! or 2 Meg upgrades 
' Background colors ad|ustble 
' Reverse use ol OPTION key 
' Cold-start without memory loss 
• Built-in floppy/disk configuration 
editor (1-9) 



• Built in RAMDiSK configura- 
tion editor (1-9) 

• RAMDISK exactly duplicates 
floppy drive so sector copy- 
ing and sector editing are 
now possible 

• Built in MiNI Sector Copier 

• Toagie SCREEN OFF for up to 
40% Increase of processing 
speed. 

• Toggle Internal BASIC 



■ Ram resident disk loader 

grogram (MACH 10 menu) 
OUBLE DENSITY RAMDISK 
capable 

• Entire MEMORY test that pin- 
points defective RAM chip 

• Boot any drive (1-9) upon 
power-up or cold-start 

• Supports memory upgrades 
up to TWO MEGABYTES 

" THREE Operating Systems In 
one (XL/XE, 400/800, ULTRA 
SPEED PLUS) 



$29.95 



"XF551 ENHANCER!" 



$29.95 



The XF55'1 Atari drive Is a fine product with one ma)or flaw.. .it writes to side 
TWO of your flopping disks BACKWARDS. This causes read/write 
incompallbility problems with all other single sides drives made for Atari 
such as Indus. Trak, Rana, Percom, Astra, Atari 1050, Atari 810, etc. Add the 
XF551 ENHANCER to the new XF551 drive and your problems are over! This 
device will restore 100% compatibility while retaining original design 
qualities ol Atari's super new drive. The XF551 ENHANCER is a MUST for all 
XF551 Owners. Installation is simple. Only S29.95 plus S4 S/H/l. 



DEALER/DISTRIBUTOR/USER GROUP Discount availalbe call lor info. 

PHONE Orders - MASTER CARD, VISA MAIL - Money Orders, Checks 

•SHIPPINGI Add S4 for ShipplnglHandilng/insurance within the U.S.A. 

UPS BLUE LABLE (2nd DAY AIR) available for S3 extra per shipment. 

CALL TODAY! (716) 467-9326 CO(i4PUTEI? SOFTWARE SERVICES 

9 am - 5 pm (EST) WEEKDAYS P.O. Box 17660 

Rochester, N.Y. 14617 



A 

ATARI" 



$39.95 RICHMAN'S $39.95 

80 Column Word-Processor! 

Easy to use, very powerful, and NO ADDITIONAL HARDWARE required! 
Works with TV or Monitor! This "DISK ONLY" 80 Column Word-Processor is 
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• 80 COLUMNS ON THE SCREEN! 
One expert has compared 40 domestic and foreign word-processors 
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Insert and Delete 
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Memory Statistics 
Alternate Output 
Change screen Colors, 
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Mouse compatible 



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THE "QUINTOPUS!" 



$39.95 



The "QUINTOPUS!" Is an inexpensive device that provides a tremendous 
amount of convenience while eliminating the problems associated with 
the endless "daisy-chaining" of peripherals (eg: drives, interfaces, printers, 
modems, cassettes, etc.). The "QUINTOPUS!" is an I/O port expander that 
converts a single I/O output/input into five additional outputs/inputs Instead 
of daisy-chaining all of your peripherals (which often times results in passing 
a signal through 30 feet or more of cablel), the "QUINTOPUS!" allows each 
device to be connected directly to the computers through only three or 
four feet of cable. This Is particularly useful when attempting to use 
ULTRASPEED or WARPSPEED data transfer rates. The "QUINTOPUSI" also 
provides the "extra" I/O ports often needed to connect devices not having 
daisy-chaining capabilities. Coble resistance and compocitance are 
greatly reduced thereby significantly improving the opportunity of 
accurate data transfers! Only S39.95 plus S4 S/H/l. 

$59.95 THE "QUINTOPUS!" $59.95 

(with SWITCHABLE PORTS!) 

This Deluxe version of the "QUINTOPUS!" has all of the above features with 
the additional benefits of two SWITCHABLE PORTS! This means you con 
connect two computers to one printer or two printers to one computer; you 
can switch in a computer/printer combination and while you're printing 
out a long document, switch in a second computer to access a modem, 
disk drive, cassette deck, etcl Switch multiple combinations of peripherals 
or computers without the hassel or re-arranging I/O cables .... simply flip 
a switchl Only $59.95 plus $4 S/H/l. 



LIMITED SPECIALS! 



Previously we listed these products under our FIRESALE ad but many of our 
customers feared that the software Items might be smoke or water 
damaged. They're NOTl All of the items listed below are BRAND NEW.. .only 
their literature or pocking may have slight cosmetic Imperfections All items 
are fully warrantledl Quantities are limited! No ralnchecksl 



1. PILL (without case) 

2. SUPER PILL (without case) 

3. XL FIX ROM 

4. ULTRA MENU/DOS 

5. DISKORACKER (Newest version) 

6. ELECTRONIC PHANTOM SECTOR MAKER DELUXE 

7. RICHMANS 80 COLUMN WORD PROCESSOR 

8. MIRACLE (Disk only Version of Impossible) 

9. IMPOSSIBLE for 800 or 800XL 

10. XL MATE 

11. COMPACTOR 

12. KLONE 11 (Generic HAPPY backup) 

13. SILENCER 

14. BLACK PATCH (MASTER) 

15. BLACK PATCH DATA DISKS 1 & 2 

■Order 5 Items or more and we will pay the freightl 

These SPECIALS are lor C.S.S. customers only - NO DEALER DISCOUNTS - NO RAINCHECKS 

- LIMITED QUANTITIES 





LIMITED 


NORMALLY 


SPECIALS 


S70 


$19 


80 


22 


70 


19 


30 


19 


50 


19 


60 


35 


60 


29 


70 


19 


ISO 


69 


30 


15 


30 


15 


100 


75 


30 


19 


SO 


25 


20 


10 



I/O BOARD 



BRILLIANT MISTAKE 

In my article on Atari Brain Transplants 
(Antic, November 1988) I offered to send 
a copy of the Public Domain 800 Upgrade 
by David Byrd to anyone who sent me a 
self-addressed, stamped envelope. 

Unfortunately, there was an error in the 
initial mailing. A reader, Elmo Fei^son, 
pointed out the error. I have since sent cor- 
rections to all the readers who requested 
information, and all future mailings will 
be correct. I apologize for any incon- 
venience to the readers. Incidentally, I 
mailed out over 80 copies of the upgrade 
during 1988. 

Lee Brilliant, M.D, 
Granada Hills, CA. 

Readers interested in this upgrade should 
send a self-addressed, stamped envelope 
to Eh: Brilliant c/o Antic Magazine, 544 
Second Street, San Francisco, CA 
S>4107.-ANJ\C ED 



VARIABLE SPEED 

Lately I notice that quite a few BASIC pro- 
grammers replace commonly used cons- 
tants with variables (CI, C2, etc.) claim- 
ing that it increases execution speed. This 
is incorrect. Such a practice can save sub- 
stantial amounts of memory in large pro- 
grams, but actually causes them to run 
slightly slower. A simple timing loop wUI 
verify this. I just wanted to set the record 
straight — keep those 8-bit programs 
coming! 

James Hague 
Richardson, TX 

Antic Technical Editor Charles Jackson 
checked this out. He wrote a simple BA- 
SIC program that performed many 
mathematical computations. One ver- 
sion used variables. The second version 
used constants and ran about 0.12 per- 
cent faster Another problem with using 
variables is that they can make a pro- 
gram very hard to follow, unless descrip- 
tive variable names are used. 
-ANTIC ED 



FLOPPED FLOPPIES? 

I think I have several bad disks. Could you 
publish a disk checker or tell me where 
I could buy one? The disks in question are 
all 3M DS, DD, RH soft sector, and the box 
says "for use with standard IBM PC/XT." 
Are these the correct disks for my system? 
Mel Walker 
Philadelphia, PA 

The Antic Arcade Catalog carries two 
programs that can help. If you have an 
Atari 1050 drive, try Sherlock 1050 
(APO 155, $19). Otherwise, use Disk 
Scanner (APO 145, $15.95). 

Basically, any 5 'A inch floppy disk 
should work with your system, but you 
must format the disk, first. Boot with 
a disk that has DOS on it, and type [DOS] 
to go to the DOS menu. (Any Antic 
Monthly Disk has DOS on it. Simply 
choose selection Ifrom the main menu.) 

Be sure to remove your DOS disk be- 
fore formatting and insert the disk to be 
formatted. Formatting will permanently 
destroy all the data already on the disk, 
so be careful! Type [I] to format the disk, 
and follow the prompts. It's also a good 
idea to Write DOS Files to Disk after for- 
matting (option H). If you don't get any 
error messages in the process, your disks 
should, be O/ST. -ANTIC ED 



FAILING MEMORY? 

My 800XL seems to be suffering loss of 
memory. The Memory Test shows that I 
have 8K of RAM missing. I don't think I 
can RUN or even LOAD software requir- 
ing 48K. Is there a way to recover that lost 
RAM, or does my computer need ser- 
vicing? 

Gregory Pogonowski 
Rancho Santa 
Margarita, CA 

No, your 800XL is fine. Wur XL's built- 
in BASIC is using that 8K of memory. The 
next time you use the computer, try this: 
First, unplug your disk drives from the 
computer (DOS takes up a certain 
amount of space, too). Next, hold down 



the [OPTION] key (this disables BASIC) 
and turn on your Atari. Run the Mem- 
ory Test again and watch that 8K 
reappear! 

As you might guess, many commercial 
programs should be booted with [OP- 
TION] held down, to free that memory 
and disable BASIC for programs that 
don't need jY. —ANTIC ED 



^STEREO" AMP 

The Antic Music Processor (December 
1988 Super Disk Bonus) is truly one of the 
most addictive computer programs I have 
worked with. 

To hear my songs with a little more fi- 
delity, I used a coaxial cable to attach my 
Atari 800XL to my stereo-equipped VCR. 
The audio signal from my VCR goes to my 
stereo amplifier. The result was a very 
satisfying psuedo-stereo sound and I was 
able to make cassette recordings of the 
songs directly from my tape deck. 

Now, my only wish is for a way to play 
a "Musical Revue" of all the song files on 
a disk. 

David Warren 
Poway, CA 

It would be great to have a way to play 
all the songs on a disk, or even to loop 
songs to play over and over We'll add this 
to the list of good ideas we're passing on 
to Steven Lashower, the program's author. 
-ANTIC ED 



Antic welcomes your feedback, but 
we regret that the large volume of mail 
makes it impossible for the Editors to 
reply to everyone. Although we do 
respond to as much reader correspon- 
dence as time permits, our highest pri- 
ority must be to publish I/O answers 
to questions that are meaningful to a 
substantial number of readers. 

Send letters to: Antic I/O Board, 
544 Second Street, San Francisco, 
CA 94107. 



MAY 1989 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



New 8-Bit Pbwer Tools 



Quintopus!, XF551 Enhancer, Atari View 8, Review by Matthew Ratcliff 



QUINTOPUSILETS ME CONNECT MY TWO ATARI COMPUTERS TO THE SAME SET OF PERIPHERALS 



QUINTOPUS! 

Quintopus! is an SIO port ex- 
pander for Atari 8-bit computers. It 
provides up to six (Computer Soft- 
ware Services added an extra port, but 
didn't change the name) SIO ports for 
attaching disk drives, modem or 
printer interfaces, or even multiple 
computers. Using Quintopus! can 
minimize cable tangles, improve data 
transfer reliability and even deliver a 
simple, but functional, "multi-user" 
environment. 

If you have more than two "dead 
end" devices in your system, such as 
an Atari XM301 modem and ICD's 
Printer Connection, for example, ca- 
ble juggling can be a real hassle. 

Quintopus! eliminates this problem. 
It can be connected directly to your 
Atari computer, and all other peripher- 
als may then be attached to the other 
ports on the Quintopus!. If you have 
more than five peripherals, they can 
be daisy-chained in the usual manner. 

Cormecting your system this way 
wLU shorten the total cable length be- 
tween your computer and each pe- 
ripheral. This can improve the relia- 
bility of communications between the 
devices and computer, since there are 
fewer linkages and less "voltage drop" 
along the way. 

This is especially useful for such 
devices as the Atari XM301 modem 
and ICD's Printer Connection, which 
also get their power from the com- 
puter. Ideally, they should be the first 
devices in the "daisy chain" of periph- 



erals, for the most reliable operation. 
Quintopus! makes this possible. 

I reviewed the switchable version 
of Quintopus!, which provides some 
"multi-user" capabilities. This model 
has two toggle switches and two as- 
sociated connectors, marked with 
white dots. The most obvious appli- 
cation is to cormect an Atari computer 
to each switched port. When the as- 
sociated switch is on, that computer 
has full access to the disk drives, 
modem, printer and other devices 
you may have attached. 

You can have both toggle switches 
on at the same time, although this isn't 
recommended. Everything will work 
fine, until both users try to access a 
peripheral at the same time (and it 
need not be the same peripheral). Nei- 
ther computer is "aware" of the 
other's presence, and each assumes it 
has total control of the Atari bus. 
When two computers try to write to 
the same disk at the same time, it's a 
sure bet your data will be scrambled. 

It might have been better if the 
switchable version had a double-pole, 
double-throw switch, which would 
insure that any time one port is 
switched on, the other is switched 
off. This would prevent any acciden- 
tal conflicts with peripherals. 

As it is, users sharing their systems 
can best avoid problems by employ- 
ing "manual handshaking," where 
one user asks the other for access to 
the peripherals, switches the other's 
computer off, switches his on, and 



then goes to work. Ideally, each 
would use RAMdisks for the majority 
of his work, switching the Quintopus! 
into gear only at backup time. 

Quintopus! is also useful in situa- 
tions where you frequently switch be- 
tween two like peripherals, such as 
printers. An Atari 1027 letter-quality 
printer may be attached to one port, 
for printing those formal letters and 
reports. The other switched port 
could provide access to your work- 
horse dot-matrix printer 

When turning off one computer in 
a dual-computer setup. It's wise to dis- 
connect that computer at the Quin- 
topus! switch. If the other computer 
is on and both switches are enabled, 
the first computer will continue to 
draw power from the bus. This isn't 
good for either computer, and is best 
avoided. 

Aaually, I can't think of any reason 
why you'd want both switchable 
ports on at the same time. If both 
ports are needed at the same time, 
then no switching is required. In that 
case, the less expensive version of the 
Quintopus! best applies. 

The Quintopus! consists of a small 
circuit board, not much larger than a 
3x5 inch index card. It contains a few 
components to handle the switching 
of the ports, a pair of toggle switches, 
and the six Atari SIO bus connectors. 
It's not pretty, since it isn't housed in 
a case. Computer Software Services 
said a case would have added about 
seven dollars to the final cost. They 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



decided to provide tlie most product 
at the lowest price, so the case was 
eliminated. 

I have no complaints about the lack 
of a case. If you do, you can buy a 
plastic project box from any Radio 
Shack, providing for an enjoyable eve- 
ning of drilling, cutting, filing and fit- 
ting your own custom Quintopus! 
package. Of course, it will be mostly 
holes, to accommodate all the con- 
nectors. 



The Quintopus! lets me comiect my 
Atari XEGS and 800XL to the same set 
of peripherals. The XEGS video out- 
put is connected to the front of my 
Commodore 1702 monitor, the 
800XL to the rear I can easily put the 
XEGS to work backing up floppies or 
growing fractal curves, and then flip 
the monitor and Quintopus! switches 
to the 800XL. Then I can get back to 
work with MAC/65 and the ICD MIO 
RAM disks and FA-ST hard drive on 



that next software project for Antic. 
Though not the most sophisticated 
form of "multi-tasking" available, the 
Quintopus! still delivers an elegant, af- 
fordable solution to an age-old 
problem — putting multiple com- 
puters to work with only one set of 
peripherals. 

$39.95, switchable version $59.95. Com- 
puter Software Services, P.O. Box 17660, 
Rochester, NY 14617. (716) 467-9326. 



WITH THE ENHANCER, YOUR XF551 CAN CREATE SIMILAR "FLIPPIES" OR STANDARD DOUBLE-SIDED DISKS. 



XF551 ENHANCER 

The XF551 Enhancer is a very 
useful hardware modification for the 
Atari XF551 disk drive. Very useful, 
and very confusingly advertised. 

According to the Computer Soft- 
ware Services ad for the Enhancer, 
Atari's XF551 drive "is a fine product 
with one major flaw ... it writes to 
side TWO of your floppy disks BACK- 
WARDS. This causes read/write in- 
compatibility problems with all other 
single sided drives made for Atari". 
These statements are not quite 
correct! 

For years, Atarians have been mak- 
ing what we call double-sided disks 
on our 810 and 1050 drives. This is 
done by notching the opposite side 
of the disk, flipping it over, and for- 
matting the reverse side of the disk. 
Each side of this disk has its own sep- 
arate directory, and each side is logi- 
cally considered to be a separate disk. 

The proper term for such a disk is 
"flippy", since you must flip the disk 
over to access side two. 

The Atari XF551 has two readAvrite 
heads, top and bottom. When a disk 
is formatted Double Sided, Double 
Density by Atari DOS-XE, SpartaDOS, 
or MYDOS, it is a single disk, logically 
as well as physically, with only one 
direaory which charts BOTH sides of 
the disk. 

What's the difference, you ask? 
Well, there's no more disk-flipping. 



You can access a full 360K of data 
(both sides) without turning the disk 
over! The DOS and second disk head 
make access to side two of the disk 
completely transparent. 

It is true that side two of this disk 
is written in the opposite direction, 
relative to side one, but you couldn't 
use this disk as a flippy anyway, since 
there is no directory information on 
the second side. Assuming it was writ- 
ten in the "same direction" as the flip 
side of a flippy, there would still be 
no reasonable way to access the data. 

Users have been making flippies for 
so long that Atari built some "protec- 
tion" into the new XF551 drive mech- 
anism. To prevent accidental format- 
ting of the second side of a disk which 
is already double-sided, the XF551 
refuses to format the back side of a 
flippy disk — even if it is notched. 

The idea is to break a bad habit and 
protect your data. It is a good idea, 
but can also be annoying. 

The XF551 can read and write to 
the flip side of flippy disks as long as 
they are formatted elsewhere (on a 
1050 or 810 for example). 

The XF551 Enhancer defeats the 
XF55rs format proteaion, letting you 
either create flippy disks, or the "true 
standard" double-sided disks, at the 
flip of a switch. The reality is that 
there are far more 1050 and 810 drives 
out there than XF551s. To exchange 
data with these other systems, or with 



other single-sided drives in your own 
system(s) in the most disk-efficient 
manner, you need the XF551 En- 
hancer. 

The Enhancer consists of a small, 
solid black module (which encases 
some electronics), a toggle switch, 
and seven wires that must be con- 
nected to various points in the drive 
mechanism and circuit board. One 
jumper must be cut and soldered. 
There are no pins to desolder and pull 
up, and no etch to cut. This makes in- 
stallation pretty simple and straight- 
forward. 

The l6-step instruction sequence is 
very nicely detailed, accompanied by 
a hand-drawn reference schematic. I 
found no need to look at the 
schematic, since the written instruc- 
tions were so well prepared. 

With proper lighting, soldering 
equipment and related tools, this in- 
stallation should take an experienced 
"solder jockey" less than a half hour. 
With care, a novice who knows how 
to wield a soldering iron with the 
proper attention to all details should 
be able to complete the job in about 
an hour 

You must remember that any hard- 
ware modifications to the XF551 will 
void its Atari warranty. Therefore, it 
is best left pristine until the 90 day 
warranty has expired. (Antic takes no 
responsibility for the results of any 
hardware modifications.) 



There are no ON/OFF indicators on 
the switch itself. With the switch in 
the direction of the "black wire," you 
can format the flip side of any disk, 
with or without a write-enable notch. 
In the opposite direction, the flip side 
of your disks are protected from ac- 
cidental formatting, just as originally 
designed by Atari. 

I wrote "FLIPPY" and "NORMAL" 
on opposite sides of a disk label, at- 
tached it to the rear of the drive above 
the drive select switches, drilled a 1/4" 
hole between the two words, and 
mounted the switch as prescribed in 
the documentation. Before locking 
down the nut, I made certain that the 
black wire was facing the "FLIPPY" 
side of the label. Some double-backed 
tape, provided on the XF551 En- 



hancer, made it a snap to attach the 
small black cube to the metal bracket 
just inside the rear of the drive. 

The disk worked fine the very first 
time. DOS was able to format the flip 
side of a disk, without a write-enable 
notch cut in the disk. Reading and 
writing was no problem after that. But 
I strongly recommend notching the 
flip sides of flippy disks. That way you 
are much less likely to confuse your 
double-sided and flippy disks. Also, 
a notched flippy allows writing to the 
back side of the disk without having 
the XF551 Enhancer enabled. It's wise 
to keep the Enhancer off at all times, 
except when formatting a fUppy. 

The XF551 Enhancer lets you cre- 
ate flippy disks in the same manner 
as the 1050 or 810, with the added 



feature of being able to override write- 
protect tabs. This facilitates the ex- 
change of more data on fewer floppy 
disks, using 1050, 810, Rana, Indus, 
and other Atari compatible drives. 

I'm very pleased with the perfor- 
mance of the Enhancer. Since I have 
a 1050, and most of my friends still 
use them as their main drive, I must 
be able to format and duplicate flippy 
format disks easily, and the Enhancer 
lets me get the job done on my XF551. 
Now that I have the Enhancer in- 
stalled, I'm ready to retire my old 
1050 and add a second XF551 to my 
8-bit arsenal. 

$29.95. Computer Software Services, 
P.O. Box 17660 Rochester, NY 14617. 
(716) 467-9326. 



LOAD AND DISPLAY A WHOLE NEW WORLD OF COMPUSERVE GIF PICTURE FILES ON YOUR 8-BIT ATARI. 



ATARI VIEW 8 

Atari Vie^v 8 is a shareware prod- 
uct written and distributed by Don 
Davis. It is a utility for viewing pic- 
tures stored in CompuServe's GIF 
(Graphics Interchange Format). 

GIF is a graphics file format devel- 
oped and trademarked by Compu- 
Serve. It is a "device independent" 
standard that provides a method for 
transferring graphics from one com- 
puter to another. The various picture 
forums on CompuServe provide 
many visuals in this graphics standard. 

Atari View 8, Version 2.0 is a share- 
ware utility that lets you load and dis- 
play a GIF file in your 8-bit Atari. It 
also lets you zoom in or out on any 
portion of the image. If you like what 
you see, the program can also save the 
current display in Micropainter 
format. 

When you have logged onto 
CompuServe, type GO QUICKPICS to 
find some of the files best suited for 
viewing on the 8-bit Atari. There are 
16 libraries to choose from. Here all 
files are 20,000 bytes or smaller, with 
a resolution of no more than 640 X 



200 pixels, and 16 colors at most. 

I've gotten best results with 320 X 
200 graphics in either two or four 
colors, especially digitized images. 

When you go looking for these files 
on CompuServe, make certain that 
they are GIF format and not the older 
.RLE (run length encoded) format. 
The correct filenames will have .GIF 
extenders. 

I managed to find a GIF version of 
"Stoneage," by Darrell Anderson of 
Colorado Springs. He was the DEGAS 
art contest winner in Antic, July, 
1986. However, the original Atari ST 
image loses something in "transla- 
tion" when viewed on the 8-bit with 
Atari View. The color mapping didn't 
work well, and no matter how much 
I zoomed in on the image it was diffi- 
cult to recognize its content. 

The documentation warns of such 
problems and provides advice on 
proper GIF selections. The original 
Stoneage was 640 X 200 pixels, in 4 
colors. Atari View does a very good 
job with most two-color and four- 
color images, regardless of size. 

Once you have downloaded some 



GIF files from CompuServe or other 
bulletin board systems, you can put 
Atari View to work displaying them. 
And then you can convert them to a 
format for customizing with your 
favorit paint soflrware. There are many 
"clip-art" files in the graphics forums 
of CompuServe that could potentially 
be used with Print Shop, Newsroom, 
or the applications from Hi-Tech Ex- 
pressions. If you want to convert your 
graphics to other formats. Rapid 
Graphics Converter hy Charles Jack- 
son (Antic, November 1985) will let 
you convert your Micropainter (.MIC) 
files into uncompressed Micro Illus- 
trator format, the format used by a 
wide variety of graphics products, 
Graphics Shop ($19.95, Antic Arcade 
Catalog API56) will handle conver- 
sions to Print Shop format, and News- 
room Converter (Antic, December 
1988) converts images into News- 
room file format. 

Atari View takes its color data from 
the GIF file header and does not al- 
low you to adjust it. This is the only 
aimoying limitation of the program. 
The documentation advises you to 



8 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



adjust your display if the colors don't 
appear correctly. A sample color bar 
file is provided for use as a reference 
in these adjustments. This doesn't ac- 
count for personal tastes. No matter 
how well Atari View might match the 
original colors, personal interpreta- 
tions are somewhat subjective and 
should be adjustable. 

Also, the user may specify a default 
drive, but Atari View always looks at 
Drive 1 for its "help file," not on the 
default drive. The directory function 
and filename input are two separate 
commands, so you can't view a list of 
GIF files while typing a filename. All 
user-friendly software should allow 
you to see a list of files at the same 
time that your input is being accepted. 

These are only minor gripes about 
an otherwise exemplary program. 
Atari View performs all other func- 
tions very well. The commands are 
straightforward, [R] to read a GIF pic- 
ture, and [W] to write a Micropainter 
file. 



The most useful commands are 
[V]ertical, [Hjorizontal, and [S]ize 
scaling of an image. They are a little 
quirky to use at first, requiring that 
you adjust vertical and horizontal 
scaling down, using keyboard con- 
trols, before moving a pair of sizing 
boxes to select a zoom area. It would 
have been more elegant to allow 
joystick selection of these parameters. 
Atari View will even allow you to 
zoom out, or shrink an image on the 
display. 

You can achieve very good results 
by adjusting the color [T]hreshold 
and the zoom area of an image. I 
found a two-color digitized image of 
Chuck Berry that looked pretty sharp 
on my PC display. On the Atari 8-bit 
it looked pretty sad when viewing the 
entire picture. I adjusted the width 
and height, then selected just the up- 
per body and guitar to zoom in on. 
The result was excellent, and I pressed 
the [W] key to write the picture to 
disk. 



Atari View 8 opens up a whole new 
world of graphics for your Atari 8-bit 
computer No matter how large or 
complex the image, so long as the GIF 
picture fits on one disk. Atari View 
will show it to you. It isn't practical 
for viewing pictures with more than 
four colors, in most cases. But by 
zooming in on bits and pieces of a 
very large image, you can get a very 
good idea of what it contains. 

I hope that future upgrades to the 
Atari View package will include a sep- 
arate printing utility for creating hard 
copies of some of these excellent 
graphics. Atari View 8 is available for 
downloading from CompuServe's 8- 
bit Atari forum (type GO ATARI8), or 
may be ordered by mail from the au- 
thor. It's an excellent product for the 
price. 

$20 shareware contribution requested. 
Don Davis, 50 W. Holly Hill Road, Apt. 
13, Thomasville, NC 27360. (919) 
475-2627. 



NEW PRODUCTS 



DARKSTAR PLUS, 
CLEARINGHOUSE, 
LOnO WHEELER 

(applications software) 
F/22 Press 
PO Box 141 
Leonia, NJ 07605 
(201) 568-6250 



DarkStar ($64.95) is designed to solve 
all of the exposure and filtration prob- 
lems normally encountered in the pho- 
tographic darkroom. Among the eleven 
different types of problems it can solve 
are print density, magnification, lens 
opening, neutral density, color balance, 
filter factors, emulsion batch, b&w pa- 
per grade and type. TimeStar (824.95) 
allows you to program as many as 15 
sequenced events, each lasting up to 
100 minutes. Audible warnings, and 
automatic or manual starting of peri- 
ods are provided. Both DarkStar and 
TimeStar can automatically operate the 
Omega D5500 enlarger; the two are 



available combined in a single program 
called DarkStar Plus (889.95). 

Without accessing any on-line data- 
bases, ClearingHouse (849. 95) can 
help businesses detect bad checks. Re- 
quiring only a minute or two per 
check, the program runs through a se- 
ries of 20 questions that catch 95% of 
invalid checks, according to the folks 
at F/22 Press — without requiring ex- 
pensive telecommunications 
equipment. 

For those less cautious with their 
money, F/22 also produces WIN, a 
program designed to pick favored 
numbers to win any type of Lotto or 
lottery, even exotic games like New 
York's 10-number Keno. WIN is sold 
for outright purchase at a price of 
899. 95; if the buyer promises to pay 
F/22 Press one-percent of everything 
over the first 8100,000 won with the 
program, the price is only 819.95. For 
the scientific lotto player, LOTTO 
WHEELER 2.0 (824.95) uses "wheel- 
ing" systems popularized by mathema- 



tician Ivan Dimitrov to skew the odds 
towards the player. 

PRINT 'N STAC2 ^^^^h 

(printer stand) 

Suncom 

290 Palatine Road 

WheeUng, IL 60090 

(312) 459-8000 

819.99 

The Print 'n Stac2 combines an ac- 
cessory paper tray with Suncom's two- 
piece PrinterMate universal printer 
stand. Separately, the two pieces retail 
for 825.98. 



New Products notices are compiled by 
the Antic staff from information 
provided by the products' manufac- 
turers. Antic welcomes such submis- 
sions, but assumes no responsibility 
for the accuracy of these notices or the 
performance of the products listed. 



I Ijpe-lii Software 



FEATURE APPLICATION 



VCR Labeler 

Instant cassette title directories. By Frank Walters 



KIHIHX3BHBESniCaKPK2iIt!B3KE1IXn^ 



RUTHLES5 PEOPLE 0000 

1149 

HOHAItO THE DUCK 2S71 



SinginQ in 
■the Rani n , 



2750 
1:50 






P 



rint labels 

for your VCR cassettes 
with this simple BASIC program. 
It works on any 8-bit Atari computer with at least 48K 

memory and a printer. 
Printer drivers for five 
different printers are 
included, along with instructions for making your own. 



Afn-a.2:cDni WcDme^n 
On The Mc3on 



0000 
1:45 



c3-f Hc3r-r-c3t^s 



0000 



VCR Labeler is a simple BASIC pro- 
gram that makes videocassette labels 
out of standard 3 1/2x15/16 inch 
printer labels (such as Avery #4145 
labels). 

Each label has room for as many as 
three titles, along with the VCR 
coimter number and running time in 
hours and minutes (h:mm). 

If you have more than three titles 
on a cassette, make two labels — they 



will fit on the edge of VHS box. You'll 
have to trim the left edges to fit two 
labels on a Beta box. 

GEniNG STARTED 

Type in Listing 1, VCRLABEL.BAS, 
check it with TYPO II and be sure to 
SAVE a copy before you RUN it. 

When RUN, VCR Labeler will ask 
you to select the type of printer you'll 
be using. If your printer isn't listed, 



try the other drivers to see if any of 
them wUl work correctly with your 
printer. Otherwise, follow the direc- 
tions below for creating your own 
printer driver. 

PRINTING LABELS 

It's a good idea to put the labels in 
the printer before entering label infor- 
mation. That way, you'll be ready to 
print as soon as you've entered the in- 



10 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



formation. 

The progtam first asks for the num- 
ber of titles for that label (1-3). This 
number determines the line spacing 
of the label. You can enter 3, even if 
you only have 1 title, leaving room on 
the label for more. That vray, you can 
enter the VCR counter for the start of 
the next blank section. 

The program then asks for the first 
title. For each title, there is room for 
16 characters on each of 2 lines. The 
program will display two lines with 
a space between them. Type your ti- 
tle on the lines, but don't type a let- 
ter over the space. Simply space over 
it and begin the second line. Use the 
cursor keys to edit your line, then, 
when everything looks correct, press 
[RETURN] . The program will split tlie 
text into two lines and ignore the 
space between them. 

Next, type the starting counter 
number of that program. Legal entries 
arc 0-9999, or press [RETURN] for 
0000. The program drops decimals 
and puts entries in four-digit form au- 
tomatically. 

Finally, enter the duration of the 
program — one digit for the hours, 
and two digits for the minutes. Use 
a space or colon to separate hours and 
minutes. For example, the program 
will accept either 1:30 or 1 30 as en- 
tries. [RETURN] will give the default 
time of 0:00. If the program is less 
than an hour, type a for the hour 
value. 

After information for each title has 
been entered, the label will be dis- 
played on the screen. If necessary, you 
can re-type that section to correct any 
errors. 

After entering the information for 
all the programs on the label, just fol- 
low the prompts to print it. You may 
wish to make the first label a 3-title 
entry, to check the spacing on the la- 
bel when you print. There is an op- 
tion to reprint a label if you have to 
adjust the labels in the printer Once 
the triple entry label is centered, all 
following labels should be properly 
spaced, automatically. 



CREATING YOUR OWN 
PRINTER DRIVER 

If your printer is not supported, 
change line 5 to: 
5 TYPE = 6 

This selects the OTHER PRINTER 
subroutine, located in lines 4600- 
4680. You'll need to know a little bit 
about BASIC programming to take the 
necessary printer control codes from 
your printer manual and place them 
into VCR Labeler 

The program stores the printer con- 
trol codes in string variables. 

WIDEi!, for example, contains the 
instructions to set your printer's char- 
acter width (called "pitch") to 12 
characters per inch (sometimes called 
"elite"), then sets your printer to 
double-width, or expanded print. 
Since expanded print is twice as wide 
as normal print, we'll get half as many 
characters per inch — 6 cpi. 

Most printer manuals give printer 
control codes in decimal. After find- 
ing the printer code, you'll have to 
convert it to a character string before 
you can add it to the program. 

Here's an example. According to the 
Star SG-10/15 manual, the code used 
to set the print pitch to elite (12 cpi) 
is: 27, 66, 2. 

Referring to an ASCII chart, we see 
that 27 is the ASCII code for the [ESC] 
character, 66 is the ASCII code for the 
letter "B" and 2 is the ASCII code for 
a [CONTROL] [B] character 

Continuing on in the manual, we 
find the code used to set the printer 
to expanded print is: 27, 87, 1. 

Returning to our ASCII chart, we 
see that 27 is the ASCII code for the 
[ESC] character, 87 is the ASCII code 
for the letter W and 1 is the ASCII 
code for a [CONTROL] [A] character. 
When you finally place these con- 
trol codes into a string, they look like 
this: 

wiDE$ = "eBaeM[B" 

Note that this matches line 4310, 
which defines the SG-10/15 printer 
code for WIDES. 



Follow this method to create the 
rest of the printer control code 
strings, listed below: 

WIDES — Double-width characters 
for 12 cpi, giving six double-width 
characters per inch. See above for a 
complete explanation. 

WIDEOFFS— Change back to 12 
cpi. 

BOLD S— Near Letter Quality, or 
your best looking double-strike or 
emphasized font (must stay at 12 cpi). 

P66$ — Code for standard 6 
lines/inch or 66 lines per page. This 
determines the spacing between lines, 
not the form feed value. 

P88S— Set 8 lines per inch or 88 
lines per page. 

UONS— Turn underline ON. 

UOFFS— Turn underline OFF 

Up to four characters can be in- 
serted. If you need more, put them in 
and re-DIMension the appropriate 
string in lines 1000 to 1020. 

If your codes use less than four 
characters, you must remove any of 
the extra little hearts from your 
strings. These hearts represent nulls 
(ASCII 0) and do nothing. However, 
if you don't have a double strike or 
NLQ mode, leave at least one hean in 
the BOLD$, so it won't send a car- 
riage return. 

Once your TYPE is set and the 
printer codes are determined, remem- 
ber to DELETE line 4605 of your 
subroutine, which is a trap to prevent 
that subroutine from being acciden- 
tally selected. 

If you get tired of entering your 
printer type every time you RUN the 
program, put that number in place of 
the in line 5 . From then on the pro- 
gram will skip the printer setup when- 
ever you RUN it. 

Finally, be sure to SAVE your modi- 
fied VCRLABEL program before you 
RUN it. A 

Frank Walters has had work published in 
Computer Shopper and Compute!. His 
lazy Loader appeared in the May 1985 
issue of Antic 

Listing on page 41 



11 



I "type-In Softivare 



BONUS GAME 



SECRET OF 



Kyobu Di 



Shogun death maze of old Japan. By Bernard Taylor 



Return to medieval Japan in this exciting 
game of treacherous mazes and hidden treasures. 
This sequel to The Seven Skulls is a BASIC program 

that works on S-bit Atari computers with 
at least 48K memory, disk or cassette. 



Ever since you became the Shogun 
of Japan with the help of the Princess 
Tknuki {We Seven Skulls, Antic, 
October 1988), things have been 
going from bad to worse. Someone 
has been systematically stealing the 
Sacred Treasures of Japan, including 
the Pearl of Wisdom, the Golden Hel- 
met of Truth, the Sacred Sword of Jus- 
tice and the All-Seeing Ruby-Eye of 
the Great Buddha. The Emperor has 
given you the task of recovering those 
national treasures. 

Even more important, the beauti- 
ful Lady Tanuki was recently kid- 
napped and is being held for ransom 
at the castle of Kyobu Di, the warrior 
monk. 

After a fierce battle, your army 
stormed the castle only to discover 
that the evil monk took Lady Tanuki 
to a secret chamber far beneath the 
castle. Lighting a torch, you and six 
of your bravest samurai enter the un- 
derground maze that separates you 
from Kyobu Di. . . 




GEHING STARTED 

Type in Listing 1, SHOGUN. BAS, 
check it with TYPO II and be sure to 
SAVE a copy before you RUN it. Antic 
Disk owners will find SHOGUN.BAS 
on the monthly disk. 

If you have trouble typing the spe- 
cial characters in lines 305-310, 1105, 
1150-1160, 1226-1236, 1254 and 
31000, don't type those lines. Instead, 
type Listing 2, check it wih TYPO II 
and SAVE a copy. When you RUN List- 
ing 2, it creates these hard-to-type 
lines and stores them in a file called 
LINES. LST (or to a separate cassette). 



To merge the two programs, disk 
users LOAD "D: SHOGUN. BAS" and 
then ENTER "D:LINES.LST." Cassette 
users: CLOAD Listing 1, then insert 
the separate cassette used for Listing 
2 and ENTER "C:". Remember to 
SAVE the completed program before 
you RUN it. 

MAZE OF DEATH 

Your position in the maze is 
represented by the torch you are car- 
rying. The torch bums oil which must 
be replenished from time to time. 

Yellow jars of oil can be found at 
various spots in the maze. Touching 
a jar with your torch will relight the 
torch if it has gone out or add oil to 
a dwindling supply. The amount of 
time left before the torch goes out is 
displayed at the bottom left comer of 
your screen. 

If necessary, the torch can be extin- 
guished by pushing the fire button on 
your joystick. 

To reach the secret hiding place of 



12 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



Kyobu Di you must first pass through 
a large sinister maze. The stone walls 
of the maze contain numerous one- 
way doors that let you climb up or 
down, but only in one direction. 
These doors have been cleverly hid- 
den so you will have to knock on the 
walls with your torch to find them. 
Finding a hidden door automatically 
moves you to the other side of the 
wall. 

Scattered around the maze are land 
mines and trip wires. These obstacles 



If your 

torch goes out 

you'U be "left 

in the dark" 

indeed! 



can be seen and easily dealt with (or 
avoided) as long as your torch remains 
lit. If the torch goes out you'll be "left 
in the dark" as to their exact locations. 
A dangerous situation, indeed! 

Stepping on a land mine results in 
instant death to one of your rescue 
party. 

Crossing a trip wire tells Kyobu Di 
your location in the maze and he will 
try to kill you by throwing a battle ax, 
spear, or shuriken (pointed-star). He 
may even shoot an arrow at you. Al- 
though Kyobu Di has been known to 
miss with the spear, he is most profi- 
cient with all other weapons. So as 
soon as you hear the "twang" of a trip 
wire, move quickly to a spot where 
you will be out of the path of Kyobu 
Di's weapons. 

You begin the game with seven 
men. Each time you step on a mine 
or get hit by a weapon, you lose a 
man. A skull will be added to the bot- 
tom of the screen to signify your loss. 
Colleaing seven skulls (deja vu, huh?) 



ends the game. 

TREASURES 

Also in the maze are keys and iron 
chests. Keys are collected by touch- 
ing them with your torch. 

The different-colored chests can be 
opened only by touching them with 
the torch, but only while you possess 
a key of the same color as the chest. 

Some chests are empty. Others con- 
tain items you may find useful during 
your journey through the maze. Un- 
used keys and any other items found 
are displayed at the bottom of your 
screen. 

FINAL MAZE 

As you near the secret hiding place 
of Kyobu Di, you will find no mines 
or trip wires. You are now close 
enough for Kyobu Di to see the light 
from your torch and he will react ac- 
cordingly. 

The Final Maze also contains new 
hidden doors which let you pass 
through walls to the left or right. 

At the beginning of each game you 
may choose how, or where, the keys 
will be placed in the maze. Press [OP- 
TION] to place some of the keys in 
new random locations. Press the 
[SPACEBAR] to put all keys in the same 
locations each time the game is 
played. The challenge of Random 
Keys should be attempted only after 
you have become familiar with all 
aspects of the game. 

You are now ready to match wits 
with the warrior monk. Local vil- 
lagers have planned a fireworks 
celebration in your honor in the un- 
likely event that you successfully res- 
cue the Lady Tanuki. 

A final warning! Kyobu Di is a mas- 
ter of cuiming and deceit. Many 
deadly surprises await those who act 
rashly or fail to unravel the Secret of 
Kyobu Di! A 

Bernard Taylor is a bulk mailing special- 
ist from Roseville, California. This is his 
second appearance in Antia 

Listing on page 46 



i^//1 



Don't forget us! 



ANTIC, P.O. BOX 1569 
MARTINEZ, CA 94553 

n lam also a start subscriber. 

New 
Address 



Name 



Address 



City 



State 



Zip 



I lype-ht Software 



GAME OF THE MONTH 



Cribbage Atari 

Play the game without worrying about lost pegs. By David Osborn 



Cribbage Atari is a fast, clear version 
of the popular card game. Pitting one 
player against the computer, it's also 
an easy way for beginning players to 
learn the scoring and strategy of crib- 
bage, before getting out the pegboard 
and challenging human opponents. 

Written entirely in BASIC, the 
graphics are kept simple enough that 
the play is at least as fast as the aver- 
age human opponent. The cards are 
displayed by rank and suit, instead of 
with miniature pictures of cards. 

All modesty aside, I believe most 
players will find Cribbage Atari a 
worthy opponent. 

GEniNG STARTED 

Type in Listing 1, CRIBBAGE.BAS, 
check it with TYPO II and be sure to 
SAVE a copy before you RUN it. This 
is a long listing, but it's not at all tricky 
to type. 

To play the game, just follow the 
onscreen instructions. The program 
first displays the title and starts setting 
up the character set. Setting up takes 
some time, so to keep you from get- 
ting too bored the program will inter- 
rupt itself to ask you questions. 

The first question lets you set the 
speed of play. Beginners and first 
timers should try a setting of [5], so 
they have time to follow the scoring. 

Next the program asks whether you 
want to use a joystick or the arrow 
keys. Type a [K] to use the keyboard, 
or a [J] to use the joystick. 



iwmwmmmmmmmwmmmmmwmmmtmmmwm 

M Y <:■ hRDS 


= = = = 


:n 


7V 8* 9V IDV 






YOI.IR OmRDJ 






2* 2* 2* K* 


JTftRTER 




THE ORIE 


8* 




;:A» 4* ; 4V:;li:i* 






YOUR iCORE 35 MY :' 


■Ml 42 




15 FOR 2 




:j 




.*>• 



Now you can play the classic card 
game cribbage without needing 
to worry about finding the cribbage 
board — or remembering just how 
the scoring goes. Cribbage Atari is 
a fast BASIC program that works on 
any Atari 8-bit computer with at least 
48K memory, disk or cassette. 



If you use the joystick, move the 
selector arrow with the stick and 
press the button to signify your 
choices. 

If you use the keyboard, use the ar- 
row keys to move the cursor (you do 
not need to press [CONTROL].) Use 
the [INSERT] key to make your 



selections. 

Once the play screen comes up, 
you're dealt six cards. The program 
displays the suits in black and red, 
with numbers and letters indicating 
rank. When adding card values to- 
gether, each card is worth its face 
value. Aces count as one, all face cards 



14 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



count as ten. 

THE CRIB 

The first thing you must do is pick 
two cards for the crib. (You have to 
wait for the computer to take its turn 
first.) The cards you select are placed 
face down in the area marked either 
YOUR CRIB or MY CRIB. If you acci- 
dently choose the wrong first card, 
choose the space where that card was 
and your hand will be redisplayed so 
you may choose again. Once both 
cards are chosen — well, a card laid is 
a card played. 



The 
computer does 

the scoring, 

telling you each 

time what 

the points 

are for. 



The cards in the crib become a sec- 
ond hand that either you or the com- 
puter plays for points. When it's 
YOUR CRIB, you discard the cards 
that will be most likely give you 
points, while keeping as many points 
as possible in your hand. 

When the computer says it's MY 
CRIB, you try to get rid of useless 
cards that won't help the computer. 

Once you have selected your crib 
cards, the STARTER card is revealed, 
and you're ready to play. 

POINT SCORING 

There are two ways to get points in 
cribbage. Certain combinations of 
cards in your hand are automatically 
worth points — pairs, runs, flushes, 
and combinations of 15 (an eight and 



a seven, a five and a ten, and so on.) 

The starter card is counted as a part 
of your hand. If you have the jack of 
the same suit as the starter card, you 
also get one point for "nobs." 

The other way to get points is 
through game play. The player who 
doesn't get the crib plays first. If the 
computer plays a 10, and you follow 
with a five, you get two points for 
making a total of 15. If the computer 
then plays a five, it gets two points for 
a pair. Runs of three or more consecu- 
tive cards (a two, three and four, for 
example) also count. A total of 31 gets 
two points. 

If one player can't play in turn with- 
out putting the total over 31, the other 
player gets to "go" until also unable 
to play. One point is awarded for the 
last card played, and the total returns 
to zero. 

As soon as all the cards have been 
played, it's time to count up all the 
points in each hand. 

If all this sounds confusing, don't 
worry — the computer does all the 
scoring for you, telling you each time 
what the points are for Arrows point 
to the cards involved, and a message 
flashes at the bottom of the screen, 
such as "PAIR FOR 2" or "15 FOR 2". 
It's an excellent way for beginners to 
learn the scoring system. (Experi- 
enced players will probably want to 
speed up the game at the first screen, 
since they don't have to worry about 
following the scoring.) 

When playing with cards, cribbage 
scores are kept on pegboards. The 
computer simulates this by showing 
rows of pegs onscreen, one peg for 
each point. The screen's perimeter al- 
lows only 60 peg spaces, so the com- 
puter will lap the perimeter twice, for 
one game of 121 points. A 



David Osbom of Bismarck, North 
Dakota has a B.S. in mathematics and 
enjoys games of all kinds, especially 
strategy. This is his first appearance in 
Antic. 

Listing on page 38 



COMING NEXT 

IN 

JUNE 1989 ANTIC 



Animate any Print Shop icon! 



Super Locator 
finds text fast 



AUTORUN Selector 
gives you boot-up ctioices 



2 -Column Printing From BASIC 



Antic Music Processor 
SONG CONTEST WINNERS 



HAVE A QUESTION 

ABOUT YOUR 

SUBSCRIPTION? 

Get an answer fast! 

Call 
(415) 372-6002 

Write: 

Antic Customer Service 

P.O. 60x1569 

Martinez CA 94553 




15 



I TJ/K-Zn Softuare 



Atari BASIC 




TARI BASIC ENHANCEMENTS 



IS A COLLECTION OF VERY 



USEFUL ROUTINES THAT CAN BE USED FROM 



t 



BASIC— WITHOUT TOUCHING YOUR 

PROGRAM IN MEMORY. THESE 

SHORT BASIC PROGRAMS 

WILL WORK ON 8-BIT 

ATARIS WITH AT LEAST 

32K MEMORY AND 

DISK DRIVE. 



There I was sitting at my Atari at 3 
a.m. trying to save my just-completed 
masterpiece. I kept getting an ERROR 
162 (whatever that means) no matter 
how many times I tried. I had left my 
BASIC Reference Manual at a friend's 
house, so I couldn't even look it up. 

As my fingers danced across the 
keyboard typing the word DOS, I got 
a bad feeling, and stopped. What if 
there was no MEM.SAV on this disk? 
All my work would be lost. Now 
what? 1 grabbed for a fresh disk, only 
to find that I had none that were for- 
matted. No formatted disks, ERROR 



16 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



Library of high-powered routines. 



162, and not able to go to DOS. What 
to do? 

ENTER (pun intended) my Atari BA- 
SIC Enhancements. 

With these BASIC Enhancements I 
could look up that error code, delete 
unnecessary files, and more. All with- 
out leaving BASIC, and more impor- 
tant, without affecting one line of my 
precious program. 

Now the world was assured of an- 
other great 8-bit program and I was 
able to get some sleep. 

BASIC ENHANCEMENTS 

Atari BASIC Enhancements is a col- 
lection of useful routines that help 
you get the most from Atari BASIC. 

Unlike a BASIC wedge or other Ex- 
tended BASICS, the enhancements 
will work with any 8-bit Atari and 
Atari BASIC Rev. A, B, C or compati- 
ble BASICS. 

Each enhancement file consists of 
a collection of BASIC statements 
which have no line numbers. Since 
there are no line numbers, the BASIC 
statements are executed Immediately. 

For example, the LOCK Enhance- 
ment will lock a given disk file. Here's 
what the LOCK Enhancement file 
looks like: 

CLOSE #1:CLR :DIM Z$(18):? 
"Which File to LOCK?" 

? " Ex. D2:DATA.EXE":INPUT 
#16, ZS:? "Locking ";ZiS:XIO 
35,#1,0,0,Z« 

You could just as well have typed 
these lines in immediate mode, but 
keeping these commands in a single 
file is much more convenient. 

The Enhancements use no program 
memory and don't touch Page 6. Any 
program in memory is untouched and 
can be LISTed or RUN as soon as the 
BASIC "READY" prompt is restored. 

Written for Atari DOS 2 users, most 
of the Enhancements should also 
work with any compatible DOS. 



Known exceptions are noted in each 
Enhancement's description. But the 
routines automatically test for com- 
patibility before they begin, just in 
case. 

GEniNG STARTED 

Type in listing 1, ENHANCE.BAS, 
check it with TYPO II and SAVE a 
copy to disk. Have a second disk 
ready, freshly formatted with DOS 2 
and with the file DOS.SYS on it. 
When you RUN "DiENHANCE.BAS", 
the program will bring up a menu. 

You can choose which enhance- 
ments you want written to the disk, 
each as a separate file. Antic Disk 
owners will find all the enhancements 
already on this month's disk. 

The BASIC Enhancements on this 
disk are all ENTERed from BASIC in 
the Immediate Mode by typing EN- 
TER "D:FILENAME" and then follow- 
ing the screen prompts. 

Copy any or aU of them to your 
work disk or RAMdisk, to eliminate 
disk swapping. The Enhancements 
will run faster from a RAMdisk. Drives 
1 — 8 are supported. For proper oper- 
ation, do not rename the Enhance- 
ments "HEX," "DEC," or "ERROR." 
Following are descriptions of each 
Enhancement. 

THE ENHANCEMENTS 

BINLOAD: DOS 2 equivalent "L" 
Binary LOAD. Load and Run any ma- 
chine language program that can be 
run with BASIC instaUed. NOTE: For 
use only with DOS 2 or DOS 2.5 

DEC: DOS 2 equivalent— None. 
Decimal to Hexadecimal conversion. 

HEX: DOS 2 equivalent— None. 
Hexadecimal to Decimal Conversion. 
The decimal and hexadecimal files 
work together Both are written to 
your disk at the same time. 

DELETE: DOS 2 equivalent "D" 
Deletes a FILE. 



DIR: DOS 2 equivalent "A" Disk 
Directory. This Enhancement will al- 
ways end with an ERROR 136. This 
is normal and may be disregarded. 
NOTE: when using DOS 2.5, file- 
names shown in <brackets> use sec- 
tors above 720 and are not available 
to DOS 2. 

DRIVES: DOS 2 equivalent— None. 
Examine/Set which Disk Drives DOS 
will support. NOTE: Modifies 
DOS.SYS. 

ERROR: DOS 2 equivalent— None. 
Gives an English translation of Error 
Codes. 

ERROR. 164: DOS 2 equivalent— 
None. Enable/Disable ERROR 164 
handling by DOS. NOTE: Modifies 
DOS.SYS. Not Compatible with DOS 
2.5 

LOCK: DOS 2 equivalent "F" Lock 
FUe. 

OPENFILE: DOS 2 equivalent— 
None. Examine/Set number of File 
Buffers. (Number of Files that can be 
OPENed at the same time). NOTE: 
Modifies DOS.SYS. 

RENAME: DOS 2 equivalent "E" 
Rename File. 

UNLOCK: DOS 2 equivalent "G" 
Unlock File. 

WRITEDOS: DOS 2 equivalent "H" 
Write DOS Files. NOTE: Only 
DOS.SYS is written. Use whenever 
DOS has been modified and you want 
to make the changes permanent. A 

ANTIC ED: If you want to make a 
MEM.SAV without going to DOS, the com- 
mand to do it is: 

OPEN #1,8,0,"D:MEM.SAV":CLOSE #1 

Paul Alhart of Lompoc, California is an 
Electronics Technician in the aerospace 
industry, and an active member of his 
local users group, the Atari Federation. 
His Tech Tip DefaultWriter Pius appeared 
in the July 1988 issue of Antic. 

Listing on page 42 



17 



SUPER DISK BONUS 



Make your own talking programs that 




Covox Coach and Yak-Spell 



This month's Super Disk 
Bonus shows you how to 
add true digitized speech 
and sounds to any program you write. 
The May 1989 Antic Disk brings you 
a double-feature by Matthew Rat- 
cliff — a stand-alone talking program 
called Yak-Spell, plus the Covox 
Coach tutorial that enables you to cre- 
ate your own talking programs with 
the SJ49.95 Covox Voice Master Junior 
You can use Yak-Spell even if you 
don't have the Voice Master Junior 
You'll find it on the Side B of this 
month's Antic Disk as YAKSPELL.BAS, 
along with the speech and spelling 
files that it needs. 

GEniNG STARTED 

Just RUN "DYAKSPELL.BAS" and 
you'll see a list of available spelling 
files. Type in the name of the file you 
want to use. You don't need to type 
the .SPK extender Yak-Spell will quiz 
you — in Matt Ratcliff s own voice. 



By Matthew Ratcliff 



If you own the Covox Voice Mas- 
ter Junior you can create your own 
Yak-Spell speech fUes. Later in this ar- 
ticle we'll explain how to do this, us- 
ing the Yak-Spell Builder, 
SPLBLD.BAS, also found on your 
Antic monthly disk.. 

Yak-Spell prompts you for the drive 
where the dictionary files are located 
(matching speech files are expected to 
be on the same disk). A directory of 
all the spelling files is then listed. You 
only need to type the name of the les- 
son to study, such as ANIMALS from 
this month's Antic Disk. The spelling 
and speech files are loaded into mem- 
ory, the main screen of the program 
is displayed and the first word is 
spoken. 

At the top of the display is the pro- 
gram title, followed by the name of 
the lesson now under way. Below this 
is a line indicating the number of the 
word to be spelled and the total words 
in the quiz. At the bottom of the dis- 



play is a box with information about 
special keys that Yak-Spell under- 
stands. 

Press the asterisk key [ * ] to hear a 
word spoken again, as often as desired 
with no penalty. Pressing the [ES- 
CAPE] key will display a series of 
dashes (-) below the word line, one 
"blank" for each letter which has not 
been spelled. If the current problem 
has multiple words, the spaces will be 
shown as underline (_) characters. 
These spaces must be typed in the 
correct position by pressing the 
[SPACEBAR]. Near the center of the 
screen is a question mark (?), where 
the actual spelling takes place. 

To spell the word, simply type it 
out. If you are really stumped, press- 
ing the question mark key [SHIFT] [/] 
will coax the next correct letter out 
of Yak-Spell. However, this is the same 
as misspelling the word! Pressing [ES- 
CAPE] to get "blanks assistance" 
comes with no penalty, but results in 



18 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RE.SOURCE 



play back without hardware add-ons. 




a warning at the end of the lesson. 

If you make a typing mistake, the 
"try again" phrase will be spoken and 
the error logged. For each correct key 
press, a pleasant "ding" is heard, un- 
til the word is completed. If the word 
was spelled correctly, Yak-Spell will 
say you are "correct" and move on to 
the next word. 

After all words have been spelled, 
a percentage score is computed and 
displayed, along with a letter grade 
and rating. You are then prompted to 
quit or practice some more. If you 
continue, you can study the same les- 
son again, or select a new one. 

Your May 1989 Antic Disk- 
featuring the talking double-bonus 
Yak-Spell and Covox Coach — as well 
as every type-in program from this 
issue — will be shipped to you within 
24 hours after receiving your order 
Just phone Toil-Free to the Antic Disk 
Desk at (800) 234-7001. The 
monthly disk is only $5.95 (plus $2 
for shipping and handling) on your 
Visa or MasterCard. Or mail a $5. 95 
check (plus $2 shipping and handling) 
to Antic Disk Desk, 544 Second 
Street, San Francisco, CA 94107. 

TALKING SOFTWARE 

The Covox Voice Master Junior 
($4995) is a magnificent educational 
tool. With it, you can add true digi- 
tized voice and sounds to any pro- 



7 = ortp 

eiC - IHOU SLANK'S 

■• : Rcpcar MORO 



gram. Covox Inc. is at 675-D Conger 
Street, Eugene, OR 97402. (503) 
342-1271. 

This coaching session will help you 
create your own talking programs. 
We'll use Yak-Spell as a demonstra- 
tion. There are two steps in develop- 
ing talking software. First, you must 
write a program which uses the 
Covox software and hardware to cre- 
ate your speech files. 

Second, you must write another 
program to read these speech files and 
"speak" them to the user This should 
be a "stand-alone" program — it 
should not need any Covox hardware. 
Any Atari owner should be able to 
RUN and hear your program. 

Covox provides excellent subrou- 
tines for controlling the Voice Master 
Junior These make it a snap to create 
speech files. With their PLAY utility, 
you can easily create your own stand- 
alone talking programs. 

There is one significant limitation 



with the PLAY utility, however It 
alvrays loads speech data files to the 
same location, 16384 ($4000), right 
in the middle of BASIC memory. This 
leaves only five or six kilobytes of 
main memory for your own program. 
This is too inflexible for any serious 
talking software. 

So for more flexibility I wrote an 
assembly language USR routine which 
loads a speech file into a BASIC string. 
BASIC will manage the string's loca- 
tion in memory, keeping it clear of 
your program (and giving you one less 
detail to worry about). Now, you can 
control the amount of memory allo- 
cated for speech data. 

For example, Yak-Spell uses a 
12,000 byte buffer for speech data. 
This buffer wiU hold about 20 words, 
leaving another 20K of RAM for your 
program. That's about four times 
more RAM than the original Covox 
load-and-play utility gives you. 

RECORDING SPEECH 

You'll need the Covox Voice Mas- 
ter Junior hardware and software to 
record your own speech files. To write 
a speech builder program, you must 
first RUN "D:VM800" from the Voice 
Master Junior program disk. This in- 
stalls the VM.800 handler, letting your 
Atari LEARN, SPEAK, and SSAVE 
words. For Yak-Spell, 1 first wrote 
SPLBLD.BAS, the program that creates 



MAY 1989 



19 



the speech files. 

Next, load SPLBLD.BAS from this 
month's disk. SPLBLD.BAS must be 
RUN with the VM.800 Covox Voice 
Master handler installed! When RUN, 
SPLBLD.BAS asks you to plug a 
joystick into port 1, and to plug the 
Voice Master Junior microphone into 
port 2. It also asks if VM800 has been 
RUN. Next, SPLBLD.BAS asks you to 
type in the number of the drive on 
which the speech files will be saved. 

Next, SPLBLD displays a directory 
of all spelling files. These files have 
.SPL extenders. Now type in the name 
of the new spelling file. If the file al- 
ready exists, it will be replaced with 
the new one. 

Yak-Spell Builder then prompts you 
to type in the first word in your spell- 
ing list. It's best to work from a pre- 
pared word list with carefully 
checked spelling. After each word is 
entered, you'll be asked to to verify 
the spelling and correct any mistakes. 

Now speak the word. Remember, 
the word must be spoken clearly, dis- 
tinctly and carefully. You'll see the 
familiar reverse video plus sign at the 
top left of the screen. This means that 
the program is learning the current 
word. 

Yak-Spell Builder will immediately 
play back the word. If it doesn't sound 
right, pull back on the joystick. Then 
you can re-rccord the word. You can 
do this as many times as necessary to 
get just the right sound. When you 
hear a sound you like, press the 
joystick button to save it, and con- 
tinue with the next word. 

Immediately after the word is 
learned, Yak-Spell Builder displays the 
"total vocabulary size." This number 
shows you how much RAM your 
speech file is using. 

The session ends when 20 words 
have been typed in, or when you 
press [RETURN] instead of typing a 
word. 

Next, the program will ask you 
to say "correct" and "try again." 
Yak-Spell uses these words to tell you 
if you spelled the word correctly. 



Of course, you can get creative and 
make special sound effects, sing a few 
notes of a favorite ditty, or execute a 
Bronx cheer instead of the above 
phrases. 

The spell builder then writes all the 
words to a disk file, using the name 
previously specified with an .SPL ex- 
tender All the speech data learned by 
the Voice Master is saved to another 
file by the same name, but with an 
.SPK extender Finally the user is 
prompted to print a hardcopy list of 
the words. 

Generally it is a good idea to print 




Yak-Spell 
will give 

you a spelling 
quiz — in 

Matt Ratcliffs 
o^vn voice. 



the list, and let the "student" review 
it before taking a Yak-Spelling exam. 
No matter how carefully the words 
are pronounced, something is alvrays 
lost in the translation from human 
voice to computerized digital data. 
Occasionally, foreknowledge of the 
word is a necessity for understanding 
what the computer is "saying." 

It would be nice to have a separate 
editor program for updating speech 
and dictionary files. But if the spell 
builder had gotten any larger, it just 



would not run under Atari DOS. 
When SPLBLD.BAS is loaded and its 
arrays initialized, there are only 65 
bytes of free memory. 

A separate editor program could 
SLOAD the speech data and word file, 
and then let the user correct spelling 
mistakes, make additions, deletions, 
or relearn words. It would be a real 
challenge to provide all that flexibil- 
ity with only 2K or 3K of BASIC code. 

TECHNICAL NOTES 

When RUN, Yak-Spell first initial- 
izes all its arrays, including TALKiS, 
a 12000 byte speech data buffer Then 
a subroutine DIMensions and initial- 
izes COVLiS and COVP8 strings, which 
will contain the load and play assem- 
bly language routines, respectively. 

Lines 1010 through 1250 and the 
file COVOX.SYS make up a complete 
' 'tool kit ' ' for writing talking programs 
which require no extra hardware or 
memory-hungry support software to 
use existing speech data files. 

There are several steps to follow to 
put the Covox Coach tool kit to work. 
First, initialize all working strings, in- 
cluding the speech buffer string. A 
12K buffer can hold about 20 to 25 
separate words. 

Next, call the subroutine to load the 
file COVOX.SYS into the COVLS and 
COVPS strings. This begins at line 
1130 in YAKSPELL.BAS. (All lines 1010 
through 1250 from YAKSPELL.BAS 
are required.) 

After initializing these strings, a 
speech file may be loaded as follows: 

TALKS = 'D:FOOD.SPK":REM 
TALKS was DIMendioned to 12000 
bytes. 

ERR = USR(ADR(COVL«), 
ADR(T\LK$), 12000):REM This is 
the COVoTi. load USR routine. 

The assembly language USR rou- 
tine, above, expects three values: 

—The address of the string contain- 
ing the actual machine language code 
for the USR routine, ADR(COVL$). 

—The address of the speech buffer, 
ADR(TALKJ!). 

—The total size of the speech buffer, 



20 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



12000. 

The speech buffer (TA.LK$) must 
contain the filename of the speech file 
before the USR caU. After the USR caU 
is through, an error status code is 
returned in the variable ERR. If ERR 
= 136 is there, the end of the file was 
reached before 12000 bytes were 
loaded. This means the entire speech 
file fit into the speech buffer, TALK$. 

If ERR = 1, the USR routine was 
able to load 12000 bytes of speech 
data, but did not reach the end of the 
file — more data is available to load. In 
other words, the speech file is bigger 
than TA.LKS.) The only problem this 
causes is that some words may get 
"chopped off when played back. 

The formula for calculating mem- 
ory and total words for a speech file 
which has just been loaded is: 

BASE =PEEK(256)* 256 

MEM=PEEK(BASE + 256) + 256* 
PEEK(BASE + 257)-BASE + 
256 

TW =PEEK(BASE + 259) 

These equations, when used im- 
mediately after loading a speech file 
with the USR routine described 
above, give you three pieces of infor- 
mation: 

— BASE is the starting address of the 
Covox speech data. Note that BASE is 
not necessarily the same address as 
the buffer string. It wiU be rounded 
up to the next page (256 byte bound- 
ary address). 

— MEM tells you how much RAM 
you need to hold the entire speech 
data file. 

— T W is the total number of words 
defined in the data file. 

If MEM is larger than the speech 
buffer, TALKS, then you must increase 
the string size, then adjust the USR call 
which loads the file into the string. 
Alternatively, you may re-record the 
speech file, talking faster to make it fit. 

There is no need to worry when 
the speech file is larger than the string 
reserved to hold it, since the load rou- 
tine will not load any more than the 
amount specified in the USR call. 

Use the equation for MEM, above. 



to find out how much larger the 
buffer string must be if the error code 
is a 1 instead of 136. 

The Covox play utility requires 
speech data to begin on a page bound- 
ary (an address evenly divisible by 
256). The loader places the page 
number in memory location 256 
($0100). For example, 16384 ($4000) 
is an address which is evenly divisi- 
ble by 256 ( 16384/256 = 64 ). In this 
case, the loader will place a 6A into 
memory location 256. 

Now, use the BASE equation above, 
instead of "BASE = 16384", as shown 




You can 

re-record each 

word as often as 

necessary to 

get exactly the 

right sound. 



in the Covox Voice Master Jr. manual, 
appendix 1. Then all the other sam- 
ple computations given in pages 29 
through 32 of the manual will work 
properly. 

After a speech file has been success- 
fully loaded, the words may be spo- 
ken. The USR call is: 

A = USR(ADR(COVP$),WORDNO, 
VOL,SPEED,SCREENMODE) 

This USR routine expects five 
values: 

—The address of the string contain- 



ing the actual machine language code 
for the USR routine, ADR(COVPS). 

—The number of a word previously 
LEARNed with the assistance of the 
VM800 software, WORDNO. This 
may be any value from through 63. 

—The amplitude, or volume of the 
speech, VOL. This may be any value 
from to 15, and works like BASIC'S 
SOUND command. You'll normally 
keep this parameter fixed at 15. 

—The SPEED of playback, which 
may be any value from to 4. Nor- 
mally LEARN mode is done at a speed 
of 2. For correa sound, the playback 
speed should match it. Experimenta- 
tion with the SPEED results in some 
interesting effects which are of very 
limited usefulness. 

—The SCREENMODE should be 34 
to keep the display on during play- 
back, or to turn it off. With the 
screen off, the speech quality is only 
slightly better. 

SOURCE CODE 

The file VMLOAD.M65 is the 
MAC/65 assembly language source 
code for the relocating loader utility. 
Study of this file, along with the notes 
in the Voice Master Junior user man- 
ual (pages 29-32), will reveal the in- 
ternal structure of the data files. 

The play routine is simply coded 
as .BYTE statements, taken from the 
PLAY program provided on the Voice 
Master Jr disk. With minor modifica- 
tions, VMLOAD.M65 may be used in 
stand-alone assembly language or AC- 
TION! programs. 

Employing this new load utility for 
Covox speech files, Yak-Spell can 
grow by another 12K of code, even 
with its 12K speech buffer initialized. 
With a little study of the Yak-Spell 
program, you should be able to cre- 
ate some very educational and enter- 
taining verbose software for your fam- 
ily and friends. 

Note: The author wishes to thank 
Kevin Gevatosky and Brad Stewart of 
Covox Inc. for their generous, in- 
finitely patient assistance with the Co- 
vox Coach project. A 



MAY 1989 



21 



Irrational 



Computing 



By Brian Siano 




'Kook Mail" database for fun and profit. 



Until I began my Kook Mail 
project, I was hardly 
aware of how much the 8- 
bit Atari computer could 
do in terms of a personal business. I'd 
used AtariWriter for freelance word 
processing (always a moneymaker 
when you live near a university), my 
own writing — and games, of course. 
But the Kook Mail project illustrated 
just what I could do with an Atari. 
I have always been fascinated with 
pseudo-science — perpetual motion 
machines, flat-Earth theories, myths 
about Atlantis and the Bermuda Tri- 
angle, quack medicine and UFO sto- 
ries. Whenever I came across a really 
good piece of strangeness — 
something that was detailed, fiinny 
and highly original — I kept it. Some- 
times this made my housemates ner- 
vous, but I had a good time. 

So I had a small, disorganized col- 
lection when the Fall '86 issue of the 
Whole Earth Review came out. It was 
dedicated to "Strange Myths and Ec- 
centric Science, " and the funniest ar- 
ticle was an account of collecting 
Kook Mail by Ivan Stang. 

Stang, a co-founder of the parody 
cult. Church of the SubGenius, had 
collected this stuff for years, culling 
it from ads in the National Enquirer, 
Fate, Soldier of Fortune and the 
Weekly World News. Stang included 
a lengthy list of recommended ad- 
dresses, with hilarious descriptions of 
what they had to offer. All you needed 



22 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



to do was write for information. I 
decided to put my Atari to work on 
my own collection, so I set up a 
SynFile + database, adding Stang's list 
to my own. 

The file contained the name, ad- 
dress and brief description of each or- 
ganization. I also included a set of 
evaluations ranging from "Dull and 
Boring" to "Truly Strange Minds" and 
"Top Of the Heap." My classification 
system included Weird Science, UFO 
Contactees, Lone Eccentrics and New 
Age. I also kept records of the as- 
sumed names I'd used — no, I didn't 
want these people to know my real 
name. 

I found a novel use for SynFile's 
mail-merge capabilities as well. Each 
record has a long section of text 
marked Insert. This could contain a 
sentence designed for a given group. 
For example, "I am interested in the 
truths that the scientific establishment 
won't tell us about." This way, ray re- 
quests for information don't look like 
a form letter. And it's a nice way to 
exercise the database. 

In the book, "Give Me that Prime 
Time Religion" (Oklahoma Book Pub- 
lishing, 1979), author Jerry Sholes 
describes how a prominent evangelist 
uses a sophisticated mail-merge data- 
base to help him read, answer and 
pray over the 20,000 letters he 
receives daily. The letters are first 
categorized by problem type — marital 
problems, physical problems, politi- 
cal fears, etc. Each letter goes into the 
database and computer-generated re- 
plies are sent out with stock para- 
graphs regarding specific problems. 
Then the evangelist actually prays 
over computer-generated lists of ad- 
dresses. 

Granted, in SynFile + the Inserts 
would be limited to 255 characters 
(though you can get around that). But 
I was doing something roughly com- 
parable to a multi-million dollar 
direct-mail system — on an Atari 
130XE system that cost less than 
S400. 

The project has gone well. My data- 



base has nearly 140 addresses, and I 
have a substantial file of mystical 
pronouncements, flying saucer 
blueprints and sure-fire methods for 
contacting the Advanced Guardian 
Veknors from Venus Etheria. 

ALL KOOKS? 

Some Antic readers might resent 
seeing ideas they believe in catego- 
rized with others they find irrational. 
For example, I don't believe in UFOs, 
so my database has plenty of UFO- 
oriented groups. The phrase "Kook 
Mail" is perhaps a bit misleading. 



Are they 

crazy, or creative 

eccentrics? 



Many organizations on my list can 
best be described as creative eccen- 
trics and are not crazy — not by a long 
shot. I can't help feeling a kind of 
respectful affection for the creativity 
involved. 

I was surprised at the project's 
popularity in my neighborhood. 
Friends and acquaintances wanted co- 
pies of my address list, and suddenly 
I was in the self-publishing business. 
SynFile + generated the initial lists 
with its Labels function and I ex- 
panded the descriptions with 
AtariWriter. 

With a short introduction and a 
cover made with Print Shop software, 
the whole 15-page booklet sold pretty 
well at $A a copy. And many of my 
customers have material from other 
sources, so my list just keeps grow- 
ing. Here are some original entries — 
including mistakes in grammar, spell- 
ing and punctuation accurately 
quoted from the sources: 

WEIRD SCIENCE 
ESP Lab of Texas 



Box 216 

219 Southridge Drive 

Edgewood, TX 75117 

Free info 

Truly Strange Minds 

FUN approach to Magick. NO HOG- 
WASH. Robust, folksy, and intention- 
ally funny mailings for "Astral Al" G. 
Manning's ESP course tell of corre- 
spondence courses, teaching tapes 
and magickal supplies. Lots of 
jokes — this is more like David Letter- 
man than Edgar Cayce. 

Flat Earth Research Society 

Covenant People's Church 
Box 2533 
Lancaster, CA 93539 

Flat Earth News, SIO per year 
Truly Strange Minds 

"We have proved earth flat, by exper- 
ment and can be demenstrated, most 
is water . . Gods Law stillstands. . .' 
water seeks its won LEVEL., and lays 
flat." Extremely poor typists are the 
last bastions of true rationality, fight- 
ing the false religion of Science. "We 
DO NOT SAY FALL OFF FLAT 
WORLD, WE SAY YOU WOULD ALL 
OFF THE GREASE BALL WORLD." 

RELIGIONS & CULTS 
Pyramid of One 

251 NW Bailey 
Hillsboro, OR 97123 

SASE 

Top Of the Heap 

"Heavenly Emergence of Supreme 
Being. Highest awareness/grace/heal- 
ing. Wonderful life transformations. 
Dynamic activities transcending 
body/ego/drugs. Unlock gateway to 
miracles." 

POLITICS & CONSPIRACIES 
Monster Raving Loony Party 

13 Chippenham Mews 
London W9, England 

Write for info 
Hysterically Funny 

Remember that Monty Python rou- 
tine about the eleaion returns, featur- 



MAY 1989 



23 



ing the SiUy Party and Tarquin Fintim- 
linbinwhinbimlin Bus Stop F'tang 
F'tang Ole Biscuit Barrel? That really 
happens. Screaming Lord Sutch has 
been doing this stunt, running for 
Parliament, for the past several years. 
His platform is that he would do ab- 
solutely nothing, thus following 
precedent. Dignified British election 
officials end up having to read the 
rosters of such groups as the New 
Year's Eve party and the Bring Your 
Own Party. 

American Imperial Party 

Spengler Group 
P.O. Box 65085 
St. Paul, MN 55165 

Free 1-page party platform. 
Highly Original 

"Had enough of western decline? WE 
STAND FOR CONQUEST. For men 
who are ready to own the world." 
Balance the budget by cancelling 60% 
of the national debt. Ensure justice by 
allowing "Star Chamber" courts and 
holding public executions of existing 
prisoners. Restore military prestige by 
assassinating vocal enemies. Restore 
personal honor by allowing prostitu- 
tion and open vengeance, and disal- 
lowing women drivers. Cure world 
poverty by allowing slavery, and 
silencing the journalists who cover it. 
How serious these guys are is any- 
body's guess. 

LONE ECCENTRICS 

All-One-God-Faith 

Dr Bronner 
RO. Box 28 
Escondido CA, 92025 

ScroUs, $2 each 
Top Of the Heap 

You may have seen Dr Broimer's 
castile soaps in your local health food 
store. "Teach the moral ABC that 
unites mankind free, lightning-like, 
5-billion strong and we're all-One." 
Bronner's densely printed labels are 
PACKED with this stuff. It's good soap 
too, with a cooling peppermint feel. 
But "DILUTE. DILUTE." A 

24 



7)'pe-Iii Software 



Butter- 
fingers 



By Kevin Gevatosky 



If you ever lost work 

by pressing the [CLEAR\ key 

when you meant to press [INSERT], 

Butterfingers is for you. This short BASIC 

translation of a machine-language 

routine works on 8-bit Atari 

computers of any memory 

size, with disk drive. 



The cursor was at the very 
end of the hundred-plus- 
character line and I was just 
about to press [RETURN] 
when I noticed that I had left out a 
right parenthesis. So, I moved the cur- 
sor over to the spot where I wanted 
to insert it and ZAP! "#&*@!," I 
shouted, "my slippery fingers did it 
again!" 

Then came that all-too-familiar 
sinking feeling that occurs whenever 



hard programming work disappears 
right before my eyes. You see, instead 
of pressing the [CONTROL] and [IN- 
SERT] keys, as intended, I accidentally 
pressed [CONTROL] and [CLEAR] 
and erased the whole screen. Worse, 
since I had not yet pressed the [RE- 
TURN] key, the line was lost and had 
to be re-typed. 

The Atari's full-screen editor is one 
of its finest and praiseworthy features, 
but I think it vras a design oversight 

ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 




No more ''Oops, I Hit [Clear]" blues. 



to aUow the [CONTROL] [CLEAR] key 
combination to clear the screen when 
[SHIFT] [CLEAR] would have been 
sufficient. It's just too close to [CON- 
TROL] [INSERT]. 

Some of you may be thinking that 
there is no "design oversight" and I 
should just be more careful. Well, in 
my own defense I'll just say that I 
watch what's displayed on the screen 
and I don't like to break my concen- 
tration and look down at the key- 
board. Besides, I don't have dainty lit- 
tle fingers. 

So now, after years of tolerating this 
aggravating situation, I finally reali2ed 
that there was something I could do 
about it. If you feel as I do then But- 
terfingers is for you. 

HOW IT WORKS 

Butterfingers is a small assembly 
language routine that loads into mem- 
ory at Page 6, and uses locations 1536- 
1621 (J0600-S0655). Make sure your 
BASIC program does not use any of 
these locations, or else Butterfingers 
will not work. 

Butterfingers substitutes the oper- 



ating system's normal keyboard inter- 
rupt with a customized one that exa- 
mines all keystrokes before they are 
sent to the Screen Editor When the 
interrupt deteas a key code for [CON- 
TROL] [CLEAR] or [SHIFT] [CLEAR], 
it filters them out and prevents acci- 
dental clearing of the screen. 

I did not want to eliminate the 
clear-screen function entirely, just 
make it more difficult to access. So the 
routine lets you clear the screen by 
simultaneously pressing [CONTROL] 
[SHIFT] [CLEAR]. 

LOADING THE PROGRAM 

Type in Listing 1, FINGERS.BAS, 
check it with TYPO II and be sure to 
SAVE a copy before you RUN it. 

When RUN, the program creates a 
binary file named FINGERS.EXE. This 
file should be copied onto another 
disk containing DOS.SYS, and re- 
named AUTORUN.SYS. Antic Disk 
owners wiU fmd EINGERS.EXE on the 
monthly disk. 

FINGERS.M65 is the MAC/65 as- 
sembly language source code, and is 
provided mainly for study purposes. 



You do not need to type Listing 2 to 
use Butterfingers. 

Once you have Butterfingers on 
disk as an AUTORUN.SYS file, turn off 
your Atari. Place your Butterfingers 
disk in drive 1, and turn on your Atari. 
The program will load and run auto- 
matically. Since the program works 
with Atari BASIC, XL and XE owners 
should not hold down the [OPTION] 
key when turning on the computer. 
Once enabled, Butterfingers will re- 
main active until you turn off your 
Atari. NOTE: Butterfingers also works 
with many other languages, including 
TurboBASIC, BASIC XL, Atari 
Microsoft BASIC. It will not work 
with MAC/65, even when the code is 
relocated off Page 6. A 



Kevin Gevatosky is a software engineer 
in Eugene, Oregon. His first Antic arti- 
cle, BASIC Ttacer, appeared in the Septem- 
ber 1986 issue As Atari consultant for Co- 
vox, Inc he helped develop the Voice 
Master speech digitizer used in this issue's 
Super Disk Bonus. 

Listing on page 45 



MAY 1989 



25 



BACK ISSUE 



Complete Your Atari "Toolkit' 



SAVE 25% TO 35% 



How To Order: 



Simply give the Order Numbers of the 
issues you want, and include the letter 
corresponding to the following selections: 

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The ATARI Resource 



Missing any Issues? Looking for those great utilities, 

games, and reviews? You'll find It all right here! 

Copies are limited, so order today! 



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ISSUE 



1 April 1983: Games— 3-D Maze, Voyeur (NoDisk) 

2 May 1983: Telecomputing— Microids, 

Tele Chess (no Disk) 

3 June 1983: Databases— Stargazing, 

Dancin' Man (No Disk) 

4 July 1983: Adventure Games — Dragonsmoke, 

Shoot-em-up Math 

5 August 1983: Graphics— 3-D Fuji, Keystroke 

Artist 

6 September 1983: Education— P/M Tutor 

7 October 1983: Sports Games— AutoCassette 

8 November 1983: Sound & Music— Air Raid, 

Casting Characters 

9 December 1983: Buyer's Guide— 

AUTORUN.SYS, Automate Player/Missiles 

10 January 1984: Printers— Pocket Calendars, 

Screen Dump 

11 February 1984: Personal Finance— TYPO, 

Gauntlet 

12 March 1984: International Issue — DiskRead, 

Poker Solitaire 

13 April 1984: Games— Risky Rescue, 

Math Wizard 

14 May/ June 1984: Exploring XL Computers— 

Escape from Epsilon, Scroll to the Top 

15 July 1984: Communications— AMODEM, 

BASIC Animation Secrets 

16 August 1984: Disk Drives— Horseplay, Recall 

17 September 1984: Computer Graphics — 

Graphics Converter, Olympic Dash (No Magazine) 

18 October 1984: Computer Learning— Bouncing 

Ball, Antic 4/5 Editor/Animator 

19 November 1984: Computer Adventures- 

Adventure Island, Advent X-5 

20 December 1984: Buyer's Guide — Infobits, 

Biffdrop 

21 January 198S: Super Utilities— TYPO II, 

DISKIO 

22 February 1985: Finances— Home Loan 

Analyzer, Drum/Bass Synth 

23 March 1985: Printers— Kwik Dump, Font 

Maker 

24 April 1985: Computer Frontiers— Dot Matrix 

Digitizer, Speech Editor 

25 May 1985: New Super Ataris— Son of Infobits, 

Arena Racer 

26 June 1985: Computer Arts— View 3-D, 

The Musician 

27 July 1985: Computer Challenges — Miniature 

Golf, Guess That Song 

28 August 1985: Telecommunications— Atari 

' Toons , Pro * Term 

29 September 1985: Power Programming— 

One-Pass Disk Copy 130, Crickets 



ORDER » 



ISSUE 



-Graph 3D, GEM 



30 October 1985: Mind Tools- 

Color Cascade 

31 November 1985: New Communications— 

TYPO II Double Feature, 130XE Memory 
Management 

32 December 1985: Shoppers Guide— DISKIO 

Plus, Box-In 

33 January 1986: Atari Products are Back- 

Appointment Calendar, Dungeon Master's 
Apprentice 

34 February 1986: Printer Power— T-Shirt 

Construction Set, Forth Escapes 

35 March 1986: Practical Applications— Lunar 

Lander Constructor, Lie Detector 

36 April 1986: Computer Mathematics— Fractal 

Zoom, 3-D Fractals 

37 May 1986: 4th Anniversary— Digital 

Gardener, Molecular Weight Calculator 

38 June 1986: Summer Computing— Weather 

Wizard, Bomb Squad 

39 July 1986: Computer Arts- Amazing Card 

Shuffler, Graf con ST 

40 August 1986: Online Communications— 

Ultrafont, Floppy Filer 

41 September 1986: Weather— WEFAX Decoder 

(8-bit/ST), BASIC Tracer 

42 October 1986: Hard Disks— Video Stretch, 

TYPO ST 

43 November 1986: Personal Finance— Budget 

dataBASE, V-Graph 

44 December 1986: Shoppers Guide— Stepper 

Motors, Nuclear Waste Dump 

45 January 1987: Talking Atari— Talking 

Typewriter, Rebound 

46 February 1987: Word Processing— SF 

Fogger, Electric Charliel 

47 March 1987: Dvorak Keyboard, 

Multi-AUTORUN 

48 April 1987: —Designer Labels, Taxman 

40 May 1987: 5th Anniversary— A-Rogue, Poker 

Slot Machine 

50 June 1987: Animation— Verbot Commander, 

Citadel 

51 July 1987: Print Anything— Ghost Writer, 

Your Net Worth 

52 August 1987: Atari Muscle — Sideways 

Spreadsheet, Diamond Dave 

53 September 1987: Work/Play— Mighty Mailer, 

Maximillian B. 

54 October 1987: Football Predictor— Antic 

Prompter (S-bit/ST), Spelling Checker 

55 November 1987: Practical Applications— 

Critical-Path Projects, WYSIWYG Cassettes 

56 December 1987: Print Holiday— RS. Envelope 

Maker, Antic Publisher 




SPACE-AGE 
ATARI 



By George Lockard 




Close-up of the Atari 800 workstation at 
NASA's Langley Research Center. 




Atari 800 workstation at NASA's Langley Research Center 



28 



NASA 



research 



8-bit 



style 



In the highly technological and 
scientific environment of 
NASA's Langley Research Cen- 
ter at Hampton, Virginia, we 
use an expanded Atari 8-bit computer 
system daily. 

The Atari computer system was sur- 
plus equipment, and although it had 
some age on it when 1 acquired it, the 
system was still in fine working order 
and has performed well since. I have 
used Atari 8-bit computer systems in 
several professional applications in- 
stead of the "Big" machines, at con- 
siderable savings, and they have per- 
formed extremely well. 

Langley is assembling and testing 
the Halogen Occulation Experiment 
(HALOE) satellite instrument for flight 
on the Upper Atmospheric Research 
Satellite (UARS) to be launched by 
late 1991. HALOE will measure and 
monitor seven gases which are criti- 
cal to understanding atmospheric 
chemistry. 

These gases are measured by opti- 
cal detectors. The detectors have to be 
tested and characterized extremely 
well. One of the tests performed is the 
measurement of the linearity of the 
detector's response to various signals. 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



It is in this test set-up that the Atari 
system is utilized. 

The system hardware consists of an 
Atari 800 with an Axlon 128K mem- 
ory expansion board, an Indus disk 
drive, an Axlon IMP printer with 
printer interface and a Panasonic 
color computer monitor. The system 
software consists of only a few com- 
mercial software products, mainly 
Letter Perfect, Data Perfect and 
B/Graph. Most of the software that is 
used is custom written to meet the 
system requirements. 

The Atari computer is put to use in 
several ways. Some programs were 
written to generate tables and charts 
to be used in determining the equip- 
ment settings for the required test 
conditions, while special programs 
have been developed to enable it to 
perform data reduction and analysis 
of the measured data. This informa- 
tion, along with the measured data, 
is loaded into the main program 



which then compares the test results 
with the test requirements, to deter- 
mine if the detectors met the 
spaceflight specifications. 

Programmed comments are dis- 
played on the screen to inform the 
operator of various conditions of the 



Our 

Atari 800 analyzes 

HALOE data. 



test. All of the computational and 
measured results are also available to 
the operator for review. When the 
operator is satisified, the general 
housekeeping information, along 
with operator comments, is then 
recorded. 



Formatted calibration/test result 
sheets are printed out and the results 
are saved, since we are required to 
keep all of the test data and results un- 
til UARS becomes inoperative. Status 
reports with graphs are generated us- 
^ ing the Atari's word processing capa- 
bilities. These reports are distributed 
throughout NASA for review by the 
appropriate responsible individuals. 
Atari 8-bit computers such as the 
130XE and the 800 series may not 
have the speed, memory and graphics 
resolution of the more powerful and 
expensive 16 and 32 bit computers 
around today, but they should not be 
overlooked as the low-cost and highly 
efficient computers that they are. I 
have found that Atari lives up to its 
slogan, "Power without the Price."A 

George Eugene lockard is an Engineer- 
ing Technician who has a 15-year back- 
ground working with electronics at 

NASA. 



A, 

ATARI 



AUTHORIZED SERVICE 
CENTER FOR ALL 
ATARI PRODUCTS 



micrOtyme 



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ST's Color or Mdiio CALL 

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NAP Amber W/Audio 95 

Monitor Cables in Stock , , , CALL 

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PRINTER SUPPLIES 

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Basic XL Tool Kit 

Bop 'n' Wrestle 

Champ LndeRunner 18 

Chessmaster 2000 27 

F-15 Strike Eagle 21 

Flight Night 20 

Flight Simulator II 34 

Scenery Disks ea 15 



Scenery Disk Set (#1-6) 74 

Fraction Action 21 

Gauntlet 23 

Gemstone Warrior 12 

Gettysburg 39 

Gunsiinger 17 

Hardball 20 

Heartware 8 

Home Accountant 27 

Inliitralor 19 

Karateka 18 

Kindercomp 18 

Last V-8 7 

Leader Board 11 

Leather Goddesses 22 

Loderunner 23 

MAC/65 52 

Mastenype 27 

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Music Const. Set , , , 
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Phanlassielorll 25 

Pinball Const. Set 11 

Planetarium 23 

PrintShop 28 

PrintShop Companion 24 

Graphics Libraries 16 

PS Interlace 18 

R-Tlme-BCart 48 

Racing Destruction 11 

Rambo XL 28 

RefQrger88 12 

Rubber Stamp 20 

Silent Service 24 



Summer Games 19 

SX Express 24 

Tomahawk 21 

Top Gunner 17 

Touchdown Football 11 

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Tycoon 21 

Typesetter 22 

Ultima 111. IV CALL 

Video Poker 7 

Video Vegas 21 

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SIIVUVIONS 
THERMAL RIBBONS 

Ink your own • get better copies 



By Thomas Simmons 



SIMMONS THERMAL RIBBONS 




SCOTCH TAPE 



BLACK LIQUID WAX SHOE POLISH 



I 



30 



t's hard to resist those low 
prices on thermal printers. 
However, there are two draw- 
backs to these apparent bar- 



gains. Ribbons are expensive, one- 
shot items and the printed copy is 
generally of low quality, usually too 
light. 



Now I have come up with a way to 
ink your own ribbons — and get bet- 
ter copies. 

SIMMONS 
THERMAL RIBBONS 

Prices for thermal ribbons can 
range as high as six dollars each. Do 
you want to pay fifty cents per page 
of printout? Of course not. So why 
not do-it-youiself and make Simmons' 
Thermal Tapes? For about thirty-three 
cents you can make yourself 200 
yards of thermal tape. Here is what 
you need: 

Scotch Tape in 200 yard rolls, 1/2 
inch width. 

Black liquid shoe polish. 

Unwind the Scotch tape on a sheet 
of newspaper, spreading the liquid 
shoe polish on the sticky side of the 
tape. Let the tape dry thoroughly. 
When you have coated all the tape, re- 
wind it into a roll. 

Properly coated, the tape will no 
longer be sticky. The liquid shoe pol- 

ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



ish is a wax that clings to the sticky 
part of the tape. When you wind this 
tape on the spools of your thermal 
printer, be sure that the waxy side 
faces the paper on which you will 
print. Otherwise, the printhead will 
clog with wax and nothing will print. 
(Antic holds no responsibility for 
any damages resulting from use of 
the techniques described in this artt- 
c/e -ANTIC ED) 

When you print, the thermal pins 
of the dot-matrix momentarily heat 
the smooth side of the tape. This heat 
melts the black wax of the shoe pol- 
ish, which immediately transfers to 
the typing paper The result is perma- 
nent and waterproof, producing a 
high quality, non-smear printout! Try 
it, and you'll quickly be convinced 
that my Simmons Thermal Tape idea 
is pure genius, or pure Shinola, de- 
pending on the type of shoe polish 
you use. 

This process will also work on your 
old Atari 825 dot-matrix printer Just 
put the liquid shoe polish on your 
printer ribbon and start printing. The 
waxy polish actually preserves the 
ribbon and there is no drying out. 
Cost: about three cents per ribbon re- 
inking! A caution, however: there will 





^ SIMMONS THERMAL CARBONS 


CARBON PAPER^^^H 


^^ 




^^^^^ PAINT "CARBON" SIDE 




^^^^^^ X WITH BLACK LIQUID 




^^^^^^^ SHOE POLISH 


TYPING PAPER \^B 


W^ 




\^/ REMEMBER: REMOVE THE THERMAL 




\/ RIBBON WHEN YOU USE THIS DEVICE. 



spools. As before, make sure you print 
with the sticky side toward the paper 
you're printing on. 

SIMMONS 
THERMAL CARBONS 

\t)u can also make your own ther- 
mal carbons. Go out and buy the 
cheapest carbon paper you can find. 
It is generally low quality stuff, made 
of thin, almost plastic, paper. This 



The result is 

a permanent, T^^aterproof , 

high quality, non-smear 

printout! 



be a wax buildup on your printhead 
that needs periodic cleaning. 

If you have a craving for color, you 
might try taking a wax crayon to 
your adhesive tape. Mark the sticky 
side of the tape with any color of 
crayon. Be careful to cover the tape 
thoroughly with the crayon. Then 
wind the tape onto your printer 



works to your advantage when it 
comes to heat-transfer printing. 

Take that bottle of black liquid shoe 
polish and evenly paint the carbon 
side of the paper Let it dry. 

Put the dry carbon paper on top of 
a clean sheet of typing paper, painted 
side down. Take the old thermal tape 
out of the printer and insert the paper 



with the back of the carbon paper 
facing the printhead. The thermal 
dot-matrix pins strike the carbon 
paper and transfer a brilliant black 
wax image to your typing paper 

Depending on the price of your 
typing paper, the cost should be about 
two cents per page. This goes down 
to a fraction of a cent per page of 
print, if you re-coat the same carbons. 
How's that for home-grown savings? 

NOTE: Don't use this technique 
with the Atari 1027 printer You really 
must have the proper ink rollers to get 
the high quality results this printer is 
capable of. 

Not only does black liquid shoe 
polish work well on home-made rib- 
bons for thermal printers and the Atari 
825, it is also excellent for touching 
up grey streaks in your hair If you're 
bald like me, all you can do is put it 
on your shoes and use it with your 
printers. A 

Thomas Simmons' areas of expertise 
include CAT scan technology, nuclear 
magnetic monitoring, medical sensor 
construction, and creating handy do-it- 
yourself projects for the Atari. His quirky, 
but practical, tips have previously ap- 
peared in the May and June 1987 issues 
o/ Antic. 



MAY 1989 



31 



PRODUCT REVIEW 






I 




A X 



Affordable 8-bit MIDI choice. 



leviewed by Jeffrey Summers, M.D. 



The ATARI ST was the first 
personal computer to have 
MIDI ports built in, so the 
computer could communi- 
cate directly with electronic instru- 
ments. Atari 8-bit computers can also 
support MIDI, but require an interface 
to do so. One such device is MIDI- 
MAX, from Wizztronics. 

The MIDMAX interface is supplied 
in a package with the MIDI Music Sys- 
tem sequencing program, and another 
program that will convert files from 
the popular AMS public domain for- 
mat into MIDI Music System format. 
Several songs demonstrating the 
power of MIDI Music System are also 
included, such as "Flight of the Bum- 
ble Bee," "Maple Leaf Rag," and the 
"Beverly Hills Cop" Theme. 

The interface itself is a small, com- 
pact unit, about the size of an Atari 
XM301 modem. It is powered 
through the serial bus of the com- 
puter. It has a conneaor, so it does not 
need to be at the end of the daisy 
chain. 

Since it's powered by the serial bus 
MIDIMAX has the advantage of not 
requiring a transformer (I'm running 
out of outlets on my power strip). Un- 
fortunately, this has the disadvantage 
of causing a voltage drop that might 
affect the performance of other simi- 
lar devices. I have used MIDIMAX in 
conjunction with ICD's P:R: Connec- 
tion without incident, however 
The metal case appears to be quite 




8-bits require 

an interface like 

MIDIMAX. 



sturdy. There are MIDI in and MIDI 
out connectors, but no MIDI thru. 
Two MIDI cables are supplied for con- 
necting to your instrument. The in- 
terface works without problem. 

MIDI MUSIC SYSTEM 

MIDI Music System is the sequenc- 
ing program supplied with MIDIMAX . 
A sequencer sends a series of notes or 



instructions to an instrument. MIDI 
Music System is a full-featured se- 
quencer with 99 tracks, 20 of which 
may be sent over any of the 16 MIDI 
channels. MIDI Music System also 
sends MIDI clock information, allow- 
ing you to control drum machines. 

Each note in each track is entered 
as "note-octave-duration." For exam- 
ple, C4Q will play middle C for the 
duration of one quarter note. 

Notes may be entered from a MIDI 
keyboard as well. However, MIDI 
Music System does not time how long 
a note was played. A buffer holds the 
notes as you play them, and you must 
then add the note durations from the 
computer keyboard. 

Simple commands let you make 



32 



ANTIC, THE ATARI RESOURCE 



changes in patches, key, tempo, pitch 
wheel and velocity. Controller 
changes (mod wheel, volume 
changes, etc.) use a generic statement 
to set parameters. For example, P7,102 
sets controller number 7 to 102. (P7 
is the volume controller for most syn- 
thesizers). 

AMS TO MMS 

The conversion program between 
AMS (Advanced Music System) and 
MIDI Music System is quite useful, be- 
cause AMS files are commonly found 
in user group libraries and on bulle- 
tin boards. After conversion to MIDI 
Music System, you can play these 
songs on your synthesizer — much 
more pleasing than the bleeps that the 
computer produces. 

The program does not always seem 
to correctly translate the files, how- 
ever. It has particular difficulty with 
songs that use odd timings for notes, 
such as triplets. There are other pub- 



lic domain conversion programs that 
do a better job. The program supplied 
is better than nothing, but I suggest 
finding one of the other programs on 
your local bulletin board, or on GEnie 
or CompuServe. 

The manual covers the MIDI Mu- 
sic System program in depth and is 
quite complete. However, there is no 
technical information regarding the 
interface itself. This makes it difficult 
(though not impossible) to write your 
own programs using the interface. At 
least one MIDI handler is available as 
shareware. 

The only problems I have run into 
in about 6 months of use are proba- 
bly not related to the interface or soft- 
ware. With my Casio CZ synthesizer, 
certain notes seem to be "lost" — not 
played. The problem occurs most of- 
ten when a lot of MIDI information 
is being sent. 

I wrote to Wizztronics about the 
problem. They confirmed that there 



is a problem, but only with Casio CZ 
synthesizers. (Other MIDI interfaces 
apparently have the same problem 
with the CZ.) So, I purchased a Roland 
MT-32 tone generator (a tone genera- 
tor is essentially a synthesizer with- 
out keys) and since then have had no 
problems when using MIDIMAX. 

Essentially, an 8-bit user who 
wishes to experiment with MIDI has 
two choices: buy an ST or buy a MIDI 
interface. The ST is a powerful ma- 
chine, with good MIDI software 
availability— but it costs a heck of a 
lot more. There may not be as much 
software available for the 8-bit user, 
but the money you save on computers 
can buy you an extra piece of sound 
equipment. MIDIMAX is a good pack- 
age and an excellent introduction to 
MIDI for 8-bit users. A 

$229. Wizztronics, P.O. Box 122, Port 
Jefferson Station, NY 11776. (516) 
473-2507. 



GET YOURS FAST 




Super Bonus Program! 

Found only on the disk, it's too large a type-in 
program to fit in the magazine. 

Plus all I72K of this month's Antic programs on 
disk. Great 8-bit software without typing! 

Phone ToU Free 

(800) 234-7001 

Phone orders by Visa or MasterCard only 
AskforADS589-May 




The ATARI' Resource 



TERRIFIC SOFTWARE PRESENTS 

TWO NEW, SENSUOUS GAME TITLES 



Look out, Indiana Jones! 
Step aside. Bogie! 
Crash Garret fs in town! 



Don't wait 'till Sunday to catch-up on 
your favorite action comic — play 
CRASH GARRETT instead! 

No other adventure game is quite like 
this... 






Let ace flyer CRASH GARRETT escort 
you through Hollywood in the '30s to 
rescue sultry, sexy gossip columnist, 
Cynthia Sleeze, from the sinister Nazi 



mastermind Baron 
von Engel Krul 
and his cronies. 
Help CRASH stop 
this perverse Nazi 
spy-ring from kid- 
napping glamor- 
ous, American 
beauties to use as 
breeding stock for an Aryan race of 




superhumans. Be the voice in 
crash's head as he encounters ad- 
venture after adventure with a whole 
group of wacky, depraved characters 
including Caleb Thorn, psychoanalyst 
to the stars, and Lotta 
Linebacker, a female 
wrestler who knows what 
she wants from a man! 

CRASH GARRETT is 

style and pizzazz — an 
animated comic book 
with a slick, continential 
look. It's about as much 

terror, intrigue and suspense you'll 

want from any game! 



Play Stir Crazy With Boho 

Your idea of ''doing time" will definitely change! 



Had a little too much violence lately? 
Still want fun and action? Well, grab 
your joystick and join poor Bobo in six 
of the most graphically amusing 
adventure games ever on disk. 





Finally Bobo makes his escape and 
hurtles off into the sunset, right onto 
electric train cables. Bobo needs some 
pretty fancy footwork to avoid the 
pulsating current! 



Bobo's in prison — INZEESLAM- 
MER — where he spends most of his 
time performing menial chores and 
planning his escape. Bobo's no penal 
pushover! 

Bobo starts his day feeding porridge 
to hungry, irritable prisoners. Don't 

CRASH GARRETT and STIR CRAZY with Bobo are licensed 
Terrific Software is a trademarlc of Antic Software. *Atari ST 



let him get too befuddled, or else he'll 
end up with the porridge bucket on 
his head. 

K.P.'s next. Speed 
is the key here. 
Don't let Bobo get 
buried underneath 
a pile of spuds! 

An exhausted Bobo 
tries to catch up on 
his beauty sleep, but 
is constantly interrupted by the relent- 
less snoring of his cell mates. 





Available for Atari ST* and 
Amiga* Computers at your 
favorite store. To order by 
phone, call 800-234-7001. 

CRASH GARRETT— *39" 
STIR CRAZY with Bobo— *34" 

Pig 



Terrific Software, 544 Second St., San Francisco, 
CA 94107 (415) 957-0886 



trademarks of Infogrames. Terrific Software is the exclusive distributor of Infogrames products in North America, 
is a registered trademark of Atari Corp.; "Amiga® is a registered trademark of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. 



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B603 



PRODUCT REVIEWS 



Two Books for Atari Users 

Quest For Clues, Official Print Shop Handbook. Reviewed by Chester Cox 



QUEST FOR CLUES 

There are a lot of addicted but frus- 
trated adventure gamers out there. 
Maybe you're one of them — I know 
I am! I know of no less than five trade 
paperback books full of hints for var- 
ious adventures — plus dozens of hint- 
books for individual adventures. 

Newest of the lot is Quest for 
Clues. The editor is something of a 
legend himself— -Shay Addams, who 
puts out the adventure games news- 
letter QuestBusters and has suppos- 
edly played more adventures than 
anyone else alive. The book covers 
fifty games, but only 21-35 are of 
interest to Atari owners — 21 if you 
own an XL/XE, 30 if you own an ST, 
35 if you own both. Games as recent 
as 1986-7 are covered, including the 
chilling Lurking Horror, the ground- 
breaking Pawn, and the heartbreak- 
ing Ultima IV. 

But Quest for Clues is often just as 
confusing as the original adventures. 
Instead of giving straightforward 
hints, Addams chooses to encrypt his 
clues. By looking at the Code Key — 
or memorizing the simple cypher — 
and transposing letters, you can tedi- 
ously spell out clues or solutions. To 
further muddle things, the adventures 
are not arranged in alphabetical order 
Instead, they are arranged within 
chapters titled Disk Drive Detectives, 
Fantasy Lands and so on. If Addams is 
trying to keep players from the very 
real temptation of looking up all the 
clues at once, he has committed 
overkill. 

Quest for Clues, like the newslet- 
ter it springs from, assumes you want 
an entire walk-through of an adven- 
ture. Usually, only one or two puzzles 



stop you in a story. Individual hints 
leave some portion of your pride in- 
tact. A walk-through leaves me feel- 
ing that the author thinks I'm too stu- 
pid to finish an adventure on my own. 
If you prefer the satisfaction of solv- 
ing a puzzle yourself, but need just a 
little help. Quest might be more than 
you want. 

On the other hand, the maps are 
some of the very best I've seen for any 
adventure. I found no errors in any of 
them. If you're like me, and dislike 
clues but love maps, you'll love Quest 
for Clues.— CHESTER COX 

$19.95. Origin Systems. Distibuted by 
Broderbund Software, 17 Paul Drive, San 
Rafael, CA 94903. (415) 492-3500. 

OFFICIAL PRINT SHOP 
HANDBOOK 

Broderbund 's popular Print Shop 
software is so simple to use that many 
people have never even bothered to 
read the original manual. So Bantam's 
Official Print Shop Handbook by 
Randi Benton and Mary Schenck 
Balcer almost looks like a cheap at- 
tempt to sucker P.S. fans out of $17. 

But the large-format paperback 
book is loaded with shortcuts, ideas 
and gimmicks we hadn't figured out 
on our own. It's handy having all 
these references in one book, and 
there are also many templates and ex- 
amples that should prove irresistable. 

The writers assume that Print Shop 
is only available for Apple II, Commo- 
dore, and IBM. But the fonts, graphics 
and disks listed match with the Atari 
disks, so the book is compatible. 

The authors recommend creating 



a template box marked so you can de- 
termine where an icon would be sized 
within it. By printing these boxes in 
various formats (staggered, tiled, etc.) 
and sizes, you'll have a series of blank 
forms to help you determine how 
your finished Print Shop sign, letter- 
head, card, or banner will look. This 
addresses one of Print Shop's greatest 
faults: Print Shop does not preview 
the final form to your screen. 

Dozens of shortcuts are thrown out 
in a shotgun approach. Easy hints on 
double printing (winding the paper 
back to a specific spot to print on top 
of another printed form) are given, 
with some classy results shown. Some 
of the ideas will be unnecessary for 
longtime users. Antic has shown how 
to print labels with Print Shop icons 
(April 1987), create envelopes to fit 
PS. cards (December 1987) — and how 
to use P.S. fonts in a better banner pro- 
gram Ouly 1988). Also there are many 
public domain and commercial prod- 
ucts that use Print Shop icons and 
fonts in unexpected ways. 

StiU, there's enough useful informa- 
tion here for the daily Print Shop user 
to earn this book a place on the desk 
just above the monitor Best of all, 
many of the tips and graphic design 
principles in the handbook are use- 
ful with other printware. By keeping 
instructions and hints at the most ba- 
sic level, the Official Print Shop Hand- 
book becomes applicable to, well, 
everyday life. And that's where my 
Atari has always belonged.— CHESTER 
COX 

$16.95. Bantam Computer Books, 666 
Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10103. (212) 
765-6500. 



36 



ANTIC, THE AIXRI RESOURCE 



SOFTWARE LIBRARY 

TYPING SPECIAL ATARI CHARACTERS 



NORMAL VIDEO 


FOR TYPE 


FOR TYPE 


THIS THIS 


THIS THIS 


BCTRL , 


ffi CTRL S 


[BCTRL A 


m CTRL T 


□ CTRL B 


B CTRL U 


fflCTRL C 


D CTRL V 


fflCTRL D 


e CTRL W 


fflCTRL E 


B CTRL X 


0CTRL F 


B CTRL Y 


H CTRL G 


H CTRL Z 


a CTRL H 


G ESC ESC 


a CTRL I 


ffl ESC CTRL - 


B CTRL J 


ffl ESC CTRL = 


a CTRL K 


ffi ESC CTRL + 


El CTRL L 


BB ESC CTRL * 


n CTRL M 


m CTRL . 


□ CTRL N 


Bi CTRL ; 


B CTRL 


m SHIFT = 


ae CTRL P 


H ESC SHIFT 


ffl CTRL Q 


CLEAR 


e CTRL R 


ffl ESC DELETE 




ffl ESC TAB 



The Atari Special Characters and 
the keys you must type in order to 
get them are shown below: 

For [CONTROL] key combina- 
tion, hold down [CONTROL] while 
pressing the next key. For inverse 
[CONTROL] [A] through 
[CONTROL] [Z], press the [3] 
key— or [^k ] on the 400/800— then 
release it before pressing the next 
key (Press [H] or [^k] again to turn 
off inverse.) For [ESC] key combina- 
tions, press [ESC] and then release 
it before pressing the next key. 

Carefully study the chart above 
and pay close attention to differ- 
ences between lookalike characters 
such as the slash key's [/] and the 
[CONTROL] [F] symbol [0]. 



TYPO II AUTOMATIC PROOFREADER 

TYPO II automatically proofreads Antic's type-in BASIC listings. Type in the listing below and SAVE a copy to disk 
or cassette. Now type GOTO 32000. At the prompt, type in a single program line without tiie two-letter TYPO II 
code at the beginning. Then press [RETURN]. 

Your line will reappear at the bottom of the screen. If the TYPO II code does not match the code in the magazine, 
then you've mistyped your line. 

To call back a previously typed line, type [*], then the line number, then [RETURN]. When the completed line ap- 
pears, press [RETURN] again. This is how TYPO II proofreads itself. 

To LIST your program, press [BREAK] and type LIST. To return to TYPO II, type GOTO 32000. To remove TYPO 
II from your program, type LIST "D:FILENAME",0,31999, then [RETURN], then NEW, then ENTER "D:FILENAME", 
then [RETURN] . Now you can SAVE or LIST your program to disk or cassette. 



INVERSE VIDEO 


FOF 


1 TYPE 


THIS THIS 1 


□ 


ESC 




SHIFT 




DELETE 


D 


ESC 




SHIFT 




INSERT 


B ESC 1 




CTRL 




TAB 


D 


ESC 




SHIFT 




TAB 


D 


A CTRL . 


□ 


A CTRL ; 


a 


A SHI FT ^ 


□ 


ESC CTRL 2 


a 


ESC 




CTRL 




DELETE 


D ESC 1 




CTRL 




INSERT 



C^ 



Don't type ttie 
TVPO II Codes! 



UB 

un 

H5 

BN 

VC 

EM 
MS 

XH 



TH 
MF 



32900 REM TVPO II BV RNDY BARTON 

32010 REM UER. 1.0 FOR RNTIC MAGflZINE 

32820 CLR !DIM LINES tl20 J = CLOSE «»2!CL0 
5E 03 

32030 OPEN »2,4, 0, "E" :OPEN »3,5,0,"E" 

32040 ? ■•>«•■: POSITION 11.1:? ••DHHfflBOriB" 

32050 TROP 32040:POSITION 2,3:? "Tupe 
in a pro9ran line" 

32060 POSITION 1,4:? INPUT «2;LINE 

S:IF LINES="" THEN POSITION 2,4:LIST B 

:G0TO 32060 

32070 IF LINES tl, IJ =••«•• THEN B = UfiLcLIN 

ES t2, LEN(LINES> J> :POSITION 2,4:LIST B: 

GOTO 32060 

32080 POSITION 2,10:? "CONT" 

32090 B=:UfiL tLINESj :P0SITI0N 1,3:? •• •■ ; 



NV 
CN 
ET 

CE 
QR 



UU 

UJ 
JU 
EH 
BH 
HB 
IE 

UG 



32100 POKE 842.13:ST0P 

32110 POKE 842,12 

32120 ? •■«••: POSITION 11,1:? ■■■UDaHnUllB 

••:P05ITI0N 2,15:LIST B 

32130 C=0:ftN5=C 

32140 POSITION 2,ie:INPUT »3;LINES:IF 

LINES = "" THEN ? "LINE ";B;" DEL'ETED":G 

OTO 32050 

32150 FOR 0=1 TO LEN CLINES J : C=C+1 : flNS= 

nNS+ cCMflSCCLINES CD, D>>> :NEXT D 

32160 C0DE=INTCANS^676> 

32170 CaDE=nNS- cC0DEMe76> 

32180 HCODE=INT tC0DE^26> 

32190 LCODE=CODE- cHC0DE«26>+65 

32200 HC0DE=HC0DE+e5 

32210 POSITION 0.16:? CHRS (HCODE> ; CHRS 

CLCODEJ 

32220 POSITION 2,13:? "If CODE does no 

t natch press ■[liaUdiauiB and edit line a 

boue.":GOTa 32050 



MAY 1989 



37 



PLAY WITHOUT WORRYING ABOUT LOST PEGS 

CRIBBAGE ATARI 



Article on page 14 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes 



<:& 



AH 
NQ 
PF 
PO 

UK 



OF 
KB 
JU 
TT 



OZ 
TB 



TB 



HL 
AX 

KU 

YT 
PN 

CN 

RG 
LO 
AO 
SO 
NS 
ON 

RC 



FC 

JL 

NU 
OQ 



UY 
NK 
OB 
UN 



UF 
RZ 



Ufl 



00 
UT 



OH 



K5 



OU 
AN 



HU 



38 



2 REM CRIBBAGE ATARI! 
4 REH BY DAUID C OSBORN 
6 REM CCJ1989, ANTIC PUBLISHING INC 
18 GRAPHICS 2:DBUG=eiP=e!C=P! POKE 71B> 
P:GOSUB 25ee:REn TITLE 

28 ? !? !? ■' Enter lining Delay 8-9 
( e = Fast> 9 = Slow > 

38 TRAP 28 

48 INPUT D 

58 GOSUB 2438:D=D^2 

68 RESTORE 2978 : LP=XX ! GRAPHICS 18:G0SU 

B 585:P0KE 756,AA:F0R BB=?8B TO 712:RE 

AD EE:POKE BB.EE:NEXT BB 

65 RESTORE 2620 

78 POSITION 4,4!? *t6;"ClL»! !_P-." 

!L3S; = "1& 3- 5c 7 f : L4S = "2F 4c 6c 8C"!P 

OSITION 16.7 = ? »»6;"SS" 

88 POSITION 4,1!? »6;"!-P! .««"!POSITIOM 

2,2!? tt6;"l& 2F 3' 4C 5c 6C":P0SITI0N 

2.3!? nS:"SS SS SS SS SS SS" 
98 NC=CR!GOSUB 848!F0R Aa=8 TO 12 
188 CCAA>=INT cRND c8> «52 J +1 ! U CAA)=CCAA> 
:ScAAi=a 

118 IF AA THEN FOR BB=e TO AA-l!lF C cB 
B>=CcAA> OR CCAA>>52 THEN 188 
128 IF AA THEN NEXT BB 

138 IF UCAA»>13 THEN cAA J =U cAA> - 13 ! 5 c 
AAi=ScAA>+l:GOTO 138 

148 KCAA>=UCAA>+16 :IF UCAAX9 AND U cAA 
>-l THEN 28B 

158 IF UCAAJ=1 THEN KcAA»=97 
168 IF UcAA>=18 THEN KcAA>=31 
178 IF WCAA»=11 THEN KcnA>=98 
188 IF UcAA>=12 THEN KcAA>=27 
198 IF UCAA>=13 THEN KcAAi^lOB 
288 FcAA»=SCAA>+123!lF ScAA>=2 THEN Fc 
AAa=96 

218 IF 5CAAJ<2 THEN K CA AJ =K c A A> +96 ! F CA 
A>=FCAAi+96!lF KCAAX192 THEN KcAAi=Kc 
AAi+64 

228 NEXT AAsFOR AA=e TO 12 : M cAAi =AA : NE 
XT AA:LL=8:HH=5:G0SUB 1148 
238 FOR AA = 8 TO 12 : N CAA) =U cAA) : IF NCAA 

>>18 THEN NcAAi=18 
248 REM COMPUTER'S CRIB PICK 
258 NEXT AA!LL=8:HH=5)G0SUB 2398:G0SUB 
1148:G0SUB 870!POSITION 18,5!? u6:"S" 

:SOUND 8,5,6. 18: AA=AA^1 

268 SOUND 8,0.8.8 

278 HEM COUNT POINTS 

288 REM PLAYER-S CRIB PICK 

298 NN=16:F0R CC=e TO 1!G0SUB 788!P0SI 

TION XX + 1,YY!? «6; POSITION 14 + CC. 

5! ? a6;"S":TM=XX»CC!M0=XX+UO-TM 

388 FOR DD = 1 TO 6l!S0UND 8 . DD , 18 , 8 : NEX 

T DD!SOUND 8.8,8,8 

318 GOSUB 2e68!NEXT CCilF UO=TU THEN H 

H = 5!P05ITI0M 14.5!? W6;" ■■ : UO = ! TU^^B ! 

LL=e!GDSUB 114e:G0T0 298 

328 UO = INT c cMO + l> ^3^ !TM=cTM-l>^3:CRclJ 

=McU0J!CRc2J=McTU>!LL=e!HH=3!G05UB 239 

e!BB=-l:FOR AA=8 TO 5 

338 IF MCAAI-CRC13 AND MCAA»-CHt2> THE 

N BB=BB+1 :MCBB>=MCAA> 

348 NEXT AA!LL=8!HH=3!G0SUB 239e!P0SIT 

ION 13,2!? «6;" "iGOSUB 1148!C0L0 

R KC12>!PL0T 16.7:C0L0R F C12J 

358 PLOT 17.7!IF UC12>=11 THEN UH=CR!P 

T = 2!G0SUB 2898!P0SITI0N 3.10!? tt6;"FK 

EP 2"!G0SUB 2868 

368 HH=l!RC=CR!FOR AA=4 TO 7:McAA>=McA 

A+2>!NEXT AA!FQR Aft=8 TO 11 ! M CAAJ =CR cA 

A-7) :NEXT AA 

378 REM THE PLAY 

388 PS=" "iFOR Afi=6 TO 7!P0 

SITION 1,AA!? «t6;PS!NEXT AA : TT = ! PL = B = 

JJ=l:G05UB 848 

398 MM=l!BB=8!P0SITI0N 9,10!NC= NOT RC 

!FOR AA=0 TO 7 



XC 



KJ 
OP 



MR 
RA 



UX 
SB 

XC 
XO 



UD 
UF 

ZM 

ZT 
FO 
OG 

DM 
01 



CF 

GJ 



EJ 



lY 
EJ 



HG 
SM 



BD 
UJ 

LM 
FI 
BU 
BA 
TT 
PD 

CH 



LT 

OZ 
OR 
YO 
EF 
CH 



FI 
UB 
10 
XN 

UU 
MG 



518 
528 



gEM PLAY i: 
OSUB 2870! 



488 IF NCHCAA>)>18 THEN NEXT AA:UH=RC: 

BB=l!PT=l!? 06;" I"!MM=8:GaSUB 2890sGO 

TO 528 

418 FOR AA=NC»4 TO NC«4+3 

420 IF TT+NCMCAAJ J>31 THEN NEXT AA!POS 

ITION 9.10!UH=RC!NC=RC!? «6 ; " I"!GOSUB 

2868:P0SITI0N 9,18 
438 FOR AA = NC»*4 TO NC»4 + 3!lF TT + NcMCAA 
>>>31 THEN NEXT OA!FF=l:? «6 ; " I"!PT=1 
:GOSUB 2898:GaSUB 2868:G0T0 388 
448 HH=1!P0SITI0N 1,18:? n6 ; P$ = POSITIO 
N 9,18!? «»6;TT!IF RC = NC THEN RC= NOT R 
C!CG=C0+3!PL=PL+l!HH=e!G0T0 468 
458 PL = PL + l!C0 = 3*INTctPL + l>''2> -2:R0 = 7 
468 IF RC THEN R0=6 : JJ=0 : GOSUB 1390:? 

06; GOSUB 2060 

478 IF NC THEN GOSUB 1168 

488 GOSUB 1438!G0SUB 1468 : RC = NC : CT = 8 : N 

CM CAA1>=NCMCAA>>+58:JJ = TM! GOSUB 2868 :P 

OSITION 1,9!TM=JJ 

498 IF TT<31 THEN 390 

588 POSITION l,CLl:? <*6 ; L3$ : POSITION 1 

.RHl:? t*6:L4$:G0T0 388 

585 IF DBUG=8 THEN POKE 16,112:P0KE 53 
774,112 

586 RETURN 
S OUER 

PS = " 

zz=e 

538 REH CLEAR SCREEN 

540 FOR AA=0 TO 7 : N cMCAA> > =N CMCAA> > -50 

sNEXT AA:FOR AA=1 TO 18!P0SITI0N 1,AA! 

? <t6;P$:NEXT AA : NC = ABS cCR- 1> 

558 REM IF ZZ THEN ALL THREE COUNTED 

AND ME-RE READY FOR THE NEXT HAND 

568 IF ZZ THEN ZZ=8:P0P !POP sGDTO 70 

578 FOR AA=0 TO 12 : C CAA> =M cAA) : NEXT AA 

:FOR AA=5 TO 8 : M CAA> =C CA A-l> : NEXT AA : L 

L=18!HH=13 

580 FOR AA=10 TO 13 : M CAflJ =C cAA-2> : NEXT 

AA:FOR AA = TO 2 : BB = AA»»5+4 : M CBB> =C C12 
1 !NEXT AA!GOSUB 2390 
590 REM SET UP SCREEN 

688 RE = 8!L1S = " ! -P :.«■•: L2* = " X! :.»•■: 
IF NC THEN PS=L1S:L1«=L2S:L2S=P«:HE=5: 
PS = " 

618 POSITION 3,1!? «t6:Ll$:P0SITI0N 3,3 
!? «6;L2S!P0SITI0N 5.5:? «6;"cj - , •■ 
620 POSITION 14.4:? «6 ; •'« • ^P" : C0 = 15 : RO 
=5! AA=14 i TT=108!GOSUB 1438 : POSITION 1. 
18! ? »»6;P« 
638 REM COUNT HAND 

648 R0=2:UH=NC!LL=RE:G0SUB ie78!MH=CR: 
RE=ABScRE-5> :P05ITI0N 1,18 
650 REM COUNT SECOND HAND 
660 RO=4!LL=RE:MH=CR:G05UB 1670 
670 REM COUNT CRIB HAND 
680 R0=6 !LL=10:GOSUB 1670 
690 CR=NC:ZZ=l:GOTO 540 
700 CE = 0!XX = 1 ! YY = 3iBB = 0!COLOR 130!PLOT 

1, 3!DD=e 
710 POKE 694.8:PDKE 782.64!lF LP=75 TH 
EN CLOSE «l!OPEN «1 . 4 , . "K : " ! GET «1,DD 
:CLOSE ttl!GOTO 768 

720 5T=STICKC0> !IF ST>8 AND STICKC12 T 
HEN DD=43 

730 IF ST<8 THEN DD=42 

740 POKE 77,0!IF STRIGc8>-8 THEN DD=62 
750 IF ST=15 AND DD-62 THEN 728 
768 IF DD>42 THEN BB=8 

770 FOR ZZ=1 TO NN STEP 3 : COLOR 128!PL 
OT 1,3!IF ZZ-CE THEN COLOR 128!PL0T ZZ 
, YY 

780 NEXT ZZilF DD=62 THEN RETURN 
790 IF STRIGC8>=8 THEN DD=62 
880 IF DD<43 THEN BB=6 

810 CE=XX!XX=XX+BB-3:IF XX<1 THEN XX=N 
N 

820 IF XX>NN THEN XX=1 
830 SOUND 0,DDM3,10,6:COLOR 130!PLOT X 

ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



uz 

XD 



SL 



Pti 

MAY 1989 



X. VV :XX=XX^l:SOUND 0.0,0.8:6010 710 

840 HEM DISPLAY PLfiV ORDER INDICATORS 

850 CL1=5 :RU1=8:P0SITI0N 15.6:? a6;"&. 

'P":IF NC THEN POSITION 14.4:? W6;">'.! 

■•:CL1 = 8:RM1 = 5 

860 POSITION l.CLl:? ««6 ; L4S : POSITION 1 

,RUl:? <«6;L3$:RET0RN 

870 REM ASSIGN POSSIBLES & SORT THEM 

880 RESTORE 2590 : SC=:0 : FOR RP = TO 14 : C 

T=l:FOR BB=6 TO ll:REnD CC : M cBBl =CC : NE 

XT BB:LL=e:HH=9:GaSUB 2390 

890 IF RP=7 THEN POSITION 17.5:? «6;"S 

";:SaUND 0.5.6,2: AA=AA^1 :50UND 0.0.0.0 

900 REM PAIRS 

918 FOR BB=6 TO 8 : IF U <M CBB> J =U CM cBB+1 

>> THEN CT=CT»CT+2 

920 REM CHECK FOR STRAIGHTS 

938 NEXT BB:BB = UCMt6J> :CC = y CMC7> J :DD = U 

CMC8> J :EE=UcMc9>> :IF BB=CC-1 AND BB-DD 

-2 THEN CT=CT+3 

940 IF BB = DD-1 AND BB=:EE-2 THEN CT = CT + 

3 

950 IF CC=DD-1 AND CC=EE-2 THEN CT=CT+ 

3 

960 IF BB = CC-1 AND BB = DD-2 AND BB=:EE-3 

THEN CT=CT-2 
970 REM UALUE OF CRIBS CARDS 
980 FF=0:BB=UCMC10J J :CC=UcMtllJ J :IF BB 
=CC OR BB+CC=15 THEN FF=2 

990 IF BB+CC=5 OR BB=5 OR CC=5 THEN FF 
= FF + 2 

1088 IF BB=CC-1 THEN FF=FF+0.5 
1810 IF CH THEN FF=-FF 
1828 REM 15-S 

1838 BB=NtMce>>:CC=NcMc7i>:DD=NtMc8>>: 
EE=NCM<9>» :IF BB+CC+DD=15 OR BB+CC=15 
THEN CT=CT+2 

1040 IF BB+CC+EE=15 OR BB+EE=15 THEN C 
T=CT*2 

1050 IF CC+DD+EE=15 OR CC+DD=15 THEN C 
T=CT+2 

1060 IF BB*CC+DD+EE=15 OR BB+DD=15 THE 
N CT=CT+2 

1078 IF CC+EE=15 THEN CT=CT+2 
1080 IF DD+EE=15 THEN CT=CT+2 
1098 REM FLUSH 

1108 FOR BB=6 TO 9 : IF F CM <BBJ > =F CM <BB+ 
1J> THEN NEXT BB:CT=CT*4 

1118 CT=CCT-FF>»«2:F0R BB = 6 TO 9 : IF N CM 
CBBIK6 THEN CT = CT + 1:IF NcMcAAi>=5 THE 

N CT:=CT+2 

1128 NEXT BB:IF CT>=SC THEN SC=CT:FDR 

BB=6 TO 11:PTCBB>=MCBB> :NEXT BB 

1138 NEXT RPsFOR BB=6 TO 11 : H cBBl =PT CB 

8>:NEXT BB:U0=e:CRc3i=Mcie>:CRC4>=MCll 

> :RETURN 

1140 PS=" ":P0SITI0N 

1.3:? tt6;P$:F0R AA=LL TO HH : BB=3wAA+2 > 

SOUND 2.BBM3.10.6 

1150 COLOR KcMcAAii :PLOT BB.3:C0L0R Fc 

MCAA>>:PL0T BB+1.3:NEXT AA:SOUND 2,0.0 

,8:RETURN 

1160 CS=-108:FOR AA=4 TO 7 : CT=8 : BB=TT+ 

NCHCAA>>:IF BB>31 THEN 1388 

1170 IF BB=31 THEN CT=CT+5 

1180 IF BB=15 THEN CT=CT+4 

1190 IF BB>15 THEN CT=CT+1 

1200 IF BB<5 THEN CT=CT+1 

1210 IF BB=5 OR BB=21 THEN CT=CT-2 

1220 IF BB=10 THEN CT=CT-1 

1230 IF UCMCAA>>=1 OR cBB>5 AND BB<9i 

THEN CT=CT-1 

1240 FOR CC=4 TO 7:IF CC=AA OR NcMcCCl 

>>10 THEN NEXT CC:GOTO 1340 

1250 IF UCMCCC>>=1 AND BB=30 THEN CT=C 

T + 1 

1260 IF UCMCCC>>=1 AND BB=29 THEN CT=C 

T + 1 

1270 IF UCMCCCJJ=2 AND BB=29 THEN CT=C 

T*l 

1280 IF UcncCC>>=3 AND BB=28 THEN CT=C 

T*l 

1290 IF UCMCCC>>=9 AND BB=6 THEN CT=CT 

+ 3 

1300 IF UCMCCC»>=8 AND BB=7 THEN CT=CT 

+ 3 

1310 IF UCMCCC>>=7 AND BB=8 THEN CT=CT 

+ 3 

1320 IF UCMCCC>1=6 AND BB=9 THEN CT=CT 

+ 3 

1338 NEXT CC 

1348 IF PL<2 THEN 1378 

1358 GOSUB 1590:GOSUB 1640 : CT=CT+ cST+P 

RJ»1 . 5 

1360 PL=PL-l:II=MCAA> :McAA>=CCPL> :FOR 



SN 
EF 
HG 



JF 
AI 

BT 
LC 

DM 

T5 

KQ 

UU 

AL 
MK 

AJ 
XL 
VO 
QB 
UH 
UU 
PZ 
RE 

Ea 

ZX 
OP 
UX 

KE 

LL 
RU 
ZB 

TL 

AK 



QX 
IQ 

TN 



RJ 
ZP 
GR 

OX 



ZO 
LD 



EB 

NM 
IJ 
EA 

NO 

GB 
DB 
TI 



TK 
FX 
NU 



GF 
QG 
XT 



STEP 2:IF AA= 



BB=1 TO PL-1:PTCBB>=PLCBB» :NEXT BB:GOS 

UB 1598:MCAA>=II:PL=PL+1 

1378 IF CT>=CS THEN CS=CT:CU=AA 

1380 NEXT AA: AA = CU:RETURN 

1390 NN=18:G0SUB 700:PO5ITION XX+l.VY: 

AA=INTCCXX+2J ^3J -l:IF TT+N CM c AA> > >31 T 

HEN PL=PL-l:POP :GOTO 450 

1400 IF JJ<3 THEN RETURN 

1410 FOR AA=1+CR TO JJ-2 

JJ THEN 1390 

1420 NEXT AA:RETURN 

1438 COLOR KcMcAAil :PLOT CO.RO:COLOR F 

CMCAAll :PLOT CO+1 . RO : TT=TT+N CM C AA> > 

1440 IF TT<32 AND HH-108 THEN POSITION 

9.18:? t»6;TT 
1458 FOR DC=4 TO 8 STEP -1:F0R SD=2e0 
TO 190 STEP -l:SOUND 0. SD . 10 . DC : NEXT 5 
D:NEXT DC:RETURN 
1460 GOSUB 1590:PT=ST:IF PT THEN GOSUB 

1560 
1470 GOSUB 1640:PT=PR:IF ZZ THEN GOSUB 

1528+cZZ-l>»ie 
1480 IF TT=15 THEN PT=2! 
1498 IF TT=31 THEN PT=2: 
NC 
1588 RETURN 

:GOTO 1570 
:GOTO 1570 
■■:GOTO 1570 
GOTO 1570 
GOTO 1570 



:GOSUB 1520 
GOSUB 1510:RC: 



1510 LIS: 
1520 L1S= 



31 EP 
15 EP 

1530 L1S="LMP EP 

1540 L1S= 

1558 L1S= 

1560 L1S= 



•3 EP 
■4 EP 
■J< EP 



1570 UH=NC:GOSUB 2090 : POSITION 5.10:? 

tt6;Ll$.PT:G0SUB 2e60:GOSUB 2070:POSITI 

ON 1.18:? «6; PS 

1588 POSITION 9.18:? t«6 ; TT : RETURN 

1598 ST=0:PLcPLJ=UcMCAfl>> :CcPL>=MCAfl> : 

IF PL<3 THEN RETURN 

1600 FOR BB=1 TO PL-2 : ST=1 : FOR CC=BB T 

PL:PTCCC>=PLCCC> :NEXT CC 

1610 FOR CC=BB TO PL-1:IF PTcCC»>PTcCC 

+ 1> THEN DD = PTCCCJ :PTCCCJ=PTCCC + 1> :PTc 

CC+1i=DD:G0T0 1618 

1620 NEXT CC:F0R CC=PL-1 TO BB STEP -1 

:IF PTCPL>=PT CCCJ+PL-CC THEN ST=ST+l:N 

EXT CC:RETURN 

1630 NEXT BB<ST=0:RETURN 

1640 ZZ=0:PR=e:IF PL<2 THEN RETURN 

1650 FOR BB = 1 TO PL-HIF U cC cPL> ) -U CC c 

PL-BBii THEN RETURN 

1660 PR=BB«cBB+l> :ZZ=BB+l:NEXT BB>RETU 

1670 DD=3:TT=S0:CO=2:FOR AA=LL TO LL+3 

:G05UB 1430:CO = CO + 3:NEXT AAHF LL = ie T 

HEN DD=4 

1688 REM FLUSH 

1690 PT=0:FOR NM=4 TO DD STEP -l:POSIT 

ION 2.ie:F0R AA=LL+1 TO LL+NN 

1700 IF FCMCLL>1=FCMCAA>> THEN NEXT AA 

!PT=NN + l:? «6;" QTREP ■■;PT:GOSUB 20 

90:PT=0:GOSUB 1970:GOTO 1730 

1710 NEXT NN 

1728 REM 5 CARD RUN 

1730 GG=0:RESTORE 3818:F0R FF=0 TO 4:F 

OR AA = TO 4:READ CC : C CA Al =CC : NEXT AA 

1740 POSITION 2.9:F0R AA = 1 TO 4 : IF CM 

CLL+CC8> J j=gcMcLL+CcAAJ>> -AA THEN NEXT 

AA :PT = 5:G0SUB 1980:GOTO 1838 
1750 REM 4 CARD RUN 

1760 NEXT FF:GG=0:PT=0:FOR AA=0 TO 16: 
FOR BB=0 TO 3:READ CC : C cBBl =CC : NEXT BB 
:FOR BB=1 TO 3 

1770 IF UCMCLL+C C0>>1=UCMCLL+C CBBiii -B 
B THEN NEXT BB : PT=4 : GOSUB 1980:GG=1 
1780 NEXT AA:IF GG THEN 1838 
1790 RESTORE 3040:REM 3 CARD RUN 
1800 FOR AA=0 TO 21:F0R 08=0 TO 2:READ 

CC :C(BB>=CC :NEXT BB:FOR BB=1 TO 2 
1810 IF U CMCLL+C C8l>i =U CMCLL+CCBB>>> -B 
B THEN NEXT BB : PT = 3 : GOSUB 1980 
1820 NEXT AA 
1830 REM 5 CARD 15 

1840 TT=0:FOR AA=LL TO LL+4 : TT=TT+N CM C 
AAl>:NEXT A A : BB = 5 : GOSUB 1990 : EE=4 : REST 
ORE 2980 

1850 REM 15 FOR 2 
1860 FOR GG=3 TO 1 STEP -1 
1870 FOR AA=0 TO EE:FOR BB=0 TO GG:REA 
D CC:CCBB1=CC:NEXT BB:TT=0:FOR BB=0 TO 

GG:TT=TT+NcMcLL+CcBB» JJ :NEXT BB 
1880 GOSUB 1998:NEXT AA:EE=9:NEXT GG 
1890 REM PAIRS 
1988 RESTORE 3888:F0R AA=8 TO 9 : FOR BB 

continued on next page 
39 



16!? »«6;PS: 



,18 !? »»6; 



■J< 



M6J 

«6i 



1=0 TO liREAD CC:CcBBi=CC!NEXT BB 
AR 19ie PT = 8!IF UCMCLL + CC0> j.J=Uct1tLL + C«:lJ 
J> THEN PT = 2!P0SITiaN 4.10:7 «»6;"LhlP E 
P 2":G0SUB 2090:GOSUB 1970 
GD 1920 NEXT flfl 
HB 1930 REM JACK OF STARTER 

PM 1940 PT=l!X=-l:FOR BB=LL TO LL+3!X=X+1 
RP 1950 IF Ucn<BB>i=ll AND S en cBB> > =S en C4 

»> THEN POSITION 5,10!? t*e;"HK EP 1"!G 

OSUB 2090!GOSUB 2010 : PT=0 ! GOTO 1970 
OY I960 NEXT BB!PT=0 
TJ 1970 GOSUB 2020!PO5ITION 1. 

RETURN 
UT 1980 GOSUB 2090 : POSITION 4, 
EP "jPTiGOSUB 1970!RETURN 
GU 1990 IF TT=15 THEN PT=2iG0SUB 2090!PO5 

ITION 4.10!? ne:"15 EP 2"!G05UB 1970 
KA 2000 TT=0:RETURN 
00 2810 COLOR 130:PLOT Xm3+1 , RO : GOSUB 206 

0!COLOR 0!PLOT X»3+1,R0!RETURN 
FA 2028 REn ARROUS -> 
UH 2030 FOR FF = 8 TO BB -1 : RM = RO ! CO = C cFF> «3 

+1!CL=C0!IF CO>10 THEN R0=S!C0=14 
OF 2040 HH=0!IF PT THEN HH=130 
QT 2050 COLOR HH : PLOT CO , RO : R0 = RU : CO = CL : N 

EXT FF:GOSUB 2060!lF HH THEN PT=0!BB=5 

iGOSUB 2060!GOTO 2020 
JI 2060 FOR ZZ=0 TO DiPOSITION 1.9= 

!-PNO>";SCc0>+BD; :P051TI0N 10.9! 

QH [!lli]a";SCclJ+nD!NEXT ZZ : RETURN 
UP 2070 FOR ZZ=0 TO D»3!NEXT ZZ 
AY 2080 RETURN 
MJ 2098 NU=ABStMH-l> !FDR 0U=1 TO PT ! 5C tMH 

>=SCCUHI+1:G0SUB 210e:COLOR DY:PLOT CL 

.RU:SOUND 3.0.8.e:NEXT UU:RETURN 
KU 2100 IF SCcUHi >5C(NU> THEN 2160 
RG 2110 IF SC<MH><20 THEN CL=SC cUH J -1 ! RM= 

0!DY=216 
NH 2128 IF SCtMHJ>19 THEN CL=:19 ! HU=5C cMH> 

-2e:DY=221!lF 3CCHH»=20 THEN DY=211 
SL 2130 IF SCCHHJ>30 THEN CL=50 - 5C cMH J : RM 

=11!DY=216!IF SCCMH»=31 THEN DV=171 
GZ 2140 IF 5CCUHJ>49 THEN CL=0 ! RU=61 -SC cM 

HJ!DV=22l!lF SCCMH»=58 THEN DY=213 
LD 2158 SOUND. 3.9. 8 + UH*»2.10 + HH»2 :RETURN 
EQ 2160 IF SCCUH)>50 THEN CL=8 ! HM=61 - 5C cM 

H>!DY=217!IF UH THEN DV=2ia 
XM 2170 IF SCCHHX51 THEN HW = 11 : CL = 58-SC c 

MHJ !DY=215iIF UH THEN DY=214 
JH 2188 IF 5CtUHJ<32 THEN CL=19 : RU=5C tUH J 

-20!DY=218!lF UH THEN DY=217 
NO 2190 IF SCCMHJ<21 THEN HU=0 ! CL=SC <UH» - 

1!DY=214!IF UH THEN DY=215 
EV 2200 REn IF 5CtUH>=61 
BZ 2218 IF SC(UHl-ei THEN SOUND 3.9.8+UHw 

2.10+UH«2!RETURN 
UX 2228 U=UH:N=NU:F0R SD=8 TO 16 STEP 8-2 

5:S0UND e.l.6.SD:NEXT SD 
UR 2238 COLOR 8:PL0T a.BiDRAUTO 19.0:DRAU 

TO 19.11:DRAUT0 e.ll!DRAUTO 0.0 
OL 2240 IF NU THEN BD=BD+60 
KM 2250 IF UH THEN AD=AD+68 
FI 2268 IF nD>7e OR BD>70 THEN 2310 
TO 2270 SCcUHJ=8!Qa=PT-0U+liPT=SCcNU> !UH= 

NU:SCcUH>=e 
OJ 2280 IF PT THEN GOSUB 2890 
DC 2290 IF 00 THEN PT=aQ : UH=NU ! GOTO 2090 
ZN 2300 PT=0:UH=U:NU=N:RETURN 
UE 2310 GRAPHICS 18 : GOSUB 585!F0R AA^B TO 
3:SETC0L0R AA . SwAA . c A A+4> «2 : NEXT AA:I 

F NOT UH THEN 2350 
HO 2328 ? »6;" GOOD GAHE !!!!". "HCam (OWIS fil 

m CBaaffl HB-;- could be expected ■ "."nFlia 

m am smm mmmamB" . •• matn" 

GZ 2338 GOSUB 2570!lF LP=89 THEN RUN 

OP 2340 GOTO 2330 

YL 2350 ? «6;" BOfflBD fflSlB H BSHH" . •■ 

lEUE I KNOU"." what went wrong 

B m Eims Buam casBB ■■; 

YO 2360 ? tte;"now that i realize". 

n UP AGAINST Gnoii!! r-icmiiiiiki tcoiiuiiiKiiiira 

SB V^N" 
IC 2365 GOSUB 2570iIF LP=89 THEN RUN 
EU 2370 POSITION 4.5:? «t6;" [iJliinaor^SI ! O ! " 
TO 2380 GOTO 2388 
RG 2398 FOR AA=LL TO HH 
JX 2488 FOR BB = LL TO AA-1:IF UcMcAAlKUcM 

tBBJ» THEN CC=MtB8» :McBB»=ntAAJ !HtAA»= 

CC:GOTO 2488 
ZQ 2410 NEXT BB:NEXT AA : H=D : D=8: GOSUB 286 

8!D=H:RETURN 
JC 2428 REM KEYBOARD OPTION. TITLE. 
INSTRUCTIONS, CHANGE 
CHARACTER SET.FROH LINE 10 
HF 2438 GRAPHICS 18:G05UB 5e5:G0SUB 2560: 
40 



I BEL 

". "mtfiE! 

UHO I- 

raraKi 



en 



DL 
XF 
ON 



lA 

JD 
CO 

GD 



DT 



SP 



US 

YL 
PB 
UV 

II 
QC 



Nn 



PL 



OZ 
QE 
TA 



nu 



FQ 



MT 



DI 



EH 



TI 



EP 



RO 



nn 



BF 
LU 
GJ 
JJ 
OP 
CG 

no 

GY 
XA 
TL 
ZB 

nn 

JG 

DC 
KR 
EO 
XU 
ZU 
FL 
HG 
SH 



AA=PEEKC106I-4:BB=AA»256:RESTORE 2620: 

CR=INTcRND t0>»2J 

2440 DIM PSC18J .LISCIIJ .L2Stll> .CC14J , 

UC14» ,S tl4> .KC14J .Ftl4J.M«14>.Ntl4>.PT 

tl4J,CRc4>.SCt2>.PLt8>.L3Scll> 

2458 Din L4SC11J 

2468 READ DD 

2465 IF DD = 72 THEN ? >*6 ; "[a[I!ll@@B(aBani[SB[a 

SncnCQCfllliQlpress J for JoysticK" : GOSUB 258 

8:XX=LP:P0KE 77.126 

2470 IF DD=72 AND XX-74 AND XX-75 THEN 

XX=LP:GOTO 2465 
2480 REn 

2490 IF DD-280 THEN GOSUB 2560:GOTO 25 
28 

2500 FF=PEEK<756>»256!F0R GG=128 TO 20 
STEP 8!F0H CC=0 TO 7 : EE=PEEKcFF+GG+C 
Ci:POKE GG+CC+BB.EE:NEXT CC:NEXT GG 
2510 POSITION 1.5:? «6;" PRESS ARROUS 

FOR"." SELECTION."." INSERT FOR 
CHOICE ":SCC0»=0!5C«1J=0 

2528 IF XX = 74 THEN POSITION 2.5:? «6 ; " 
MOUE JOYSTICK FOR"." SELECTION"." F 
IRE FOR CHOICE PLUG INTO ttl" 
2530 IF DD+1 THEN FOR CC=e TO 7:READ E 
E:POKE DO+CC+BB.EEiNEXT CCiGOTO 2460 
2540 POKE 77.0:RETURN 
2550 REM TITLE 
2560 POSITION 6.3:? n6:"CRIBBAGE 

ATARI! ": GOSUB 505:RETURN 
2570 REM GET AN ANSUER 

2580 POKE 694.e:P0KE 702.64:OPEN al . 4 . 
12."K:":GET «1.LP:CL0SE «1 : ? tte;CHR$cl 
25> :RETURN 
2590 DATA 6.7.8 
6.7.8.11.9.10.6 
.10.6. 7.10.11.8 
2600 DATA 6.8.9 
6.9.10,11,7.8.7 
.10.7.8.18.11,6 
2610 DATA 8,9 



9.18.11.6.7.8.10,9.11. 
7.9.10.8.11,6,7.9,11,8 
9.6.8.9.10.7.11 
11.7.18,6,8,10,11.7.9, 
7,8,9,18.6.11.7.8.9.11.6 
6.9.7.9.18.11.6.8 
10.11.6.7 

2620 REM CHARACTER SET 

2630 DATA 8,8,8,34.28.8,8.8.0.16.0.16. 

8. 12. 126, 12. 8. 16. 24. 0.0. 99. 84. 82. 81. 10 

2.0 

2640 DATA 32.0,60.60.68.68.60.60.0.40. 

0.0.27.27.21.17.17.0.48,0.0.55.66.34.1 

8,98,0 

2650 DATA 56,0,8,236,178.202.170,172.0 

,64,0.0.2 34.74.78.74.74.8,72,0,8,112,6 

4,96, 64,112,0 

2660 DATA 80,0,0.66,69,71,69.117.0.88. 

8,102,102,6,6,126,126,0.96.0.0.119.37. 

38.37.119.8 

2678 DATA 104.0.0.39.85.78.85.37.0.112 

.8,0,39,85.118.85.85.0.12 0.0,0,119.36. 

■3 o T fi "i! 9 ft 

2680 DATA 208,8,8,4,10.8.18.4.8.216,8. 

60.66.66.78.66, 61,8,224,0.0.173.173.17 

1.171.233.0 

2690 DATA 232.0.8.238.132.196.132,228, 

8,24 0,8,96,96,0.8,6,6,8,248,0,68,282,7 

4,74,74,228.0 

2700 DATA 256.0.28.28.127.119.8.28.8.2 

64.8.8.20.28.62.34.119,0,272.0.14.4.4. 

116.36.60.0 

2710 DATA 288.0.8.215.218.178.178,146. 

8.288,0.36.40.48.40,44.36.0.296.8.8.11 

4.69.101,69.66.0 

2720 DATA 304,8,8,214,213,181,181,158. 

8,312,8,8,8 3,84,98,81,86,8,320,8,8,210 

.213.181,181.146.8 

2738 DATA 328.0,0,98,133.133.181.98.0 

2740 DATA 336,8,0,14,10.12.10.10.0 

2750 DATA 344.0,0,115,84,98.81.118,8 

2768 DATA 352.0.0.14.10.14.8.8,0 

2770 DATA 360.0.0.39,82,114.82.87.8 

2788 DATA 368.0.8.50.69.36.21.98.8 

2798 DATA 376.0.8.39,85.86,85.37,8 

2800 DATA 384,0,8,112,88.96.80.80.0 

2810 DATA 392.0.0.116.68.188,68,71,0 

2828 DATA 400,0,0.88.80.112.80,80,0 

2838 DATA 488,0,126,126,6,6,102,102,0 

2840 DATA 416.0,0,83.84,82,81,118.0 

2858 DATA 424,0,102,102,96,96,126,126, 



2860 DATA 432,0,126.126.0.0.0.0.8 

2870 DATA 440.0.0.0.0.0.126.126,8 

2880 DATA 448.0,126,126,0.8.126,126,8 

2898 DATA 456,0,96,96,96,96.96.96.0 

2900 DATA 464,8.6.6.6.6.6.6.0 

2910 DATA 472.0,54,119,127.62.28.8.8 

2928 DATA 480.8.24.68,126,126,68,24,8 

2938 DATA 488,6,102,102,182,102,102,10 

2,0 

ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



KV 
BI 
FP 
BX 

in 

KL 
JF 
BG 



2940 Darn 496.0.24.60.126,126,24.60.8 

2950 DflTn 504. 0.0. 74. 170. 170. 178.68.0 

2960 DflTft -1 

2970 DflTfl 162.0.66.102.152 



2980 DftTft 0.1.2.3.0.1.2.4.0.1.3,4.8,2. 

.2.3,8.2. 

.4 

,1.3,1.4. 

3018 DATA 0.1,2.3,4.8,1.2.4,3.8,1,4.2. 



3.4.1.2.3, 
2998 DATA 8. 
4,0,3,4,1,2, 
3000 DATA 0, 
2,3,2.4.3; 



ID 

BS 
LK 

NP 



3.0 
382 
1.2 
0, 1 
303 
2,3 
304 
1,0 
4,0 
305 
3,4 



,4,1,2,3,4,0.1,2,3 

DATA 0,1,2,3,0,1,2.4.0.1.4, 

.4.0,1,2,0,1,3,4,0.1,4.3,0,4, 

,3,0,2,3,4,0,2,4,3.0.4.2.3.4- 

8 DATA 1.2,3.4.1,2,4,3.1.4.2, 



0.4. 
3.4. 
2,3 
4.1. 

4.0. 
4,3. 



DATA 0,1,2.0.1.3.0,1,4,0,4- 

,2,3,0,2,4,8,4,2,4,0,2,0,3,4- 

,3,1,2,3,1,2,4,1,4,2,4,1,2 

DATA 1,3,4,1,4,3.4.1,3,2,3,4,2,4, 

,2,3 



INSTANT CASSEHE TITLE DIREaORIES 

VCR LABELER 



Article on page 10 



LISTING 1 



Don't 
TYPO 



type the 
II Codes! 



^ 



KI 
PV 
PC 
LL 
MK 
KF 
HU 
HG 

SK 
ID 

VM 



ZU 

ZN 

ZJ 
VH 

TE 



IE 
CV 



lU 
UJ 
MR 

QO 
RS 
RK 

CO 
BZ 



RC 
IE 
PN 

ZF 
DN 

LG 

YD 



PU 
UH 

SO 
JF 

TO 

CP 
GF 



!? :? "HEiramBtimm 

:INPUT «16;C:C 
'Maxinun 4 who 



1 REM UCR LABEL 1.8 

2 REM BV FRANK MALTERS 

3 REM tcJ1989, ANTIC PUBLISHING INC 

4 BRK=CPEEKC53279> <>5i :GOSUB 31088 

5 TVPE=8 

18 IF TYPE<1 OR TVPE>6 THEN 4000 
20 GOTO 1088 

108 ? :? •■nr]an[HB",-z$;"BDBmBnniiDBnB][asBm[!] 
staagQbicaiH" : ? 

118 POKE 752,8:? P$;:INPUT »16;XS 

120 L=:LENtXSJ :IF L<33 THEN XSCL + 1,33J = 

BLScL+1, 33> 

130 IF XSC17,17><>" •• THEN ? -ailfiaH" ; DLT 

«;'• Do not write inEGStHlflTHIS SPACECa-:? 

:GOTQ 110 

140 FOR 1 = 1 TO 33:IF XS tl , I J =••_" THEN 

X$CI,IJ=" •■ 

150 NEXT I:PGKE 752,1 

160 RETURN 

190 ? "[t)ffli9siaffliafflifitfigifflffliaffltsB)gigifflfflBifS0000aaoa 

■■:C = 0:G0TG 220 

200 POKE ?52.8:TRAP 198' 

mmAmsmofrnmsx uauciaaaa"; ■■ 

= INT CABSCCII ! XS = "" 

218 IF 09999 THEN ? :? • 

le di9its.»!lfl919l'- :GaT0 288 

220 TRAP 4O000:IF C<18ee THEN XS="0"!l 

F C<180 THEN XS = "08".-IF C<18 THEN XS = " 

800" 

230 XSCLENCXSJ+1>=5TRSCCJ :P0KE 752,1 

240 TRAP 40e00:RETURN 

300 POKE 752.0:? :? ■■[dfaramrainiaB" : Z$ ; "■EUn 
issBoraacrma Daaaaa-; : INPUT ni6;x$ 

310 IF LENCXSJ04 THEN X$ = "0:OO" 
320 IF XSt2,2>=" ■■ THEN XS C2 , 2> =" : " 

330 IF XSC2,2J<> OR LENCXSJ04 THEN 

? "fflffl"; :G0T0 300 
348 TRAP 48888:P0KE 752.1:RETURN 
400 GOSUB 31Oe0:CLO5E tt4:0PEN tt4 . 4 . . " 
K:":GET «4,K!IF tK<32 AND K<>27> OR K> 
124 THEN 400 

410 CLOSE tt4:? CHR$ cK> ;: RETURN 
500 ? »1;UIDE«;LINE1$;UIDE0FF$;C$ 
510 ? *tljUl$;UIDE$;LINE2$;MIDEaFF$;T$; 
U2S 

520 RETURN 

1088 DIM Nl$cl6a ,N2$ci6> ,N3$cl6> ,N4$cl 
6: ,N5$C16> ,N6$(16> 

1005 DIM X$c33> ,PSC66> ,Cl$c4i ,C2$C4> ,C 
3«<4>,C«C4>,BLS«33J,DLT«C19» 
1810 DIM T1SC4> ,T2S C4> ,T3SC4> ,TS t4> , LI 
NEl$cl6>,LINE2$cl6i,UIDE$c6l,UIDE0FF«c 
4>,B0LDSC4>,P66$C4>,PB8$C4>,B0X$C21> 
1020 DIM TOPS C36> , Z$ cl> , U0N$ C4> , UOFF$ ( 
41 , Ul$ C4> , U2« C4i 
1030 PS = " 

■■ : B0xs = "BHBHeeeeeHeeeBBeeeHeB" 

1040 T0ps=" BfflananmcQSBBaifiiQsmBBmBBaia^miBa 

[■j^nQsnsB- 

1050 BLSC1>= BL$ C33>=BL$ : BL$ C21 =BL$ 

: DLTS CIJ^-Q" :DLTS«19>=DLTS:DLTSC2»=DLT 

$ 

1068 ON TVPE GOSUB 4100,4200,4300,4400 

,4588,4600 

1078 IF TVPE>480e THEN 4060 

2000 POKE 82,2:GRAPHICS 0:POKE 710.194 



XJ 

ZM 
NZ 

NG 
EB 
PI 
IM 
QV 

UV 



GA 
Jl 



EI 
CJ 
EN 
RM 
JF 
RK 

NJ 



HK 
MH 



FQ 
ZG 
EZ 
TU 
JV 
VX 

DU 



RJ 
PG 

GV 
08 
VN 

JL 

ZP 

NI 

RP 

YV 



:P0KE 709.204:PaKE 752.1:? T0P$:60SUB 
31000 

2010 ? :? "[ItmiBSISfBBniDBQBQDSSBiniilBDeimSnBD 

nBgQQ ••; 

2020 GOSUB 408:K=K-48 

2030 IF K<1 OR K>3 THEN ? ••»••.• :G0T0 20 

20 

2040 T0T=K:? 

2100 ZS="H": GOSUB 100 

2110 N1$=X$ C1.16> :N2$=X$C18.33> 

2120 GOSUB 20O!C1«=XS 

2130 GOSUB 300:T1S = XS:? "BI" ; TGP9 : POSIT 

ION 8,2!? "ffl";B0XS;"5l"!P05ITI0N 8,3 

2140 ? "I1";N1S;" "; CIS ; "11" : POSITION 8. 

4:? "ai";N2S;" "; TIS ; "11" : POSITION 8,5:? 

"ffl";BOXS;"?)" 
2150 POSITION 8,7:? "naSBnBIQSBamiBOBtinB 
DnOQlEli:)" ; 
2160 GOSUB 4eO:IF KOllO AND K078 AND 

K0121 AND K089 THEN ? "B"j:GOTO 216 


2170 ? !IF K=78 OR K=110 THEN 2100 
2180 ON TOT GOTO 3000,2200,2200 
2200 ZS="B":G0SUB 100 
2210 N3$=XS cl,16> :N4$=X$(18,33> 
2220 GOSUB 200:C2$=X$ 

2230 GOSUB 3OO:T2$=X$:P0SITiaN 2,5:? p 
LTS:P05ITI0N 8,5 

2240 ? "1I";N3S;" "; C2S; "H" : POSITION 8, 
6:? "11";N4S;" "; T2« ; "11" : POSITION 8.7:? 

"ffl";BOXS;"ffl" 
2250 POSITION 8,9:? "[IDSBQmilSBamiamillllOB 

Daoooar" ; 

2268 GOSUB 408:IF KOllO AND K078 AND 
K0121 AND K089 THEN ? "lfi";!GOTD 226 



2270 ? :IF K=78 OR K=110 THEN 2200 

2280 ON TOT-1 GOTO 3000,2300 

2300 ZS:=:"i)" ! GOSUB 108 

2310 N5$=X$cl.ie> :N6$=X$ C18,33> 

2320 GOSUB 208:C3$=XS 

2330 GOSUB 30O:T3S=XS:POSITION 2,7:? D 

LTS!P05ITI0N 8,7 

2340 ? "U1";N5S;" " j C3S ; "li" : POSITION 8, 

8:? "11";N6S;" "; T3S ; "11" : POSITION 8,9:? 
"ffl";BOXS;"Sl" 

2350 POSITION 8,11:? "Lin^Bnoin^flraratBiaonin 

2360 GOSUB 40e:IF KOllO AND K078 AND 
K0121 AND K<>e9 THEN ? "ffl";!GOTO 236 
8 

2378 ? :IF K=78 OR K=110 THEN 2300 
2800 GOTO 3888 

2988 TRAP 40000:? :? "mtfiEHmW" ; DLTS , " P 
RINTER ERROR - ";PEEKcl95> 

3000 ? :? " aogtaraBSBiarndiDBniiiBriiiBnmn 

■1-1" : ? " [)BBBOS@[§aBBBBO[i]BIJimraianBll" 

3010 GOSUB 4O0:IF K032 AND K027 THEM 

? "ffl"; :GOTO 3010 
3020 IF K = 27 THEN CLOSE «4:CL0SE «tl : RU 
N 

3030 POKE 710,66:TRAP 290O:CLOSE OUOP 
EN «tl, 8, 0, "P ! "! ? ai;BOLDS; 
3040 IF T0T=3 THEN ? Ml ; P88$; : GOTO 306 


continued on next page 

41 



EC 
FE 
BH 

ZI 

IJ 

VF 

BY 
BA 
EU 

n 

NU 



HG 
TH 

EY 

KG 
IP 
RP 

BZ 

UB 



NO 
HX 
ZU 
CU 
ZZ 
II 
OZ 
DJ 

TA 
LH 

BO 



LZ 

FR 
RN 
UP 
GO 
NU 
RB 



3858 ? «<1;P66$: 
3068 FOR 1=1 TO TOT 

3878 IF 1=1 THEN LINE1S=N1« t LINE2S=N2S 
iC»=ClSiTS=Tl« 

3888 IF 1=2 THEN LINE1S=N3« = LINE2«=N4» 
iCS=C2*:TS=T2S 

3898 IF 1=3 THEN LINE1S=N5« = LINE2»=N6S 
: PS = P3S ■ TS — T3S 

3895 Ul«="B":U2*="B"iIF T0T=3 AND I<3 
THEN U1$=U0NS :U2$=U0FF$ 
3188 IF T0T=1 THEN 7 «1;"" 
3118 IF T0T = 2 AND I = T0T THEN 7 ««1;"" 
3120 GOSUB 588:NEXT li? «1;"":IF T0T=3 
THEN 7 «tl;"" 

1118 EtoSrii.?"^" ' *'^' ' **''"■■ 

3158 7 "aB£aB";DLT«; i 7 " ClBaBiaogiSIBDIII 

DKimisigwiiiimisDr" 1 7 •• aasQiiiBiiBiaamscsaa 

mmwsmmamsi" 

3168 7 ■• aBBQISIllBaHBBBBBBHBBBaBBfl" 

3170 POKE 752.1:P0KE 710,194:7 •■7 •' 

3180 GOSUB 488:K=K-4B:IF K<1 OR K>3 TH 

EN 7 "S"} :GOTO 3180 

3198 ON K GOTO 3288,2880.3210 

3288 7 ■•aiS";DLT$; iGOTO 3838 

3218 CLOSE «t4:CL0SE «l:POKE 82,2:P0KE 

752,8'GRAPHICS 8:END 

4808 POKE 710,66:7 "BNO PRINTER SUBROU 

TINE FOR TYPE Q";TVPE 

7 :7 "Select uour printer type.": 
"The following types are avaiiabi 



4010 

7 :7 

e: " 

4020 

4821 

4822 

4823 

4824 

4025 

4026 

4030 

have 
4858 7 
4868 7 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



"TYPE = 1 [ilCanirailinmBiaSDDBSBB" 
"TVPE = 2 S[ii@[I]liJa@DQ[!]B(i!lQBam" 

"TYPE =3 rasmasiDBnisiiaagDaBam" 

"TYPE=4 aQiaEIEimQDDSBnrsimilIBB" 

" T V P E = 5 aBDDICGIBtailimtBmDDSlII ■ ■ 

"TyPE = 6 [(IDBimBBraiaBIilBSIiBBB" 

:7 "Uhat type of printer do you 

ilNPUT TYPE:GOTO 18 

: END 

"HTYPE "J cTYPE-4888»''108;" Prin 

ter has not been tested-Q" 

4878 7 "You Hust delete line ";TYPE+5j 

" before":7 "using this printer sub-ro 

4888 IF TYPE>4008 THEN LIST TYPE, TYPE* 

88:7 :7 :7 T YPE + 5 ; "fflSl" ; : POKE 718,66 

4898 END 

4108 REM OKIDATA 92^192 

4118 UIDE$ = "£SI" : REM 6CPI 

4128 HIDEOFF« = "ai":REM 12CPI 

4130 P66$="S6":REM 6 LINES^INCH 

4148 P88$="H8":REM 8 LINES^INCH 



SI 
GO 
HP 
BC 
C5 
KU 
RH 
LX 
NS 
HZ 
RD 
SO 
BE 
UR 
JV 

EP 

BY 
UF 
UA 

UZ 

ZV 

RA 
BS 
UO 

CB 

AN 

TB 
MY 
HE 
RL 
TF 
BK 
AR 

MC 

FX 

YF 

LN 
OM 
XL 
CU 
EK 
BM 
UN 



4158 B0LDS = "KJ1":REM CB 

4168 UONS = "KIC">REM UNDERLINE ON 

4170 UOFFS = "!eD":REM UNDERLINE OFF 

4180 RETURN 

4288 REM EPSON/'STAR NX-10 

4210 MIDES="BMa":REM 6 CPI 

4228 UIDEOFFS = "SMii":REM 12CPI 

4230 P66$ = "6J2"sREM 6 LINES^'INCH 

4240 PB8$ = "SI0":REM 8 LINES^'INCH 

4258 BOLD$="eG":REM DBL STRIKE 

4268 UON$ = "K-[B":REM UNDERLINE ON 

4270 U0FFS = "S3-B":REM UNDERLINE OFF 

4288 RETURN 

4308 REM GEMINI IBX^STAR SG-18 

4318 MIDES = "BBIJBU[ll":REM 6CPI H2CPI-D0 

UBLE UIDTH 

4320 UIDEOFF$ = "BUII!":REM 12CPI CDOUBLE 

MIDTH OFF! 

4330 GOTO 4230 

4488 REM PANASONIC 1888 

4485 TYPE=4400 !REM DELETE THIS LINE IF 

USING THIS SUB-ROUTINE 
4418 HIDES = "BMHM[B":REM 6CPI C12CPI -DOUB 
LE MIDTH 0N> 

4428 MIDEOFF$="BMW":REM 12CPICD0UBLE H 
IDTH OFF* 
4430 GOTO 4230 
4500 REM CITOH PROHRITER 
4585 TYPE=450e :REM DELETE THIS LINE IF 

USING THIS SUB-ROUTINE 
4510 HIDES = "fiEL:i"!REM 6CPI tl2CPI -DOUBLE 

MIDTH 0N> 
4520 MIDEOFF$ = "tl":REM 12CPICD0UDLE MID 
TH OFFJ 

4530 P66S="BA":REM 6 LINES^INCH 
4540 P88$="BB" :REM 8 LINES^INCH 
4550 BOLD$="BI ":REM DOUBLE STRIKE 
REM UNDERLINE ON 
:REM UNDERLINE OFF 



4560 UONS="»X- 

4578 UOFFS="By 

4580 RETURN 

4680 REM OTHER PRINTER : ENTER YOUR CODE 



4605 TYPE=4600:REM DELETE THIS LINE IF 

USING THIS SUB-ROUTINE 
4610 MIDES = "«BBIfl«ffl"!REM 6CPI C12CPI-D0U 
OLE MIDTH ONI 

4628 MIDEOFF$ = "BlflBn":REn 12CPI(DUUBLE 
MIDTH OFF> 

4630 P66S="BBBB":REM 6 LINES^INCH 
4648 Pe8$="BBBB":REM 8 LINES^INCH 
4650 BOLD$="BBBB": REM DOUBLE STRIKE 
4660 UONS="nBBB":REM UNDERLINE ON 
4670 UOFF$="mnBB":REM UNDERLINE OFF 
4680 RETURN 

31008 JNK=USR CADR c"haBnMhhnnF3SapatfiitUI;W 
"i ,BRKi : RETURN 



LIBRARY OF HIGH-POWERED ROUTINES 



ATARI BASIC ENHANCEMENTS 



Article on page 16 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TVPO II Codes! 



CA 
KS 
ZJ 
AD 
MP 

AG 



AC 
AM 
HK 
LM 
NI 

BR 

42 



18 REM BASIC ENHANCEMENTS 
28 REM BY PAUL ALHART 

2S REM (TYPE-IN UER5I0N BY C JACKSON* 
38 REM (01989, ANTIC PUBLISHING INC 
40 DIM B$(l> :B$=CHR$C34> :POKE 710,30:P 
OKE 7e9,8:P0KE 712,66 

50 POKE ie.ll2:P0KE 53774,112:7 "Hffi 
BASIC Enhancements": 7 :? " 

by Paul Aihart":? 

7 17 " c 1> BINLOAD","! 7J ERROR. 1 



55 
64 
60 

:7 
70 
7 

80 
:7 
85 
,58 
.21 
86 

to 



7 :7 

• t 

7 :7 

t 
7 :7 
:7 
TRAP 
8,15 
88 

POKE 
con 



c 2-i DEC/HEX"."< 8» LOCK" : 7 
< 3> DELETE". "C 9> OPENFILE" 

c 4> DIR"."tl8> RENAME":7 : 
5> DRIUES"."C11> UNLOCK" 

( 6> ERROR", "C12> MRITEDOS" 
7 ,"Vaur Choice"; : INPUT CHOICE 

5e:0N CHOICE GOSUB 188.288.488 
00.600.1900.1700.2080.1888.1758 



764.255:7 
tinue . . . > " 



(Press any Key 



DS 
XE 
ZP 
MM 



DM 



KS 



KB 

FP 

EE 

00 
LD 

RU 



88 
98 
99 
10 
OS 
11 
0$ 

t 

12 
;B 
«; 
13 
$ : 
14 
:R 
20 
«1 
21 
22 
1 : 

22 
65 



IF PEEK(764 

POKE 764,25 

END 
TRAP 40880 
E »»l:OPEN «1 
8 7 i»l;"IF P 
;"BINOT COMPA 
: STOP" 

8 7 «1;"CL0S 
S;"BEnter th 
":7 ";B«;" 
8 7 »»1;"? " 
OPEN ttl,4,0 
CLOSE t«l:7 
ETURN 
8 TRAP 48088 

OPEN ttl,8,0 
7 t»l;"CLOS 
7 »tl;"DIM 
OPEN ttl,4,8, 
5 7 «l;"BEnt 
535";a$ 



>=255 THEN 88 
5:G0T0 58 



:7 "Creating BINLOAD">CL 
.8.8."D:BINL0AD" 
EEK(5576i 0162 THEN 7 "; 
TIBLE with this DOS.";B$ 

E ttliCLR :DIM Z«(18»:7 " 
e Binary File to RUN.";B 

Ex. D2:GAME";B$ 
B$;"SQ";0$;":INPUT nl6,Z 
ZS:Z=U5RC5576J" 

"BINLOAD CoHPleted • ": 7 

:? "Creating DEC":CLOSE 

."D:DEC" 

E ttlsCLR iDN = PEEK(769>" 

DN9(6> ,ZZ$(t6>.ZS(5i.Z(4 

";0«;"K:";BSi":7 ";BS; 

er Decinai Nutiber up to 

ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



230 ? Wl;"? ■■;OS;"ffla";Q$;":DNS = ";aS;"D 

l:DEC";0$;":DN$(2<2>=STR$CDNi" 

240 ? «1;"? ■■;BS;"BBa"jaS;":FOR 1 = 1 TO 

4!ZCIJ=B:NEXT l!ZZS=";aS;"ei234S6789ftB 



CDEF";as 
250 ? «1; 
bsGET «!, 
255 ? »1; 
SCZJ ; ! 
260 ? 
R 1 = 1 
270 ? 



!a$;"ffiD":a$j 



sFOR 1=1 TO 



IF Z>47 OND Z<59 THEN ? CHR 

ZS tI.I>=CHRStZJ :NEXT I:CLOSE «1" 
««1;"? ";OS;"H";aS;"iZ = UftL CZS> :F0 
TO 4!ZCI>=0:NEXT I" 
^.« . «tl;"? ••;a*;"H";aS;":ZZ = INT CZ^4B9 
6>:IF ZZ>0 THEN Z cl J =ZZ : Z=Z -4096»ZZ" 
280 ? »l;"7 ";aSj"H";aS;"!ZZ=INTcZ^256 
>:IF ZZ>0 THEN Z t2J =ZZ : Z=Z-2S6»ZZ" 
290 ? «l;"? •■;a«;"H";aS;"!ZZ = INT tZ/16> 
ilF ZZ>0 THEN ZC3>=ZZ:Z=Z-16»ZZ" 
300 ? «1;"? ••;aS;"H";0S;"!Zc4>=Z" 

310 ? »1;"? ";BS;"aEiaDECII1ftL '■ias;":Z$: 
••;0S;" = ••;&$!": -f OR 1 = 1 TO 4!? ZZSCZC 
IJ+1.ZCIJ+1> ; :NEXT I:? " : US s 

311 ? »1;" HEX";a$ 

320 ? ««1;"? ■•;aS;"aiQffiPress SPfiCE BPR t 
a Continue, "; aS; ": ? ";a$;"H to Convert 

HEX NuNbers,";aS: 
325 ? «1;":? ";a$;"An>i other Ke« to au 
it .";aS;":CL05E «1" 

330 ? «1;"? ■•;aS;"aja";aS;"!OPEN ttl,4,8 
.";aS;"K:";as;"iGET «1,Z!CL05E ««l!"; 
335 ? »1;"IF Z=72 THEN DNS t4 J =" ; OS ; "HE 
X";a«;"!ENTEH DNS" 

340 ? »1;"IF Z=32 THEN ENTER DNS" 
350 CLOSE «l:? "DEC Conp 1 eted ■ " = ? iGOT 
1300 

400 TRftP 48080:? "Creating DELETE":CLO 
SE t«l:0PEN »l,8,e,"D!DELETE" 
410 ? »1;"CL0SE ttl:CLR :POKE 710.66:01 
M ZSC18>!? ":as:"iauhich File to DELETE 
?";0S 

420 ? «1;"? ";aS;"ffi Ex. D2:DnTA.EXE" 
;aSj"ilNPUT «16.ZS:? " ; BS ; "HDel et i n9 " 
;OS;";ZS!"; 
425 ? «1;"P0KE 7ie,148:XI0 33,ttl,0,0,Z 



430 CLOSE «l:? 

RETURN 

500 TRAP 40000: 

oi:OPEN ni,e,0. 



■DELETE Conpieted ■ " : ? 
:CLOSE 



? "Creating DIR- 
"DsDIR" 

510 ? wi;"CLGSE ttl:CLR ? DIM ZStl8JiZ« = 
";aS;"Dl:».»";aS;":7 ";a$;"BUhich DriM 
e7";aS;":0PEN »»1, 4, 8 , "; aS; 

511 ? «l;"K:";aS;":GET ttl,Z:CLOSE «1 s 1 
F Z<49 OR Z>56 THEN STOP " 

520 ? »1;"? ";aS;"S";aS;":ZS t2,2>=CHRS 
CZ>:0PEN «1,7,8,ZS:F0R 1=1 TO 66:INPUT 
«1,ZS:? ZS:NEXT I" 
538 CLOSE »l:? "OIR CoHP 1 eted . " : 7 sRET 
URN 

688 TRAP 48088:? "Creating ERROR":CLOS 
E til:OPEN «<l,8.e,"D:ERR0R" 
610 ? «l;"CLR:CLOSE l»l : DN = PEEK C769> : D 
in DNSC8» ,ZSC42> !DNS=";eS;"Dl:ERROR";a 
S;":DNSC2,2>=STRSCDNJ" 

620 ? «1;"? ";asj"SEnter ERROR » ";OSj 
";:FOR 1 = 1 TO 5:GET ««16.Z:IF Z<155 THE 
N ZSCI.I>=CHRSCZ> :NEXT I" 



638 ? «1 
648 ? »1 
ZS=";aS; 
658 ? ttl 
ZS=";aS; 
668 ? »1 
ZS="jaS; 
678 ? »1 
ZS=";aS; 
688 ? »1 
ZS=";aS; 
690 ? »1 
ZS=";OS; 
708 ? Wl 
ZS=";aS; 
710 ? ttl 
ZS=";aS; 
720 ? «1 
ZS=";aS; 
730 ? »1 

ZS=";BS 
740 ? «1 

ZS=";as 
nderf low 
750 ? »1 

ZS=";as 
760 ? «1 

ZS=";OS 

s 



!Z=0ALCZS»" 
!IF Z=l THEN 



Z = 3 
Z=4 



THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 
THEN 



? ";aS;"HI";BSi 

? ";BS;"B";BSj 
No Error";as 

"? ";aS;"H";aS;" :IF Z=2 THEN 
Insufficient neHory";as 
■■? ";BS;"!I";BS;":IF ~ ~ 
Ualue Error";as 
"? "jaS;"B";BS;":IF _ 
Too Many Uariabl es" ; BS 
"? ";BS;"H";aS;" :IF Z=5 
String Lensth Error";as 
"? ";BS;"H";BS;":IF 2=6 
Out of Data Error";B$ 
"? ";aS;"||";as;":IF Z = 7 ...^.. 
Nunber Greater than 32767";a$ 
"? ";BS;"H";aS;":IF Z=8 THEN 
Input Statenent Error";as 
"? ";BS;"B";BS;":IF Z=9 THEN 
Arraw or String DIM Error";as 
"? ";aS;"B";BS;":IF Z=10 THEN 
"Argunent Stack Overflow";as 
"? ";aSj"B";aS;":IF Z=ll THEN 
"Floating Point Overflow or U 
Error"; as 

"? ";BSj"H";BS;":IF Z=12 THEN 
"Line Not Found";B$ 
"7 ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z=13 THEN 
"No Matching FOR Statenent";e 



SV 

as 

MB 
VT 
IG 
RP 
EA 
BP 
DK 
OG 
MK 
flU 

TI 
XL 
MF 
MY 

HK 
ED 
MU 
UT 
EH 

HC 
NB 
MK 

AT 
UJ 

aa 

FK 
IS 

OF 

PI 

EJ 

JF 

CU 
BK 
ZP 
AT 
RM 
ND 
NP 



NUY 1989 



770 7 «1;"7 ";BS;"H";aS;":IF Z=14 THEN 

ZS="; BS J "Line Too Long";B$ 
780 7 «l;"7 ";BS;"B";aS;":IF Z=15 THEN 

Z$="j BS; "GOSUB or FOR Line Deieted";a 
s 
790 7 «1;"7 ";aS;"B";OS;":lF Z=16 THEN 

ZS=";BS;"RETURN Error";BS 
800 7 »1;"7 ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z=17 THEN 

ZS="; BS; "Garbage Error";BS 
818 7 «1;"7 ";BS; "B";aS;":IF Z=18 THEN 

ZS = "; BS; "Invai id String Character"; BS 
828 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "B"; BS ; " : IF Z=19 THEN 

ZS = ": BS; "LOAD Progr-aj*. Too Long";as 
838 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "B" ; BS ; " : IF Z=20 THEN 

ZS=";eS;"Bad Channel Nunber";BS 
840 7 «1;"7 ";aS;"BI";aS;":IF Z = 21 THEN 

ZS=";OS;"LOAD File Error";BS 
850 7 »»1;"7 ";BS;"H";aS; " :IF Z = 128 THE 
N ZS=";aS;"BREAK Abort";BS 
868 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "B" ; BS ; " : IF Z=129 THE 
N ZS=";aS; "lOCB Already Opened";BS 
878 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "B" ; BS ; " : IF Z=13e THE 
N ZS="; BS; "Nonexistent Device";es 
888 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "B" ; OS ; " : IF Z=131 THE 
N ZS=";aS;"lOCB Opened for URITE Onltf" 
;BS 

898 7 »»1;"7 " ; BS; "8" ; BS ; " : IF Z = 132 THE 
N ZS="; BS; "Inval id CoNnand";BS 
900 7 «1;"7 ";aS;"H";OS;":IF Z=133 THE 
N ZS="; BS; "Device or File Not apen";BS 
910 7 »1;"7 ";a$;"i6";0S;":IF Z = 134 THE 
N ZS=";aS;"Bad lOCB NuMber";OS 
920 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "H" ; BS ; " : IF Z=135 THE 
N ZS=";aS;"i0CB Opened for READ Onitf"; 

as 

938 7 »»1;"7 " ; BS ; "H" ; BS; " : IF Z = 136 THE 

N ZS=";aS;"EOF cEnd of File>";BS 

940 7 «1;"7 ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z=137 THE 

N ZS=";as;"Truncated Record";BS 

950 7 Wl;"7 " ; BS ; "H" ; BS; " : IF Z=138 THE 

N ZS="; BS; "Devic e TiMeout";a$ 

968 7 »»1;"7 " ; BS ; "H" ; BS; " : IF Z = 139 THE 

N ZS="; aS;"Device NAK";as 

970 7 «»1;"7 " ; BS ; "B" ; BS ; " : IF Z = 148 THE 

N ZS="; BS; "Serial Bus Franing Error";a 

s 

980 7 t»l;"? ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z = 141 THE 
N ZS="; BS; "Cursor Out of Range";flS 
998 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "S" ; BS; " : IF Z=142 THE 
N ZS=";BS;"Seriai Bus Overrun";OS 
1880 7 Wl;"? ";aS;"B";BS;" :IF Z=143 TH 
EN ZS=";aS;"Seriai Bus Checksun Error" 
; as 

1818 7 Wl;"? ";flS;"B";aS;":IF Z=144 TH 
EN ZS=";as;"Device Done Error";B» 
1820 7 »1;"7 ";BSj"H";aS;":IF Z=14S TH 
EN ZS=";aS;"Read After Hrite Compare 
Error"; BS 

1838 7 »«l;"7 " ; BS ; "B"; BS ; " : IF Z = 146 TH 
EN ZS="; as; "Function Not Inp 1 enented" ; 

as 

1848 7 «1;"? ";aS;"B";BS;":IF Z=147 TH 
EN ZS=";BS;"insuf f icient RAM";as 
1841 7 «1;"7 ";BS;"B";BS;":IF Z=158 TH 
EN ZS="; BS; "Serial Port Already Open"; 

as 

1042 7 Wl;"? ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z=151 TH 
EN ZS="; BS; "Concurrent Mode Not Enable 
d";as 

1043 7 «1;"7 ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z=152 TH 
EN ZS=";aS; "li legal User-Suppi ied Buff 
er"; BS 

1844 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "S" ; BS ; " : IF Z=153 TH 
EN ZS="; BS; "Active Concurrent Mode Err 
or"; as 

1845 7 «1;"7 " ; BS ; "B" ; BS ; " : IF Z=154 TH 
EN ZS="; BS; "Concurrent Mode Not Active 
";0S 

1050 7 ««1;"7 ";BS;"B";aS;":IF Z = 160 TH 
EN ZS="; as; "Device Nunber Error";BS 
1060 7 »1;"7 ";aSj"B";aS;":IF Z=161 TH 
EN ZS=";aS;"Too Many OPEN Files";as 
1070 7 ««l;"7 ";BS;"B";aS;":IF Z = 162 TH 
EN ZS="; aS;"Disk Full";as 

1080 7 «1;"7 ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z=163 TH 
EN ZS="; OS; "Fatal Systen Error";as 
1090 7 «»1;"7 ";BS;"il";OS;":IF Z = 164 TH 
EN ZS=";as; "Fi le Nunber Misnatch";as 
1100 7 «1;"7 ";aS;"B";aS;":IF Z=165 TH 
EN ZS=";aS;"Bad File Nane"ias 
1110 7 »l;"7 ";as;"Bl";BS;":IF Z = 166 TH 
EN ZS=";aS;"POINT Data Length Error";a 
s 

continued on next page 
43 



1126 ? «1;"7 ";OS;"H";OS;";IF 2=167 TH 

EN ZS=";OS;"File Locked";as 

1130 ? «1;"? ";OS;"H";OS;":IF Z=168 TH 

EN ZS=";aS;"Inual id XIO Connand";OS 

1140 ? «1;"? ";OS;"H";OS;":IF Z=169 TH 

EN ZS=";QS; "DirectorM Full";as 

1150 ? «l;"? ";aS;"H";OS;"!lF Z=170 TH 

EN ZS=";OS;"File Not Found";as 

1160 ? »»1;"? ";OS;"H";QS;":IF Z = 171 TH 

EN ZS = ";OS;"POINT lnuialid";0$ 

1170 ? u±:"7 ";OS;"H";OS;":IF Z=172 TH 

EN ZS=";0S;"D05 1 File";as 

1180 ? nl;"? ";0S;"S";06;"iIF Z=173 TH 

EN ZS=";0S;"Bad Sector";as 

1190 ? «»1;"? ";aS;"S";aS;"iIF Z = 2b5 TH 

EN ZS=";OS;"FORMnTTING Error tDOS 2.5> 

";0S 

1200 ? «1;"? ";aS;"BERROR ";0S;";Z;";0 

S;" = ";0S;";ZS:? " ; 0$ ; "fflBlEBffitH" ; OS 

1210 ? nl;"? ";aS;"ffiDPress SPACE BAR t 

o Continue ■ ";as; ": ? ";aS;"nnu Other KE 

Y to OUIT.";a$ 

1220 ? I*1;"0PEN t»l, 4, 0. "; OS; "K: "; OS; " : 

? ";OS;"ffiQ";aS;"!GET ttl.ZsCLOSE «1 : IF 

Z=32 THEN ENTER DNS" 

1230 CLOSE »«1!? "ERROR Conp 1 eted . " : ? : 

RETURN 

1300 ? "Creating HEX":CLOSE «1 = OPEN ««1 

1310'? «»1;"CL0SE «l:CLR : DN= PEEKC769J 

:DIM DNS t6» .ZSC4> ,ZZSC4J !? ";0S; 

1315 ? «l;"HEnter HEX Nunber to Conver 

t .";0S;" :OPEN «1 , 4 . . " ; OS ; "K : " ; OS 

1320 ? «1;"? ";OS;"BBQ";aS;"!DNS = ";OS;" 

Dl:HEX";aSj":DNSc2,2>=STRScDNJ" 

1330 ? «1;"? ";OS;"[fia";OS; 

1335 ? «1;":F0R 1=1 TO 4!GET wi.ZsIF Z 

>47 AND Z<58 OR Z>e4 AND Z<71 THEN ZSc 

I,I>=CHRSCZ> :? CHRSCZJ ; :NEXT I' 



CLOSE ttl:ZZ 
CZSJ" 

:ZZSH + 4-Z» = 

:Z=ZS=";OS;" 
"»14+ZS=";0S 



1340 ? «1;"? ";OS;"H";flSj 
S=";OS;"0000";OS;":Z=LEN( 
1350 ? »»l;"? ";OS;"B";QSj 
ZS:ZS=ZZSC1,1J:Z=0!ZZ=0' 

1360 ? «l;"? ";OS;"B";OSj 
F";flS;"«15+ZS=";0S;"E";0S; 
;"D";0S;"»13+ZS="; 

1361 ? «1;0S;"C";0S; 

1365 ? ««1;"»12 + ZS = ";0S;"B";0S;"»11 + ZS = 

";OS;"A";OS;"»*10 + ZS = ";OS;"9";OS;"«9 + ZS 

=";0S;"8";0S;"»8" 

1370 ? «1;"? ";aS;"S";OS;":Z=Z+ZS=";QS 

;"7";QS;"«7 + ZS = ";0S;"6";0S;"»f6 + ZS = ";0S 



OU 



EU 
AK 



KR 
BI 
TO 

BG 

FB 
LQ 

no 

JI 

OR 
KT 
CU 
NU 
UJ 
AU 
AT 
LZ 
CT 
VT 
ZE 

BA 















01 


OS; 


•«5+ZS=' 


■;0S; 


.4. 


•;0S; 


*M 




OS; 


•*3+ZS=' 


•;0S; 


•2- 


;0S; 


'it 


ZG 



44 



1372 ? »1;"5" 
4+ZS=";flS;"3" 
2+ZS=";0S;"l" 

1373 ? »l;a$; 

1374 ? «l;":Z=Z«4096!ZZ=ZZ+ZsZS=ZZSc2, RU 
2>" 

1380 ? «»1;"? ";OS;"H";OS;":Z = ZS = ";OS;" 
F";0S;"»«15 + ZS = ";0S;"E";0S;"M14 + ZS = ";0S DG 
;"D"; 

1381 ? «1;0S;"«13+ZS=";0S; 

1385 ? «l;"C";0S;"M12+ZS=";flS; "B";aS;" CN 
»ll+ZS=";aS;"A";OS;"«10+ZS="jUS;"9";a» 

; "W9+Z$="; 

1386 ? »»l;0S;"8";aS;"*8" IE 

1390 ? »!;"? ";OS;"H";aS;":Z=Z+ZS=";OS GS 
;"7";aS;"»7 + ZS = ";flS;"6";aS;"»«6 + ZS = ";0S RO 
;"5";0S; 

1391 ? «»l;""5 + ZS = ";0S;"4";aS; CA 
1395 ? «l;"*4+ZS=";aS;"3";aSj"«3+ZS="; 
0S;"2";0S;"*2 + ZS = ";0S;"1";0S;":Z = Z»»256 NJ 
!ZZ=ZZ+Z!ZS=ZZSC3,3»" 

1400 ? «1;"? ";OS;"H";aS;"!Z=ZS=";OSj" qt 
F";0S;"M15+ZS=";eS;"E";aS;"«14+ZS=";a$ 
;"D";aS; 

1401 ? »»1;"»13 + ZS = ";0S; "C";aS; CG 
1405 ? »l;"»12 + ZS = ";flS;"B";aS;"»»lltZS = 
";OS;"A";OS;"»H0+ZS=";OS;"9";aS;"K9+ZS ET 
=";0S;"8";0S;"M8" 

1410 ? «*1;"? ";OS;"H";flS;":Z = Z + ZS = ";OS UV 
;"7";aS; "M7+ZS=";0S;"6";0S;"M6+ZS=";aS 

1411 ' ? «H; "»»5 + ZS = "; OS; "4"; OS; 

1415 ? ««1;"»4 + ZS = ";0S;"3";0S;"«3 + ZS = "; 

0S;"2";0S;"*2+ZS=";0S;"1";0S;":Z=Z«16: OL 

2Z=ZZ+Z:ZS=ZZSC4,4>" 

1420 ? 1*1;"? ";0S; "!J";OS;":Z = ZS = ";OS;" KE 
F";0S;"i*15 + ZS = ";flS;"E";0S;"»14 + ZS = ";as 
;"D";OS; YM 

1421 ? «»l;"»»13 + ZS = ";0S;"C";flS; 

1425 ? «»1;"«12 + ZS = ";0S;"B";0S;"»»11 + ZS= eA 
";0S; "A";aS; "•tl0 + ZS = "; OS; "9"; OS; "»9 + ZS 
= ";0S;"8";0S;"»»8" 



1430 ? t»l;"? ";OS;"B";aS;":Z = Z + ZS = ";OS 
;"7";0S;"»7+ZS=";0S;"6";0S;"«6+ZS=";0S 
;"5";0S; 

1431 ? «1;"»5+ZS=";0S;"4";0S; 

1435 ? «l;"»4 + ZS = ";flS;"3";0S;"»«3 + ZS = "; 
0S;"2";0S;"»»2 + ZS = ";aS;"l";0S;":ZZ = ZZ + Z 



1440 ? wl;"? 
OS;" = ";0S;' 
1450 ? nl;"? 
to continue! 



•;OS;"SDHEX " ; OS ; " ; ZZS ; "; 
iZZ;";aS;" DECinAL";0$ 
•;OS;"ffiDffiPress SPACE BAR 
;0S;":? ";OSj 



OS;" 


!IF 


Z>=128 T 


aS;" 


:IF 


Z>=64 TH 


OS;" 


:IF 


Z>=32 TH 


OS;" 


:IF 


Z>=16 TH 


OS;" 


:IF 


Z>=8 THE 


OS;" 


!IF 


Z>=4 THE 


OS;" 


ilF 


Z>=2 THE 


OS ; " 


:IF 


Z>=1 THE 


OS;" 
;Z;' 


!FOR Z=l TO 
;0S;" is ";a 



1455 7 ttl;"D to Convert DECIMAL Nunber 

s.";OS;":? ";as;"Anu Other Ken to Buit 

.";0S 

1460 ? t»l;"7 ";OS;"BBD";aS;":OPEN »»1,4, 

0.";aS;"K:";OS;":GET <tl.Z:CLOSE »«1 : IF 

Z=32 THEN ENTER DNS" 

1470 7 »1;"IF Z=68 THEN DNS C4> =" ; OS ; "D 

EC";OS;":ENTER DNS" 

1480 CLOSE »l:7 "HEX CoHP 1 eted . " : 7 :RE 

TURN 

1500 TRAP 40000:? "Creating DRIUES":CL 

OSE «*l:OPEN ttl . 8 > 0< "0 : DRIUES" 

1510 7 ««1;"IF PEEKC18011 >16 OR PEEKC18 

01»=0 THEN 7 ";OS;"SNOT COMPATIBLE wit 

h this D05.";0S;"!5T0P " 

1520 ? «»1;"CL0SE t*l:CLR i DIM ZSclU.Zt 

81 :Z$=";aS;"N0T Enabled";BS 

1530 7 «1;"F0R Z=l TO 8 : Z CZ> =1 = NEXT Z: 

Z=PEEKC1802J" 

1540 7 «1;"? ";OS;"B-' 

HEN ZC8J=4!Z=Z-128" 

1550 7 «1;"7 ";OS;"B" 

EN Z c7»=4:Z=Z-64" 

1560 ? t»l;"7 ";OS;"B" 

EN Z t6»=4:Z=Z-32" 

1570 7 »1;"7 ";OS;"S" 

EN ZC5>=4:Z=Z-16" 

1580 7 ««1;"7 ";OS;"B" 

N Zc4»=4!Z=Z-8" 

1590 7 ««1;"7 ";OS;"B" 

N Zc3J=4:Z=Z-4" 

1600 7 «1;"? ";OS;"!l' 

N Zc2J=4 !Z=Z-2" 

1610 7 »»1;"7 ";OS;"H- 

N ZC1»=4" 

1620 7 «»1;"7 ";OS;"B' 

8:7 ";OS;"Dri«e ";0S; 

S;"; ZSCZCZII sNEXT Z" 

1630 7 ttl;"7 "; OS; "tflMould nau liKe to 

change this set up7"; QS ; " : OPEN ux . 4 , . 

";OS;"K!";OS;" :GET «1 , Z = " ; 

1635 7 »1;"CL0SE «1:IF Z089 THEN STOP 

1640 7 «1;"7 ";OS;"HPress Nunbers of D 

rives to Enable ■"; OS; ": FOR Z=l TO 8:Zc 

ZJ=0:NEXT Z" 

1650 ? »»l;"7";0S;"aBQ";0S;":F0R 1 = 1 TO 

4: OPEN «1,4,0, ";aS;"K:";aS;"!GET«»l.Z!C 

LOSE «l!"; 

1655 7 «1;"IF Z<57 AND Z>48 THEN Z<Z-4 

81=1:7 ";OS;"DRIUE ";0S;";Z-48;ZSC4J :N 

EXT I" 

1660 7 ««l;"Z = l:FOR 1 = 1 TO 8:ZtIJ=ZcI>» 

ZiZ=Z«2:NEXT I:Z=0:FOR 1=1 TO 8:Z=Z+Zt 

I> :NEXT I:IF Z>0"; 

1665 ? t«l;" THEN POKE 1802. Z" 

1670 7 »»1;"Z = USRC58484J" 

1680 CLOSE «»l:7 "DRIUES Conp 1 eted . " : 7 

:RETURN 

1700 TRAP 40000:? "Creating LOCK":CLOS 

E >tl:OPEN ««1,8.0,"D:LOCK" 

1710 7 «l;"CLOSE ttl:CLR :DIM ZScl8>:7 

";OS;"BMhich File to L0CK?";O$ 

?i''22 ?. ^iif,:'.i 'JLi9^i'^^^ E»i D2: DATA. EXE 
";0$;":INPUT WlB.ZS:? " ; OS ; "Loc Ki n9 "; 

OS;";ZSiXIO 35 . ttl , , , ZS" 

1730 CLOSE «tl:? "LOCK Conpl eted . " : 7 :R 

ETURN 

1750 TRAP 40000:? "Creating UNLOCK":CL 

OSE Ol:0PEN ttl > 8 . . "D : UNLOCK" 

1760 7 «»1;"CL0SE »1:CLR : DIM ZSclBJ:? 

";OS;"BMhich File to UNL0CK7";0S 

1770 7 »1;"7 ";OS;"aB Ex. D2:DATA.EXE 

";OS;":INPUT U16.ZS:7 " ; OS ; "Un 1 ocKi ng 

";OS;";ZS:XIO 36 . nl . , . ZS" 

1780 CLOSE ttl:? "UNLOCK Conp 1 eted . " : 7 

• RETURN 

1800 TRAP 40000:7 "Creating RENAME":CL 

OSE »l:OPEN «*1,8.0>"D:RENAME" 

1810 7 »1;"CL0SE «1:CLR : DIM ZSclSJ:? 

";aS:"KlUhich File to RENAME?";OS 

1820 7 «l;"7 ";aS;"aE Ex. D2:0LDNAME. 

NEUNAME";aS;":INPUT ttl6,ZS:XI0 32, ttl, 

,0,ZS" 

ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



VR 
OT 
UU 

XK 

SM 
OM 

YP 

LM 
ZG 

la 

ZU 
IZ 

JP 

VO 



838 

RETU 

900 

CLOS 

910 

149> 

wit 
920 

H t 
'■Thi 
930 

164 
940 

DAT 
t . " 
950 
Key 
n9 ■ 
950 
GET 
970 
F Z = 
4" 
980 
? :R 
008 
LOSE 
018 
1>=0 

thi 
620 

••;Q 
t UP 
830 
9ie 



CLOSE «l!7 "RENnME 

RN 

TRAP 40000:? "Great 

E ttl:OPEN »»1,8,0."D 

? »»1;"IF PEEKC4149> 

0234 THEN ? ••;QS;" 

h this D05.";QS;" :5 

? «1;"CL0SE nl:CLR 

o Disable ERROR 164 

5 will allow Loadin 

? »l;"files that 

.";as 

? »1;"? •■;a$;"ajDSIBe 

A will probably no 

0$ 

? «1;"? ";a$;"SID[£9IP 

to Enable Nornal E 

;0$; 

? »»1;":0PEN <*1,4,0. 

»»1,Z:CL0SE »1" 

? ttl;"POKE 4148.288 

88 THEN POKE 4148,2 

CLOSE «l:? "ERROR. 1 

ETURN 

TRAP 48000:? "Great 

nl:OPEN ttl,8,0,"D: 
7 »«1;"IF PEEKtieOlJ 

THEN ? ";OS;"HNOT 
s DOS.";QS;"!STOP " 
? »»1;"CL0SE <*l:CLR 

by this DOS.";a$ 
? Wl;"? ";Q$;"ai";QS 
Density or ";a$;";I 



CoMPleted-":? 


UX 


ins ERR0R.164" 


NJ 


:ERR0R.164" 




<>44 AND PEEKc 




BINOT COnPATIBL 


pa 


TOP " 




:? ";0S;"8Pres 


TO 


.";QS;":? ";QS 




9 "; 


ax 


cause an ERRO 




aware that th 


VH 


t be 100X inta 






PD 


ress any other 




RROR 164 handl 


OL 


";OS;"K:";QS;" 


SG 


:POKE 4149.44: 


DH 


34:P0KE 4149.2 




64 CoNPleted." 


MY 


in9 OPENFILE": 


AH 


OPENFILE" 




>16 OR PEEKC18 




COMPATIBLE wit 


ZT 


:Z=PEEKC1801» : 


AL 


Buffers are s 




;";Z;";as;" Si 


OT 


NTtZ^2> ;";as; 





2835 ? Ml;" Double Density Files nay 

be opened at the sane tine.";B$ 

2040 7 »1;"? ":Q$;"9IUould you like to 

Change thi s?"; BS; ": OPEN «1 . 4 . . " ; BS ; "K 

:";as; 

2045 ? «l;":GET *tl.Z:CLOSE «1:IF Z089 

THEN STOP " 
2058 ? ttl;"7 ";a$;"BIHow nany Buffers w 
ould you like DOS to set up?";a$; 
2855 ? »1;"!0PEN «»1 . 4 . 0. " ; QS ; "K : " ; BS; " 
:GET <tl.Z:CLaSE «1 : IF Z<49 OR Z>57 THE 
N STOP " 
2860 ? ttl;"POKE 1801 . Z -48 : Z=USR (584841 

2078 CLOSE ttl:? "OPENFILE GonPleted.": 

? :RETURN 

2188 TRAP 48888:? "Creating URITEDOS": 

CLOSE ttl:OPEN »1 . 8 . 8 . "D : URITEDOS" 

2185 ? »1;"CL0SE ttl:GLR :DIM ZScie>:ZS 

=";0S;"Dl:D0S.SY5";as 

2118 7 »»1;"7 ";a$;"llUrite 00S.SV5 to w 

hich driwe?"; BS; ":0PEN Wl , 4 . 8 . " ; BS ; "K : 

";as; 

2115 7 «1:":GET ttl.Z:GLOSE ««1 : IF Z<49 
OR Z>56 THEN STOP " 

2128 ? ul;"7 ";B$;"»iaPut Disk in Driue 
";0S;";Z-48;";BS;" and Press RETURN." 
;fl$; 
2125 ? »«l;":ZS(2.2>=STRScZ-4e> :OPEN ««1 



,4.0.";aS;"K 
2138 7 «1;"7 
o Drive ";BS 



;aS;":GET »1,Z:CL0SE «1' 
;a$;"EeDUritin9 DOS. SYS t 
;ZSC2,2» ;";BS;". ";as; 

":OPEN »»1,8,0.ZS:CLOSE «1" 

2140 CLOSE *»1 : 7 "URITEDOS Conpleted.": 

7 :RETURN 



NO MORE "OOPS, I HIT [CLEAR]" BLUES 

BUTTERFINGERS 



Article on page 24 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the, 
TYPO li Codes! 



t^ 



ZT 
TM 
GX 
EU 

IJ 
PR 

ZL 

RD 

PY 

TH 
UB 

MY 
KB 
PU 

LU 

BB 
YC 

DM 

BK 

MM 



CM 

ua 

AR 
PO 
AL 



18 
20 
38 
48 
OT 
58 
68 
EE 
70 

N 
80 
5 

90 
58 
1 

11 
TI 
12 
13 
14 
se 
15 
C 

16 
17 
2. 
IB 
wn 
19 
1 

20 
MA 
E! 
21 

L 
22 
ss 
23 
24 
25 



REM BU 
REM BY 
REM (c 
REM CL 

HER BAS 
REM CH 
DIM FN 

K(10592 
FNS="D 

AME OF 
? "SCQi 



ITER 
KEU 
» 19 
INES 
IC L 
ANGE 
SC20 
» :P0 
:FIN 
THE 
sk o 



FING 
IN C 
85.1 

18 
OADE 

LIN 
J .TE 
KE 1 
GERS 
DISK 
r Sa 



IF 
J T 
I 
P 
C'S 
7 
P 
7 

St 
8 R 
1 

A 
F 
255 
L 

A 
NEX 
I 
NY 

"!E 

8 I 
INE 
8 I 
ett 
8 
8 P 
8 C 



ERS 

. GEUATGSKY 

989 ANTIC PUBLISHING 

258 MAY BE USED UITH 

RS IN THIS ISSUE. 

E 78 AS NECESSARY.! 

MPSC28>.ARSC93»:DPL=P 

8592.255 
EXE":REM THIS IS THE 
FILE TO BE CREATED 

ssette?"; :POKE 764.25 



=18 OR PEEK(764i: 



NOT cPEEK(764» 
HEN 90 

F PEEKC764J=18 THEN FNS="C:" 
OKE 764.255:GRAPHICS 8:? " AN 

GENERIC BASIC LOADER" 

."BY CHARLES JACKSON" 
OKE 10592. DPL:TRAP 200 

:? :? "Creating ";FNS:? "...Plea 
and by." 
ESTORE :READ LN:LM=LN:Din A$ CLNl : 



R$ = "> 

OR X = 



:READ AR$ 
1 TO LENCAR 



M=LM-l:POSITION 

T-";INT<LM.'10> ; 

S(C.C»=CHRS<UALC 

T X:GOTO 160 

F PEEKtl95>=5 TH 

DATA LINES!":? " 

ND 

F C<LN+1 THEN 7 

S!":? "CANNOT CR 

F FNS="C!" THEN 

e. press [RETURN 

PEN ttl.8.0.FN$ 

OKE 766.1:7 «»1;A 

LOSE ttl:GRAPHICS 



S» STEP 3:P0KE 75 

10.18:? "cCountdo 

I " 

ARS«:X.X + 2>>> :C = C + 

EN 7 :? :? "QTOO 
CANNOT CREATE FIL 

:? "QTOO FEU DATA 
EATE FILE!":END 
7 :? " Prepare ca 
1 " 

S; :POKE 766.8 

8 : 7 "■BOlillilllSDSISB 



SL 


1018 DATA 25525500 




341841658121410260 




825133812169886133 


FJ 


1020 DATA 03225525 




061730090821418858 




806141009882888896 


DF 


1830 DATA 21820111 




0124 62080111691181 




104 64104108084006 


JP 


1040 DATA 00200000 



000608 30060760050062 

06165013141027006169 

013288003 

51201738080021410840 

86169053141008002169 

072173009 

824 8 8162011822400122 

4125200214124 2002184 

224002225 

6 



LISTING 2 



0100 

Olio 
0120 
0130 
0140 
0150 
0160 
0170 
0180 
0190 
0200 
0210 
0220 
0230 
0240 
0250 
8260 
0270 
8280 
0290 
8300 
0310 
0320 
0338 
0340 
0358 



;BUTTERFINGERS 

;aY KEUIN C GEVATOSKY 

;(cil989. ANTIC PUBLISHING INC 



DOSINI 

UKEYBD 

KBCODE 

CHI = 

CH = 

SH-CLR 

CT-CLR 



CT-SH-CLR 



= SBC 

= S0208 

= $D289 

S82F2 

S02FC 

118 

182 



; KB int . vector . 
; Current key . 
;Prior key. 
;Last key. 
;Key codes- 



246 



»•= $8600 

;This progran provides two entry 
;points so that it can be 
;started fron DOS or BASIC. 



START 

JMP INIT 

NOP 

PLA 



:For DOS entry. 
;For BASIC entry 
jw^ X=USR(154e> 



iHakes the progran RESET-proof 



LO 1008 DATA 96 

MAY 1989 



continued on next page 
45 



esse 

6370 
6386 
6396 
6460 
6416 
6420 
0436 
6448 
6456 
6466 
0470 
6486 
6496 
0506 
0516 
6526 
6530 
6540 
0550 
0560 
0570 
0586 
8596 
0600 
0610 
0620 
0630 
6646 
8658 
0660 
6678 
6688 



INIT 



LDA DOSINI ;Get curren-t DOS 
STft NEM-INI+1 ;init address 
LDA DOSINI+1 ;and save in 
STft NEU-INI+2 ;new vector. 
LDA n <NEU-INI ;Put addr of 
STA DOSINI ; new vector in 
LDA «* >NEU-INI ;old vector. 
STA DOSINI+l 
BNE SET-KBUEC ; cJUMPi 



NEU-INI 

JSH SFFFF 



;New DOS init. 



;Junp here on initialization or 
:RESET to setup a new keyboard 
;trap vector. 

SET-KBUEC 

SEX ;Kill IRQ-S. 

LDA UKEYBD ; Save susten KB 

STA SY5KBU ; interrupt addr 

LDA UKEVBD+1 ;repiace w^the 

STA SYSKBU+1 ;addr to our 

LDA n <KEV_TRftP ;Ke!l-trap 

STA VKEVBD ;routine. 

LDA «» >KEV_TRflP 

STA WKEVBD+1 

CLI .-Restore IRO'S. 

RT5 

;Interrupt routine to replace 
;SHFT+CLEAR and CTRL+CLEAR 



8698 


;with SHFT+CTRL+CLEAR. 


6786 


; 






6716 


KEV-TRAP 




6726 


PHA 






6736 


LDA 


KBCODE 


;Get current keu 


6740 


CMP 


«SH-CLR 


;Filter out the 


6750 


BEQ 


GOT-YA 


;standard clear 


6766 


; 






6776 


CMP 


«CT_CLR 


.screen keys- 


8786 


BEQ 


GOT-Yft 




8796 


; 






8868 


CMP 


««CT_SH-CLR ; Check for 


8818 


BNE 


GO-KB-INT ; our special 


8828 


; 




ke« 


6838 


CLR-SCR 


; 


cOHbination 


6846 


LDA 


«SH-CLR 




6850 


STft 


CH 


;Put cir-screen 


6866 


STA 


CHI 


;code for Editor 


6876 


GOT-VA 






6886 


PLA 




.Return fron the 


8898 


PLA 




; interrupt ■ 


8968 


RTI 






0910 


; 






0920 


GO_KB-INT 




0930 


PLA 




;Pass all other 


0940 


JMP 


CSVSKBUI 


;keys on to OS 


0950 


; 






0960 


SVSKBU 






0970 


.DS 


2 


;keybd handler. 


0980 


»- 


$02E6 


;DOS RUN address 


0990 


.MORD START 




1080 


.END 





SHOGUN DEATH MAZE OF OLD JAPAN 



SECRET OF KYOBU DI 



Article on page 12 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the, 
TYPO II Codes! 



EU 
ftj 
PF 
JF 
QL 



SG 
PY 

PC 

HQ 
DU 

UR 

HB 

CJ 
GA 
LR 

FS 

KN 

EU 
SH 
EN 

LD 
GO 

MM 
MX 

CM 
GN 
MA 
JM 
RI 

KG 
GE 

46 



2 REM THE SECRET OF KYOBU DI 
4 REM BY BERNARD TAYLOR 
6 REM cc>19e9, ANTIC PUBLISHING INC 
10 GOSUB lOBOiGOSUB 45O0sGOSUB 6020 
12 POKE 559,R:P0SITI0N R.R:? t<6;A$cS.4 
60>:P0SITI0N R.23:? tt6 2 "X" : POKE 559.34 
:POKE 19.R:TT=3:X=7!Y=2l!XB=X'YB=Y 
14 GOSUB 514 

20 ft=STICKc0J :IF NOT fSTRIG c0> +TUJ TH 

FN Pfl^llR flO 

21 IF TU OR LR THEN ARU=nRM+S!lF ARU>T 
M THEN GOSUB 300 

22 IF PEEKt53279»=6 THEN 738 

25 NX=cA=7>-cA=ll» :NY=cA=13»-cA=14>!lF 

NOT tNX*NYJ THEN 45 
28 FOR DE=12 TO R STEP -1.5SS0UND R.ZB 
0,4,DE:NEXT DE : X=X+NX : Y=Y+NY 
35 U=cX<R OR X>19i+2»«tY<R OR Y>22J!0N 
U GOSUB 60O.6O5:POKE 559.34 
42 LOCATE X.Y.ZilF Z032 THEN GOSUB 90 

45 F1=F1+5!IF F1>F2 THEN F1=F3 

46 U=U5RCSL.5T+112.SL1+F1»8> :U=USRcSL. 
ST+24.SL4+F1«8> 

47 COLOR 32:PL0T XB.YB^COLOR TC:PLOT X 
, V>XB=X! YB=Y 

60 T=TT-PEEKC19> :IF T>-5 THEN POSITION 

5.23:? ««6;T;" •■ 
70 IF T<S AND OIL=R THEN GOSUB 110 
75 GOTO 20 „ „ , 

80 POSITION S.23:? »»6;"0 ■■ s TT = R i LR = R : I 
F HBY THEN RETURN 
82 POKE 710,R:RETURN 
9 U=cZ = 44»+2»tZ=4 5>+3*»cZ=4 7>+4«tZ = 170 

OR Z = 42J+5»cZ = 171>+6»»tZ = 123> 
92 ON U GOTO 120.130.140.150.160.170 
94 U=<Z=90 OR Z=122 OR Z=250> +2« CZ=1 
R Z = 33 OH Z = 129>+3»»cZ = 163>+4»«Z=22U 
96 ON U GOTO 180.210.200.205 
110 F1=R:F2=2!F3=R!0IL=S 
112 IF RBV THEN RETURN 

114 POKE 710.R:L=1242 

115 FOR J = S TO 3:ftStL.L*7>="a.'Q^t3^Q"!L 
= L*40!NEXT J !L = 1240 sGOTO 6015 

120 IF B=14 THEN Y=V*NY!GOTO 142 

130 IF A=13 AND Z=45 THEN Y=Y+NYiGOTO 



BX 
MN 



ZY 
GJ 



RD 

KB 

NU 
UR 

BZ 
BX 



HO 
ZN 
KU 



LJ 



UL 
GB 

LB 



GR 

KX 

FU 
KB 



142 

140 FOR DE=16 

DE.12.DE:NEXT 

142 FOR J=240 

J.10.12:FOR DE 

SOUND R.R. R.R: 

150 X=X+NX:IF 

151 IF NOT TM 

152 FOR DE=15 
0-DE.lO.DE:NEX 
ETURN 

160 FOR DE=15 
.DE:NEXT DE 

161 COLOR 32:P 
R 



162 FOR J=R TO 
164 SOUND R.J 
6. TS-J-'IO 
166 IF J>60 TH 
SOUND S.R.R.R: 
00 

168 IF J=TX TH 
»8i :COLOR 136: 


169 NEXT J 

170 IF TM THEN 

171 F1=3:F2=5: 
X. Y!TT=INTCRN 

E 710.56:OIL=H 

172 FOR J=5 TO 
.10.12:FOR DE= 
R.R.R:NEXT J 
174 TRS=S:GOTO 
176 DATA 108.1 
28.15.144.15.1 
180 KV=cZ=122 
Y>*129»cZ=250 

140 
182 TR=INTCRND 

182 
184 FOR J=4 TO 
=KV THEN 188 
186 NEXT J:GOT 
188 COLOR Z+2: 
HCSCNI -S: ASCL, 



TO R STEP -2:S0UND R.40+ 

DE:X=X-NX:Y=Y -NY: RETURN 

TO 180 STEP -60:SOUND R. 

=S TO 20:NEXT DE:NEXT J: 

RETURN 

SCN=18 THEN 142 

THEN TCC=TC:TC=142 
TO R STEP -0.5:SaUND H.6 
T DE:TM=TH+S:Y1=Y»B+32:R 

TO R STEP -0.25:POKE 712 

LOT XB, YBiTS=15:FR=R:TX= 

150 STEP 2 
4.TS-J^10: SOUND 5.100+J. 

EN NEXT J:SOUND R.R. R.R: 
COLOR 32:PL0T X.Y:GO"tO 4 

EN U=USRC5L.ST+64.5L2+FR 
PLOT X. Y:FR=FR+5:TX=TX+1 



174 
F3=3:TC=14 :COLOR 32:PL0T 
Dce>M5l+15 :POKE 19.R!P0K 
:RE5T0RE 176 

8:REnD SD.TN:SOUND S.SD 
R TO TN:NEXT DE : SOUND S. 

412 
0.0. 0.108. 10. 0.0. 108. 6.1 
62.10 

AND YLM>+33»cZ=90 AND GR 
AND MHT>:IF NOT KY THEN 

C01H6>:IF BOX(TR>=R THEN 

ll:LOCftTE J.23,Zl:IF Zl 

140 

PLOT X. V:L=cY«20J* tX+5>+ 

L*S»=CHRScZ+2> :IF BOXcTR 

ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



,23: 
■:M 



,48 + 
GRY 



:? «6;KEYScKY,KY> 



1=32 THEN BOX cTR}=R:GOTa 550 

198 COLOR BOX(TR>:PLaT J , 23 : TR1=BGX CTR 

> 'HDXcTR^^R 

191 SPL=SPL+5iIF SPL=4 THEN A$c855.857 
>="D ■■ 

192 IF TR1=4 THEH SHLD=S : nSG$ c36> =nSG2 
$(89,1831 :GOTa 568 

194 IF TR1=134 THEN U=USR <5L . ST*96 . SL3 

> :PRL = S:nS6$(3ei=MSG2$cS,28> :GOTO 588 

196 IF TR1=5 THEN U=U5R tSL . ST+184 . SL3+ 

8J !HLMT = l!riSGS(36>=riSG2S C49.75J :GOTO 5 
a a 

198 IF TR1=39 THEN nSG$ (361 =MSG2$ c21 , 4 

8J :flSC3721, 37211= GOTO 588 

288 FOR J=58 TO R STEP -2!F0R DE=15 TO 
R STEP -2:S0UND R, DE+ J . 18 . DE : POKE 712 
,60-DE:NEXT DE^NEXT J:POKE 712, R 

281 POKE 718,56 

282 COLOR 32:PL0T X,Y:COLOR 163:PL0T 1 
2,23:SPL=5!CG=32:MSGSC36J=MSG2SC279,32 
2J :n«cl677. 16771= RBY = S 

284 U=USR(SL,ST+64.SL2+56J :GOTO 508 

285 COLOR 32:PL0T X.V 

286 FOR J=4 TO 11:L0CATE J,23,Z1 

287 IF Zl=32 THEN COLOR 22l!PL0T J- 
ftS <16 74, 16781 =•• Q":nsc855,855i=' 
SG$(36i=nSG2$ c7e,B8i :GOTO 588 

288 NEXT J 

210 COLOR 32:PL0T X,Y:TR5=5 
212 FOR DE=15 TO R STEP -5:S0UND R, 
DE,10,DE:NEXT DE 

214 IF Z=33 THEN GRY=GRY+S s KY=S : IF 
=2 THEN KY=2 

215 IF Z=S THEN VLM=YLU+5 : KY=4 s IF YLM= 
2 THEN KY=5 

217 IF Z=129 THEN HHT=MHT+S : KY=7 s IF UH 

T=2 THEN KY=8 

220 POSITION KY+3,23i 

GOTO 412 

308 RU=INTcRND(8l«4l : RX=RUw7+S : P8$=UPN 

S(RX,RX+61 :SHLD1=R 

385 PnB = OSR (ftPR C-hhhaOJEa jeS[(lHNa3[rjhhBo[]li 

> h hDsoaa . B^ aaffiBEEJfijc ■ saanasiaraaffiasiasiaDaaa 
[nacsaLiniiiaxneiiiaaQisciawi . i6 , 3 , si 

318 U = USRcflDRC" haillSmillDBnDOIIIQDnilEJLatnSBQQS 

PBOHCraEISi" 11 :ET = ZTCRH1 = POKE 77, R 

315 IF SCN = 18 OR FP THEN Yl = Y*»8 + 32 s TH = 

4:FP=R:C0L0H 142:PL0T X,Y 

328 KOL=INTcRND (81*141 +2 :K0L=K0Lwi6-6: 

IF SHLD THEN SHLD1=INT (RND (01 m21 

338 U=0SR(ADR(P$i,PMB,8,ADR(Pe$i,Xl.S, 

S,Yl,7l:P0KE 784,K0L: ARM=R 

332 IF SCN=18 THEN 348 

336 TH=TM-S!IF TH=R THEN TC=TCC:Tn=4 

338 IF TU>R THEN TM=2 

348 FOR Xl=2e TO 222 STEP ETsPOKE 5324 

8,Xl:S00N0 R, XI. 18, 6 

341 IF PEEK(53252i >7 THEN 368 

342 POKE TJ,R:NEXT X1:P0KE 784,R:S00ND 
R , R R R 

350 If'kILL then KILL=R:G0T0 488 

355 RETURN 

368 IF SHLDl THEN NEXT X1:S0UND R,R.R, 

R:POKE TJ,R:RETURN 

361 POKE 623,4 

362 FOR DE=15 TO R STEP -3:50UND R,X1- 
DE,18. DE :NEXT DE:POKE TJ,R:POKE 704. R: 
KILL=S:COLOR 137iPL0T X,Y:NEXT XI 

400 COLOR 137!PLaT G . 23 : t1SG3$ (G-6 , G - 6i 

= "B" 

418 G=G-S:IF G=12 THEN POP :DE=4:5PL=8 

sGOTO 738 

412 L=(Y»«28i + (X + Si+H(SCNi-S!fl$(L.Li=" 

415 IF TR5 THEN X=X -NX : Y=Y-NY 
428 TRS=R:RETURN 

588 FOR J=Y-4 TO Y-2:C0L0R 32:PL0T R,J 
iDRAMTO 19,J:NEXT J : B=S : RESTORE 568 
584 LTH = LEN(|1SGSi+S !ri5GS(LTHi=M5G3* 
586 FOR J=S TO LTHiREAD HUS 

508 POSITION R.Y-3:? >»6 ; tISGS ( J. J + 191 

589 IF nUS=R THEN SOUND R , R . R . R : SOUND 
S.R.R.R:GOTO 512 

510 SOUND R.nUS.lO. 14 :SOUND S,MUS+2.10 
.12!B=B+S!IF 8=62 THEN B=S:RESTORE 560 

512 FOR DE=5 TO 20:NEXT DE:NEXT J 

514 FOR J = S TO ie:SOUND R . C ( Jl . 18 . 18 : S 

OUND S.C(Ji/2,ie.lO 

516 FOR DE=S TO 25:NEXT DEsNEXT J 

518 FOR DE=S TO 40:NEXT DE:SUUND R,R,R 

.R:SOUND S . R. R . R : SOUND 2,R,R.R 

520 IF EOG THEN 740 

521 IF NOT BGN THEN BGN=S:RETURN 

522 POSITION R,R:? n6 ; A$ (H (SCNi , H (SCN+ 



KU 
EQ 

BM 
EA 



PM 



JD 



PX 

AE 
HR 
RT 

PE 

EY 

YL 
PA 
RO 
ZO 
UC 



AQ 
AD 
CI 

UH 
SY 
GL 

ZO 
JL 

nu 

GH 
AU 
LU 

ZX 

EC 

HU 
CA 

OD 
5E 



QK 
UO 

OU 
HD 

RR 
DY 

BS 



PG 

on 

ZO 
ST 

uu 

XC 

on 

TJ 



Sii :X=X-NX : Y=Y-NY 

524 POKE 19.R!TT=T!RETURN 

550 COLOR 32SPL0T J.23:F0R DE=15 TO R 

STEP -e.2:S0UND . 240 . 12 . DE : NEXT DE 

552 X=X-NX i Y=Y-NV:RETURN 

560 DATA 152.152,136,136,114.114.136.1 

21,136,152,182.204.230.230.238,284.182 

.182.152.136.136.284.182.182.204 

565 DATA 284.182.284.238.238,284.182,1 

52.136,204.284.136.152.182,284.238.230 

.0.8 

578 DATA 238.204.204,182.182.152.136,1 

36.204.136,152.182.204.204.236.204.284 

.182.284.136,136.152.182.182,204 

575 DATA 230.230.204,182.152.136.121.1 

36.114,114,136,136.152.152 

600 X = 20M(X<RlHhcX>19i -S:GOTO 610 

685 Y=23»(Y<Rl+(Y>22i-S 

610 POKE 559,R!FLIP=2«(X=19i-2MCX=Ri+6 

»»(Y = 22i-6»(Y = Ri :SCN = SCN+FLIP 

612 IF SCN=20 THEN 700 

614 POSITION R.R:? tt6 ; A$ (H (SCN> , H (SCN+ 

Sii ! XB=X! YB=Y 

620 IF SCN=18 THEN 635 

625 IF TU THEN TU=R:GOTO 648 

630 IF TM THEN FP=S 

632 RETURN 

635 U=U5R(SL.ST+96.SL3*CGi :U=USR(SL,ST 
*104,SL3*CGi :U=USR(SL.ST+88.SL3+CG1 : TU 
= 1 

636 IF T>S THEN LR=S!Tn=35 

637 RETURN 

640 IF T<S AND NOT RBY THEN POKE 710. 
R I ARM=R 

642 U=USR(SL,ST+88.SL3+16l !LR=R:TM=4 
650 IF PRL THEN U = USR (SL . ST + 96 . SL31 
655 IF HLMT THEN U = USR (SL. ST + 104 , SL3 + 8 
1 

668 RETURN 

788 POSITION R.R:? «6 ; "H" : Y=10 : E0G=5 : P 
OKE 710.282:POKE 708,136:POKE 789,56 
782 COLOR 15:PL0T R,R:DRnMTO 19,R:DRAH 
TO 19.22:DRAUT0 R,22:0RAUT0 R.S 
784 DRAUTO 18.S:DRAUT0 18.21:DRAUT0 S. 
21:DRAUT0 S.S:POKE 559.34 
718 IF 5PL<5 THEN nSG$ (36i =t1SG2$ (118. 2 
481 :M5G3S(8.14l="BBBBBBB":G0T0 588 
712 nSG$(36i=nSG2$(118.167i :MSG$(86l=n 
SG2$(249.438l : U = USR (SL , ST + 64 , 5L2 + 561 :G 
OTO 500 

730 FOR JJ=S TO 7:F0R J=-15 TO 15 STEP 
DE:SOUND R , 182 . 18 . 15- ABS ( Jl : SOUND S,2 
43,10,15-fiBS(Ji 

735 POKE 708,15-ABS(Jl :NEXT J:DE=DE-0. 
S^NEXT JJ 

736 FOR DE=5 TO 250:NEXT DE 
738 POSITION H,R:7 *t6 ; "Bl" : POKE 708.288 



POKE 718.56 
748 IF SPL=5 
741 POSITION 
ION 2.5:? tt6 
ON 2.7:? «6; 



THEN 800 

6.3:? it6;"!«ou have":POSIT 

"failed to rescue" : POSITI 

^ . the [iBma amiBiiicsD" 

742 COLOR 137:PL0T 7.10:DRAUTO 13,10 

750 POSITION 3.13:? it6;"PRESS SaSSSB TO 
":P05ITI0N 5.15:? »6;"PLAY AGAIN" 

751 FOR DE=1 TO 300:NEXT DE 

752 IF PEEK(53279i=6 THEN POKE 559. R:? 
tte; "H":GOSUB 5000:G0SUB 6020:GOTO 12 

754 GOTO 752 

800 POSITION R.R:? »»6 ; "H" : L = S : T = -0 . 35 : 

Y=3:P0KE 709.14 

805 FOR PP=S TO 6 : KOL=INT (RND (01 wl4i +2 

:KOL=KOL»16-2!FR=R:TX=15:K=10:U=U5R(SL 

.ST+64.SL2+641 

818 FOR J=38 TO 15 STEP -S:COLOR 8:PL0 

T K.J~8:S0UND 8 . J + J»»2 . 4 , J- 15 : COLOR 32: 

PLOT K,J-8 

815 K=K+T:SOUND R. R . R. J-15 : NEXT J:T=T+ 

8.12 

828 U=USR(SL.ST+64.SL2i :POSITION L+2.Y 

:? «»6;"Hn":P0SITI0N L + S,Y + S:? «»6 ; "BBBP 

":POSITION L + 2,Y + 2:? «»6;"BH" 

825 FOR U = 5 TO 65 STEP INT (RND (Oi +2i +2 

.5 

838 SOUND R. U.4, (6e + RND(8i+58i ^U :SOUND 

S,U + 128,8. (SewRND (8l+58l''U 
835 IF y>TX THEN U = USR (SL , ST + 64 , 5L2 + FR 
»»8i:FR = FR + S:TX = TX + 10:KOL = KOL-2:POKE 71 
1,K0L 

848 NEXT U:? *t6 ; "H" : SOUND R,R.R.R:SOUN 
D S. R.R.R:POSITION 4,4:? tt6 ; D$ (S , Ll : L= 
L + 2 
845 FOR DE=S TO 12e:NEXT DE:NEXT PP 

continued on next page 

47 



EF 
UD 



HR 
AH 
QE 



OZ 
CJ 
GT 

48 



;DS="s h o 9 u n" 

!P=3eiin=4ei!Tj=53 



FOR J=R TO 5:RE0D SH : BOXl c Jl =SH : N 



850 FOR DE=15 TO H STEP -O.lsPOKE 709, 

DE:NEXT DE:GOTO 750 

1000 R=e: S=l:GRAPHICS R:POKE 559,R:P0K 

E 710,R!POKE 752,S:DL=PEEKCS60»+256*PE 

EKcSeii :COLOR 32sPL0T 2,R 

1002 POKE DL+6,5sP0KE DL+15,5 

1005 FOR J=8 TO ISiPOKE DL+J,6!NEXT J: 

POKE 70B,104:POKE 709,200:POKE 711.104 

: POSITION 5,3:? tt6;"THE SSaSUn" 

1010 POSITION 9.4!? tt6; "OF": POSITION 6 

.5:? *te;"K!IObU di" 

1820 POSITION 11.6:? M6;"Bw Bernard T 

ay lor" 

1025 COLOR 115:PL0T 2.S:DRni4TO 37.S:PL 

OT 6.7:DRAUT0 33.7:P0KE 559.34 

1100 DIH ASC41401 ,B$C460] ,KEV$C8> .ROYS 

€4 81 ,MSG$c300> .nSG2$c4 70> .nSG3$c22> .ZT 

(4i.BOX(5>.BOXlc5>.Ccl0>.Dc8i .H(22> 

1105 DIM CHG$c40i .DSclli .UPNS C281 .TOR$ 
C25J .T0R2$c48i .XPLSc72J.P0Sc73.PSt92> : 

UPN$="0E]S7f[!]aaDC]nnB!naw£6efiNLiBn2iS2Bn" 

1106 DIM CSETSC171> 

1107 KEYS = "! ! 1B» on- 
1110 n=S:N=10l:0=281s 
278 

1150 CSET$<1.85>="[Bn R-RXBHSXnaiHBit 8ffiaiB 
HZfZf <eaSOBDQT[E[!]iaiSS> : s : essasDOSEiKisaBiin 
namiBnciniiaDn i BSBsaaaaaaffiaB < u " 

1160 CSET$c86.171>="JUJ<BE:ii]BDDDDBainaiB0 
□□DBHaBBBBBBBBDaiBOaDOBaiBBB < f f f f < B : OaiBcB 

iaa?;B<flS]z4e<<?nnflBi:Eia?=Bfl>UK>£a" 

1200 ST=CPEEKC742J-2>»«256:CH = S:U=8 
1210 XSR=57352:XDS=ST+8:XCNT=504:GOSUB 

31000:RESTORE 4100 
1212 PCSET=fiDRcCSETS> :FOR X=l TO LENcC 
SETSJ STEP 9 
1215 OFFSET=ftSCcCSETScX.XJ» 

1220 XSR=tPC5ET+X» : XDS=0FFSET»8+ST : XCN 
T = 8 

1221 GOSUB 31000 

1222 NEXT X 

1223 FOR J=2 TO 19 : READ SH : H c J> =SH : NEX 
T J 

1224 FOR J=R TO 3 : READ SH : ZT ( Jl =SH : NEX 
T J 
1225 
EXT J 

1226 T0Rs="hhii[iha[aha[ah9[iiBBDQni;[aB]sa[a[!]S" : 

SL=ADRCT0R$1 

1227 T0R2S = "BBBBi]SeBBBBBa)SfflfflBBBBIilSfflBCt 
hBffiSfflBt tNBffiSBfflS . tBaiSBffl" : SL1 = ADR tT0R2Sl 

1228 CHGs= "aJDBDBBnnBnBBaBaaisaaaLiaasaiBO 

DDBOaiaiBIiJDQCgBIIl" : SL3 = ADR (CHG$l 

1229 ps = --hhn[UhaaaBO[[iD(iihhaha[Bha[ahhE3B[ahh 

□aQhhDssBDSBeBziDEiiDiJssaciansnDniDniDBiiiaGtriE] 
[dQh hamh has[i]a[an[i]smDnDmE][HE]aB" 

1232 XPL$ = "BB$B<nBBBS&Z4RXB a.U5:|IB[BLH 

^5ai»JL[£[EC:J!SII][El! [DLB^5a]SLB[I]aBniB8BBfl[ll[BBBBB 

BBaSSBBB" : SL2 = flDR CXPLSl 

1236 RBVS = "BBBB8T8aSBB CD8[rB9!BT cn81l8BBflB 

B8T8£BBcD8[II8)£aT CDaOJBB" : SL4 = ADR cRBVSl 

1238 FOR J=S TO 10:READ SH : C c Ji =SH : NEX 

T J 

1240 MSG$=" VOU HAU 

E FOUND " 

1242 nSG2S = "EliaDx[TlDr[]E]QxB[l>'.linmSfJm>'-qn9Kvd 

fwffiaxvr JwaxJO'.opMqifffixqMBxb JiaSKxnSihB 

qx JcxqwpqnxdXidwbaexwpsIlx" 

1244 I1SG2$ C891 ="DXF JHH JKxUMLelAxDKXcHU 

Qsx.GJixBncxUcFUeaxMLALKBxUlDFexJCxdlDBIB 

[axfTlHy. y. ■/. y. y.y.r.y." 

1246 HSG2$ cl58i="ncxlDP8nUxGeFDPUi!XNjp 

xlDFNxQncxJKcxanLKBxanDBxFJPIflxACCcDOX 

nLHxxxxxxxxDKAxaneKxMcxNLIIUxsJP" 

1248 11562$ c249i="PK0LIx|lexKJaL Feu XQMDO 

xsJPxMOSexqHffiXdiiBuaBBIlKbawpgfroxilSx Jcxq 

MSxrannrfiBxBigBBEiisix x x ■• 

1250 t1SG2$ C326J ="xxxxxxxonnBraiaxB[lxG JRUX 

BRLFcxDKAxoneKxxxxxxxxFJHHLQUxMDUOxNLU 

Lxxxxxxxx" 

1252 nSG2$ c394i="IIJpXndsSxupf fSBuvcPiiX 

X wffiu f pffia X q HijxBrrEinxEiEiraiaiiia" 

1254 U:=usRcADRc"hhiinhaiaha[Shaii]hharaansQiQ 

□n[3E[i:iR[aiii[iiE]oiiBB[as(i][3Bn[aEriir:[aGnE[j][!]ie"i . adr en 

SG2$l .LENcnSG2$i .51 : RETURN 

2999 END 

3028 RETURN 

4100 DATA 1.460,461.920.921.1380,1381. 

1848.1841.230 0.2381.2760,2 761,3220.322 

1,3680,3681,4140 

4105 DATA 3.5,3.5.4,4.5 

4110 DATA 4.5.39,134,32,32 

4120 DATA 152.136,204,204,136,152.182, 

204,230,230 



RH 



ER 

VG 
MH 



EZ 

LS 
OE 
RA 

OK 

SJ 

DL 
TC 
IC 
ET 
IB 
SO 
CU 
XX 
PR 
DK 
6C 
KN 
NP 
GL 
KS 
CN 
OF 
EX 
UA 
NA 
NF 
AX 
AL 



5080 AStMl=".''' y y y y y y yyy-yyy 
yyy yy y o y y yQy - y y y.yyy 

-y.yyyy y yyy,yy Mi y y ES /* Q 

5005 0SCN1="^' 
yyy-yyy 
□ □ ^ Qy 
5010 ASCOi="^^ 
y y yay , y y y 
y y y 

5015 AScPl=" y yyyyy y y yyy-yyy 
' • Q y Q'' •' y yyy,y y y y.yyy 

y y - y^ y y y y 
5020 AS tOl ="•'•'''•' yy-yyyyy yyy Qy 

Q yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy 

•y y y y y y y y y y / y 
y y y y / y 



4500 FOR JJ=5 TO S : FOR J=-15 TO 15 : SOU 
ND R,20e,lO,15-ABS(Ji :SOUND 5,243,10,1 
5-ABScJi 

4502 POKE 711,15-AB5cJi :NEXT J!NEXT JJ 
:POKE 711,104 

4503 FOR DE=1 TO Be:NEXT DE 

4505 GRAPHICS 17 : POKE 559,8:P0KE 756,5 
T'256 



y y y y 
y yQy - y 

a y y ay 

y y y'M liyy.yyy y 
yy,yyyy-y yyy yyy y 
yyy-yyyyy yyy-yyyyy 
(2 13 yyy 

□ y y y , y y y y y y y y 
yyyyy, yy,y y ,yy y 

y yyyyy y y yyy 
y y y y , y y y y 

Q^ y Uit\y ymy 



yQy 
yay 



/ ya ay y 

y y y y y 
y y y - y y y •• 
y y a ' y ' 
y y y y y y - y y 



- y y y y y y y y 

O \2 y y y 

y 

y y y [3 



y y 

I yyy 



ya 



y y" 
y ya 
y y 
y -" 



ay 



• y y y y y y 

' yay yy 

y yyy yyy y •• 

y y , y yyy y y □ 
y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y"\f^9 



5180 OScMi=" 

a y y ^ y y □ 

y y - y y y Q y y y ^ 

5105 B«cNi="^^,^ .' 
y y y y y y y - y y 
• S3 yyy y 

5110 BSC01=" -' 
yyy y , y y y Sy y y 
yyy-y, yyyyy y y y 

5115 BstPi="^ yyy 

y a Sy . yyyyy yyy 

y y a yy yyy yyy 

5120 B* coi ="'^'' . ' 

/ Q y 

c461i=B$ 

5200 B9CM1="^ y y yy 

y , y y y yyy yQ 

y y yyy yyy ya 

5205 BscNi="^ ay a y 

y y y y Q y y y y 

-yyy,y-y y y y Q 

5210 OS tOi ="''-^'' yy-y 
y ya y y y y y y y ZSI' 

□ / // • // // y , y y y y y y y y y y 

5215 BScpin"/" Q y y y y , y y y y y^yaya 

yfiy y y C3 ' CJ ' yy y y y y yaya 

yayay y yy y-yaa y □ y y y y ■• 

5220 OS cOi ="^Q^Q'ES^Q'^ '' yy yyyyy 
Q yy y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y" if^9 
C9211=BS 

5300 BscMi=:"^^ yy y yy 
yyy-y y aWiy y , y y - y y 

y yyy-yyy-y yyyyy 

5305 BSCN1=" yyy 
ay y y y 

E3 y y yyyyy 
5310 BStOi="^^^^ 
yyyyyyyy y y y y y y y 

a Z y y y y y y 
5315 BSCP1=" 



y - y 

y .y- 

y y 



y y yyy y y 

yyy y y 

y y ay" 

- y y y y - y y y 

y yyyyyyy,y 

y y y y yyy" 

a y y y y 

yyyyy y y y y y 



y y y y 



-yay 
yyy 



y my yay 

y y y y yay y 
y yyy yyy-y a 
ffi/ y y y y y y yyy 

a a y y 

yyyyy y y Q yyy 

yyy y y yg yyy y 

ya yy yyy-yyyyy y yay y y 
§11 yy,yy-yy Q yyyyy 

y y y y 13 y y y y y y y y 

y y y.yyy y - y - y y y 



□ 

y 
y 

y 
y 



: A$ 

y yay , y 



y , y is y y ■ 

5320 BStai=".'^ 

y ay yyyyy y yyy y 
C13811=BS 

5400 f\%mt="y y yyy yyyyy 
yyy y ^ y y Q gg/' y yyyyyyy yyy 

yyyyyy • i2 S3 y-yy y y y - y y y y 

y y y y y - y y y y y y 

yyyyyy Q 

yyy yyyyy y y-yyy y •• 

Ea ay yyaayyyyy yyyy 

yy y , y y y y y y yyyyy 
y fjy y y yQy ~ y y y y , y 

y y , y E3 ly y y 

y y , y y y IS y 

y-yy Hy y - y •• 

yyyyyyyy y,y-y-yy y 

y y y y y y y t A$ 



y y yyyy 



5405 B$<Nl= 

y y y ^y , y y y y y y y • y 

y y .y 

5410 BScOi=" 
yyy 

y y y f3 y-z 

5415 BScPl="x/x Xiy 

• SI yyyyyy yyyyyy 
y O yyy, yyyy 

5420 BSC01=" 
y y - y y y 

C1841l=BS 

5500 BS<m="x y 

y yQy y yy yyyy o y y y y 
yy y,y yyyyyyy yy y 
5505 BSCN1="^ yyyyy, yy 
yyyyyy y y y yQ y 

y y y yyy yyy y,y-yy 

5510 Bscoi="^ ym y y ya y 
y y y y y,yyyyy yyyy y y Q' •'S yy 

y y ay y y yay y y yyyy y yy •■ 

5515 BS«Pi="'' yyy yyy yyyyyy 

a yyy-yy,y y ay y y y yyyy y 

13 • yyyyyyy y y 



y y ■ 



y y y y y y y y y y 

y n y y 

yyy [2 ■■ 

yyyyy Q Q 
y y yyyy /g 
y - y , y y 

yyy, ywa 



y y y - y y yyy 



ANTIC SOFTWARE LIBRARY 



5520 BSC0>=' 

f2301J=BS 

5600 B$cn>=' 

-' */• □ 

5605 B$CN>=:- 

y / ^ / /I 

5610 BStBJ=- 



/ / / / // / / / // //' 

//// / / □• /// /// y 
/ / / / / / / / / y 

/ /H/ / / / / y y y yy , 
yy y-yyyy,yy-yy y y y 
yy y Q £3 

y yyy,yyyyyy y 
y y y y y - y y 

y y yyy-yyyy 
y y ^\y y 



OS 



LISTING 2 



y 

□ ■' 
yQy 



5615 B5CP> 

yy-y y y-y Qy y y y fs y y y 

y yyyyyyyy y^y □ yy □ 

5620 QS tQi="y y -y y y y y Qy , y y y 

y O^ ' ^' yyyyy yy y yy y y y 

C2761J=B« 

5700 ^% iWi -'• y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y 



y y , y y 
y y y y y 
y y y y " 
y y y y , y 
y y y y y y y 
y y y y 



■■as 



y y y y y 



y y y 

yya a 



y y y 

a a 



y y 



. y y y 



y y y •Qx y , y 
y y y , y y y y y - y 



□ 



y y 
y yfiy 
5720 



• y 



■ y y 

y 

y y y y 
y y y y y 
yyyyy 



y 

■as 



'yy-y 
• . y y y ■ 



■ y y y y 

y y y - 

• y 

- y y y 

' -^ . 

- y y 



y y 



yy y y ygy 

5705 BSCM>=" 
y y a '' ^ 

^ ^SISI a y y y y 
5710 BS<B>="''''. '-■'^^'' 
• y-yyyyyy-yyyyyy-y 
y yyyyy y yy Q •/ y y y 

5715 BS tPi -"y y y.yy yyyyQ ^^ 
[B •EJ yyyyy □• y y yy y 
y - y y ^Bl y y y D 
BS tOJ =•■•/'/' yyyy-y 
y y yyyyy 

C3221J=BS 

5800 fts tm =" y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y « » 
y a I » y y y yy,y y - y - y , y yyyyyy 

-y y y y y y »yy,y,yy-,y yyyy 

5805 B$CN>= 
y , y , y y y y , y 
« y tt y - 
5810 BSC0>=" 
- y y y « » 
M y * y * 

5815 BSCPJ-" 
y - y y y yyyy 
*» y-yy-y,yy-y 

5820 B*cn»="^-^ 
y y tt » y y y 

t3681>=BS 

6000 FOR J = R TO 5:B0XCJ>=B0X1CJJ :NEXT 

j!U=U5RcSL.ST+80,5L3+16»:U=USRcSL.5T+9 

6,SL3+24J !U=USRc5L,ST+104.5L3+24> 

6005 POKE 708,B:POKE 709,26:PaKE 710.5 

e:POKE 711,14 :5CN = 2:ftRM=:R:FP = R 

6010 TC=14 :Tn=4:Fl=3:F2=5 !F3=3:G=19:SP 

L=R:RBY=R:HLMT=H!PRL=R:L=124 0!LR=R 

6012 SHLD=R:TU=R:E0G=R:TM=R:0IL=R:GRY= 

R:VLU=R:UHT=R:BGN=R:CG=24:PUKE 559, 34 

6015 FOR J=l TO 3!B=INT CRND t8>»4J+l:B= 

B»«2:B = B + L:flScB,B>= L = L+40:NEXT J : RE 

TURN 

6020 I1SG3S = " 

6025 POSITION 2.6 = ? «»6; "PRESS [flaiiOtOIB F 

OR":POSITION 4,8!? tt6;"RaND0n KEV5"!P 

OSITION 8.10:? *t6 ; KEV $ CS . 5> 

6030 POSITION 4,16:? «6;"0R @(Jl[j1[!i(^ \\\!m\" 

:POSITION 6,18:? »6;"T0 BEGIN"!POKE 76 

4, R 

6035 IF PEEKC53279J=3 THEN U=4:G0T0 

50 

6040 

6045 

6050 



• yyyy y y y 
, y y , y y »» y . 

y-y/y,y.yy 
* y y y , y y , y y y 
y-yyyy,y y - y , y y , j 
y - y y * y y * 
y y , y y y » y y y 
y , y y y y tt y y 

yyy,-y,y-,y 
y y y y y y y 



y y y y , y 
y y-as 



60 



IF PEEKC764>=33 THEN RETURN 

GOTO 6035 

ftSc370,370J= ftSC3553, 35531=" " 

!flSC3713, 37131= ftSc2990.2990>=" " 

6055 FOR J = S TO 7 : D < J> =H <U» : H=M + 2 = NEXT 

J 
6060 FOR J=S TO 5 

6062 L=INTCRNDC0>M7>+S:IF DcL>=R THEN 
6062 
6064 KV=DtL»*21 

6066 KY = KY + INTCRNDC0J»«1B» : KY = KY + 20»INT 
cRND C8iw21> 

6067 IF ftScKV,KV> OCHRSC321 OH ftStKV-2 
0,KV-20J=CHRS C45> OR flS CKY+20 , KV+20> =C 
HR$C44) THEN 6062 

6068 IF ftS tKV+S,KY+S>=CHRScl70> OR ftSC 
KY-S,KY-S>=CHRS tl70J THEN 6062 

6070 ns tKY,KY>=KEYScJ, J» !FOR DE=-10 TO 
10:SOUND R.144,10,10-nBSCDE> :5aUND S. 

96,10,10-ftBScDE> iNEXT DE 

6071 COLOR 32!PL0T J+7,10:IF J=2 THEN 
J = 3 

6072 DcL>=R:NEXT J:RETURN 
31000 JNK=USR CADR c"hhaE1ha[3ha(Tlhnnha[i]ha[i1 

innQenQDsaarDnQiaunEiamiaBiiissiis"! , xsr. xds. 

XCNTi : RETURN 

MAY 1989 



ON 

JN 
GX 
PS 



EO 

IJ 
PR 

UO 

RD 

PY 

TH 
UB 

MY 
KB 
PU 

LM 

BO 
YC 

DM 

BK 

riM 



CM 

UO 

OR 
PU 
RL 

KM 
RM 



OX 
NA 
MY 
ET 
PJ 
CP 
UI 
SM 
UO 
SA 
MF 
NP 
flO 
AX 



10 

2 
20 
30 
35 
115 

LI 
40 
OTH 
50 
60 
EEK 
70 
AME 
80 
5 

90 
581 
100 
110 
TIC 
120 
130 
140 
se 
150 
C = l 
160 
170 
2,2 
180 
wn ■ 
190 
l:N 
200 
MAN 
E! " 
210 

LI 
220 
sse 
230 
240 
250 



REM THE SECRET OF KVOBU DI, LISTING 



REM BY 
REM cc 
REM c 
0-1160 
STING 
REM CL 
ER BAS 
REM CH 
DIM FN 
C10592 
FNS="D 
OF TH 

? "srai 



BERNARD T 
J 1985,198 
CREATES LI 
, 1226-123 
1 1 

INES 10-25 
IC LOADERS 
ANGE LINE 
S t20» ,TEMP 
1 :POKE 105 
:LINES.L5T 
E DISK FIL 
sk or [Sass 



AYLOR 

9 ANTIC PUBLISHING 
NES 305-310, 1105, 
6, 1254 & 31000 FOR 

MAY BE USED MITH 

IN THIS ISSUE. 
70 AS NECESSARY.! 
SC2 0>,ARSC93> :DPL = P 
92 , 25 5 

":REM THIS IS THE N 
E TO BE CREATED 
ette?"; :POKE .764,25 



IF NOT CPEEKC764>=18 OR PEEKc764J= 

THEN 90 

IF PEEKC764>=18 THEN FNS="C!" 

POKE 764,255 :GRAPHICS 0:? " AN 
■S GENERIC BASIC LOADER" 

? ."BY CHARLES JACKSON" 

POKE 10592. DPL:TRAP 200 

? :? :? "Creating ";FNS:? "...piea 
stand by." 

RESTORE :READ LN:LM=LN:DIM ASCLNJ: 



ARS="":READ ARS 

FOR X=l TO LENCARS) STEP 3:P0KE 75 
55 

LM=LM-l:P0SITI0N 10,10:? "CCountdo 
. .T-";INT CLM-'IOJ ; "J 

ASCC.C»=CHRSCUALCARSCX,X+2JJ>:C=C+ 
EXT X:GOTO 160 

IF PEEKtl95>=5 THEN ? :? :? "QTOO 
Y DATA LINES!"!? "CANNOT CREATE FIL 
! END 

IF C<LN+1 THEN ? :? "QTOO FEW DATA 
NES!":? "CANNOT CREATE FILE!"!END 

IF FNS="C!" THEN ? :? " Prepare ca 
tte, press (RETURN!" 

OPEN »1,8,0,FNS 

POKE 766,1:? t*l; A$; :POKE 766,0 

CLOSE ttl: GRAPHICS 0:? "■[amSDGlBSDSQlB 



1000 
1010 
8308 
1651 
1020 
0420 
0292 
1030 
0801 
0010 
1040 
4408 
0400 
1050 
0825 
2031 
1060 
4105 
0490 
1070 
3604 
0410 
1080 
5604 
0480 
1090 
3400 
0000 
1100 
4904 
0560 

1110 

8621 
0240 
1120 
2800 
0000 
1130 
0800 
0490 
1140 
3410 
1891 
1150 
0000 
0601 



DATA 11 

DATA 05 
20400650 
06056229 

DATA 21 
10012400 
08224046 

DATA 20 
21691281 
24101213 

DATA 21 
30411550 
65068082 

DATA 16 
12302042 
92255208 

DATA 05 
80800790 
48053032 

DATA 07 
00490490 
44084079 

DATA 04 
10440880 
36040055 

DATA 05 
60120270 
00008042 

DATA 00 
90530480 
53041061 

DATA 09 
41080560 
05016146 

DATA 23 
71280962 
00000000 

DATA 25 
80080080 
54048032 

DATA 04 
60861860 
26013126 

DATA 18 
00151261 
02102102 



67 

1048 

6808 

2071 

3104 

0216 

2400 

5133 

3320 

1332 

2096 

5104 

0400 

6206 

0220 

2490 

8069 

7506 

0680 

2071 

4104 

0820 

1044 

8007 

0410 

7050 

5510 

0280 

0000 

3206 

0340 

5082 

1600 

1862 

8006 

2404 

0000 

4146 

0802 

0670 

0056 

6000 

1892 

9126 

8921 

1020 



053032080 
204003410 
410072121 
104141111 
204614204 
141690001 
203169005 
513320316 
041690001 
034041044 
904803208 
341041690 
240012160 
824616420 
960340410 
084061090 
903205505 
730770320 
036040052 
408708007 
360400500 
084079082 
603604005 
440800360 
041058087 
219612800 
540280420 
050031050 
708306908 
010000320 
837686809 
406612609 
541460841 
000028062 
802401200 
000090001 
1301OBOOO 
801100006 
830690840 
054044049 
001212618 
192552552 
014000800 
925525521 
600000582 



0770660610850 

4104104133207 

33 

0021620621041 

7002169003141 

33 

1332061690032 

9002133206169 

33 

0490540440510 

5061085083082 

0001452032002 

5240007136145 

41 

0840400820870 

5044082155049 

67 

0480410440680 

8036040050056 

53 

0500360400520 

5050041044080 

40 

0800780360610 

2255002000000 

08 

0000000341550 

4036040049044 

82 

8031241302141 

0102090102060 

24 

0580580580540 

6003008000000 

24 

0560100280080 

0086034155049 

36 

0550490410610 

9219255255219 

19 

0000000000000 

9189126016080 

52 

continued on next page 

49 



XN 
VL 
DS 
HK 
BR 
ZJ 
US 
IH 
SR 
PT 
Qfl 
IL 



Ilea DATA 12619106419 
686 001261228520240608 
237897863061000800062 
1178 DATA 86282800803 
320 84 0790828360610 341 
203104133287104133206 
1180 DATA 17720614520 
96034 0580830768610658 
83604115504 9050058855 
1190 DATA 07988285883 
0012 603 6 024 824888080 
08 0000 000 08812603 6024 
1200 DATA 11610400012 
9200 0126036024824 8208 
824834858883876849061 
1210 DATA 08284888407 
490500500560328670720 
800255008000088000000 
1220 DATA 00025500025 
0888888882812618 92192 
18919521921919518912 6 
1238 DATA 08387685186 
72871836841155 84 98580 
034104104133213104133 
1240 DATA 20823021323 
3320410413 32 31041041 
00820610410420100124 8 
1250 DATA 80114402724 
4081916912813 32122 880 
80024 00 052 30213202208 
1268 DATA 10413328910 
32 302081642 914 52122 
8 34155 04 90500510500 32 
1270 DATA 07603606103 



12378978638590000 
60063065130065191 
085107 HA 

41550490508580540 
04104133204104133 
160008 DU 

32001920082062470 
68082848084079082 
032884 IX 

6061034 0000000000 
00808126836024824 
024040 MO 

60360240241160400 
46116000126036024 
065068 LE 

9882858836 8411558 
71836861834126255 
888000 UZ 

51260288888880880 
55255189219126126 
834058 MK 

18650680820400670 
50057032088836861 
212133 KR 

02131041041701041 
57000206184184157 
818224 GU 

88 062302132240022 
1323021323 0213224 
251184 ER 

41841701642081772 
30209202288241096 
088088 AS 

4 88888 8036 0240608 



288008000000160388988528 82084 088832009 

044086853858167818001076186 

1288 DATA 8940531268308768018811280160 

04 0018 64 8 32 881876186894 853126830076080 

1242 5414 6130188000056000000 

1290 DATA 8081271270000000000000000000 

16016000000008034 058083076050061065868 

8204 00888880 76036 041155 04 9 

1308 DATA 0580510548320820660898368618 

34 0800800000000568 84 056816800800040066 

856124 856816146884 040130056 

1310 DATA 1248561460000000800008568848 

56816880000 04886885612405601614688484 8 

13 8 856124 8 5614 6 034 05808 38 76 

1328 DATA 0520616650680820400828668890 

36 04115504 9056853852832685061685683882 

84 88650688 82 04 00 34104104133 

1330 DATA 2041641332831841332061041332 

510410413 320 716000016620624 0014177203 

06920 714 520320 028624 7238284 

1348 DATA 2022062421662852468181772838 

6 928714 520328 828228 824 6696 0340410448 65 

6686 62 84 6877083071050836641 

1358 DATA 8448?6869878e4687788387105e0 

36041044 05304105808206988488 5082876832 

15565184 904 804 884 8632674 878 

1368 DATA 0750610858838820400650680828 

4003418418413324118413324818413 3213104 

13 32121841332391841332 38168 

1376 DATA 8681772461452122302122888822 

3621323024 02 0808 2236241198238288234198 

239616 2308 968 34041044 8 888 3 

1366 DATA 8826448888686830440888676788 

84641058882869884065882678832155 




SOFTWARE, ETC. 



MAKE MONEY STUFFING ENVELOPES. How 
many can you fill for $1 each? Earn more with 
a PC. Send SASE to Suburban Enterprises, FOB 
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ENJOY quality public domain software! 
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Applications software for XL/XE or ST! Busi- 
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FORMS GENERATOR, the top-selling 
800/XL/XE program, now available for distri- 
bution by qualifying dealers and groups. Con- 
tact: 25th Century, Box 8042, Hicksville, r^ 

11802, (516) 932-5330 (5/89) 

COLOR PRINT GRAPHICS LIBRARY DISKS for 
The Printshop create unique two color designs. 
Requires color ribbons. Two disk set 811.95, 
plus S2 S & H for 8 bit. SASE for information. 
WJA SOFTWARE, 26 Hunters Lane, Hender- 
sonville, NC 28739 



****** 
BATTERY BACKED UP RAMDISK. Never 
lose your memory. Boot from Ramdisk! No 
installation. Ramdisk cartridge plugs into Atari 
400/800 or XL/XE. 32K $99.95, 64K S129.95, 
192K $249.95 Certified check, Money order, 
VISA accepted. CANOE COMPUTER SERV- 
ICES, 11006-155 St. Edmonton, AB, T5P-2N3 
Phone (403) 437-4619 

****** 

Save on ATARI 800/XL/XE Public Domain and 
Shareware software! Over 200 very unique 
Theme Disks. Every program guaranteed! 
Dependable world-wide service. Write for Free 
descriptive Catalog. BELLCOM, Box 1043-A, 
Peterborough, Ontario, Canada K9J 7A5 (5/89) 
STOP! LOOK! $4,000/month with computers. 
Homebased. Proven. No experience/capital. 
Guaranteed. Free details. MacKenzie, Box 
91181— LCC, Pasadena CA 91109 (5/89) 

****** 
Stop overpaying for P.D. Software!!! ALL 8-bit 
disks only $2.00 each, ST only $3. 00. Quan- 
tity discounts, great selection. Specify com- 
puter Send large SASE: MWPDS, 890 N. 
Huntington St., Medina, OH 44256 (5/89) 



****** 
Si's Fantastic Selection of packed ATARI 8-bit 
(D-S)/ST PD Theme Disks is Far SUPERIOR to 
all other collections we've seen— TRY US! Send 
for MLX GAMES'GREATEST HITS (our Most 
Popular title), plus Si's newest catalog, for 
8-bit/S 3 .00 or ST/$4 .50. Catalog alone (specify 
system)/$2.00. SOFTWARE INFINITY, 642 East 
Waring Avenue, State College, PA 16801 (5/89) 

Try us for your Atari Public Domain software 
needs. Good prices, fast service. Write for free 
catalog. Vulcan Software, PO Box 692 
Manassas, VA 22111-0692(7/89) 

SynFile-i- UTILITY PROGRAMS. Print file lay- 
out, create and save reports, undelete records, 
alter look-up tables, etc. $19.95 plus $2.00 
P&H. Send large SASE for more info. SEP, 4 
Forest Drive, Palmyra, VA 22963 (5/89) 
250 -H DS/SD DISKS OF PD SOFTWARE FOR 
THE 8-BIT ATARI. SEND $3 TO: AAPDS 
6-18TH EDGEMOORE, HUTCHINSON, KS 
67506 (5/89) 



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AN AD IN ANTIC REACHES MORE THAN 100,000 SERIOUS ATARI USERS 



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Tech Tips 



DEFAULTWRITER+ COMPANIONS 1 & 2 

BY PAUL ALHART 

These short BASIC programs let you control the de- 
fault buzzer settings for AtariWriter+ and the 
AtariWriter + Proofreader. DefaultWriter will only 
Avork with the 48K versions of these programs. 

DefaultWriter Companion #1 (DWCl.BAS) lets you 
disable that annoying buzzer w^hen you start the 
program. The effect is the same as typing [CON- 
TROL] [B] from the main menu, and you can still 
use [CONTROL] [B] to turn the buzzer on and off. 

As a bonus, you can also change the duration of 
the buzzer with Companion #1. Even with the 
buzzer disabled, it will still sound when certain 
selections (like FORMAT) are made. The duration 
can be set to for complete silence, or up to a set- 
ting of 255. The normal setting is 32. 

DefaultWriter Companion #2 (DWC2.BAS) lets 
you change the buzzer default for the AtariWriter + 
PROOFREADER program. An added option lets you 
turn off the ARE YOU SURE (Y/N) prompt that fol- 
lows a spelling correction. Proofreader will still 
check your new spelling against the dictionary, but 
you won't have to type Y after entering the word. 

These t^vo Companions will work on your origi- 
nal AtariWriter + Disk — as did my original 
DefaultWriter + {Antic, July 1988) which lets you 
pre-program two different sets of defaults for in- 
stant loading. However, to be on the safe side, you 
should make one or two backup copies of your 
original AtariWriter + disk, put the original disk in 
a safe place, and only work with the copies. 



LISTING 1 



Don't type the 
TYPO II Codes! 



RH 

EP 
QR 
LP 

FO 

un 

DC 
RJ 



REn nTARIURITER DEFAULTURITER cCOMPR 
ION »li 
REM BY 
REM cc: 

? "M Tf 
BUi 
? "fitaf 
"7 : o 



ter + 

IF PEE 
e TRAP 
5 CLOSE 
E »1, Q 



POOL 
J1988 
his P 
ZZER 
riMr i 

Inse 
diSK 
KC532 
ieB:D 

«1 ! 

W!S1 = 



U. nLHRRT 
, ANTIC PUBLISHING 
roaran lets you chan 
Default settings for 
ter+ t48K Uersioni." 
rt a copy of uour At 
and press ■tHiill-IUik IB " ■ 7 
79><>6 THEN 8 
IM INStlJ 

PEN »1, 12. 8, "D : OP . OB 
Q+105:S2=Q*122:B1=22 



ge th 



: ? 

a r i U r 



QE 

EH 
TR 
UB 

QP 



C5 
UB 



flV 
GJ 



29 POINT «l.Sl,Bl!GET wi^flsPOINT «1,52 

,B2:GET «»1,B:IF ft<>0 AND A0255 THEN 9 

8 

38 ? ■•NThe Default Buzzer setting is " 

;A:? ■■ = OFF 255 = ON" 

40 ? !? "Buzzer Duration is set at ";B 

;" JIFFIES"!? •■ NORMAL = 32" 

50 ? :? "Do uou want to change these s 

ettings t V^ N> ";= INPUT INSsIF INS<>"Y" 

THEN CLOSE «1 = END 
60 ? :? !? "Tupe or 255 for Buzzer D 
efault" : INPUT A:IF AO0 AND A0255 THE 
N 60 

70 ? "Tupe Buzzer Durat i on" : INPUT B 
80 POINT «l,Sl,Bl:PUT «1,A!P0INT M1.S2 
,B2:PUT »1,B:G0T0 20 

98 CLOSE «l!? "USE WITH 48K VERSION ON 
LVQ" 
100 CLOSE «1 ! ? "ERROR ";PEEKC195> 



LISTING 2 



CN 

EP 
QR 
MG 

PJ 

ME 

DC 
RJ 
IR 

GH 

IC 
TR 
RL 
MB 

AR 



CS 
TJ 



UO 



SI 
CA 



GJ 



1 REM 
NION 

2 REM 

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4 ? " 
e 

5 ? " 
DER 

? ? : 

t]ir:ii:iiia 

8 IF 
10 TR 
15 CL 
E «1, 
7 ! B2 = 
28 PO 
, 02: G 
F CO 
30 ? 



48 



45 



7 
7 

JI 

7 

32 
58 ? 
ett i n 
THEN 
68 ? 
Def a 
THEN 
78 ? 
75 ? 
INPUT 
88 PO 
-B2:P 
85 GO 
90 CL 
VQ" 
108 C 



PROO 
«2> 
BY P 
ct Jl 

Sis Thi 
BUZZ 

CY/-N> 
C48K 

? " I 

PEEKc 
AP 10 
USE « 
a,M:S 
121 :B 
INT « 
ET »1 
32 AN 
"■^1 he 

: 7 "B 
FFIES 

:? "T 
- ON 

: 7 "D 

gs t 

CLOS 
: 7 : 7 

Ul t" ! 

68 
"Tupe 
"Type 

C!lF 
INT M 
UT «1 
TO 20 
USE « 



FREADER DEF AULTMRITER cCOMPA 



AUL U. ALHART 
988. ANTIC PUBLISH] 
s Progran lets you 
ER Default setting: 

ProMPt settings ol 

ONLY! >" 
nsert your disk and press Htrl 



IING 

change th 
IS and the" 
If PRUOFREA 



5327 
0! DI 
1 : OP 
1 = + 
3 = 35 
1. 51 
. B : P 
D C< 
Def 
208 
uzze 
• ■ : 7 

he c 

o yo 
Y'-NJ 
E «1 
"Ty 
INPU 



9106 THEN 8 
M INSCIJ 
EN ««1.12. 0. "D : 
27 : S2 = Q + 27 = S3 = 



, 01 
OIN 
>96 
au 1 
= 
I- D 

V/'N 
96 
u w 

:EN 
pe 
T A 



: GET 
T «1 
THE 
t Bu 
FF 

urat 
NO 
> Pr 
= OF 
ant 
INPU 
D 

288 
:1F 



»1 . A : P 
. 53. 03 : 
N 90 
zzer se 
248 = 
ion is 
RMAL = 
OMPt i s 
F" 

t u Chan 
T INS : I 

or 248 
A< >288 



Buzzer Duration": 

32 or 96 for cY^N 

C<>32 AND C096 T 

l,Sl.Bl:POT ol.A:P 

.B:POINT «1,S3.B3: 

1 : ? 



PROOF" :NUT 
0+38 : 81 = 11 

OINT nl,S2 
GET UI.C: I 

tt i ng is " 

ON ■ 
set at ";B 
32" 

" ; C : ? " 

ge these s 
F IN$<>"Y" 

for Buzzer 
AND A0248 

INPOT B 
> Pr OMPt" : 
HEN 75 
OINI ttl.S2 
PUT «1,C 



USE FOR 48K UERSION ONL 
LOSE «l:? "ERROR ";PEEKC195> 



J": NO 
:B2 = 8 



Antic pays $25 for every original and exclusive Tech 
Tip submission that we publish. Send your 8-bit or ST 
disk and printout to-. Antic Tech Tips, 544 Second 
Street, San Francisco, CA 94107- Tech Tips welcomes 
very short programs that demonstrate the Atari's 
powers, simple hardware modifications, or useful 
macros for popular software. 



52 



ANTIC, Till- ATARI RESOURCE 



ComputerVisions 



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Santa Clara, CA 95051 
(408) 749-1003 



A 



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TUE - FRI 10am - 6pm 

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soo/ x: r^/ X E softw .^ re 

ALL TITLES ON DISK 



;^5^ 



ENTERTAINMENT 

12 ADAMS ADVENTURES .. 14.95 

ALIANTS 26.95 

ALT. REALITY CITY 26.95 

ALT. REALITY DUNGEON. 26.95 

BEYOND CASTLE WOLF.... 14.95 

BISMARK 26.95 

BOP s WRESTLE (64K)... 26.95 

BORDINO:I312 26.95 

BOULDERDASH CONSTR.SET 17.95 

BRUCE LEE 17.95 

CASTLE WOLFENSTEIN. . . . 14.95 

DALLAS QUEST 7.95 

D-BUG 7.95 

F-15 STRIKE EAGLE .... 31.50 

FIGHT NIGHT 17.95 

GAUNTLET (64K) 31.50 

DEEPER DUNGEONS 22.50 

GUNSLINGER 26.95 

HARD HAT MAC 7.95 

JAWBREAKER 9.95 

KARATEKA 13.50 

KNICKERBOCKERS 13.50 

KORONIS RIFT 13.50 

LAST V-3 8.95 

LEADERBOARD 13.50 

MAIL ORDER MONSTERS .. 13.50 

MICROLEAGUE BASEBALL.. 35.95 

MONTEZUMA'S REVENGE... 14.95 

MOUSEQUEST 17.95 

MOON SHUTTLE 7.95 

NINJA 8.95 

OIL'S WELL 9.95 

O'RILEY'S MINE 9.95 

PIRATES OF BARB. COAST 22.50 

PREPPIE I s II 9.95 

RESCUE ON FRACTALAS... 13.50 

SILENT SERVICE 31.50 

SPEEDKING 8.95 

SPIDERMAN 7.95 

SPITFIRE 40 31.50 

STARFLEET I 44.95 

SPY VS. SPY III 17.95 

STOCKMARKET 22.50 

STRIP POKER 26.95 

SUMMER GAMES 17.95 

TAX DODGE 9.95 

THE HULK 7.95 

TOMAHAWK (64K) 26.95 

TOP GUNNER 17.95 

TOUCHDOWN FOOTBALL ... 13.50 

TRAILBLAZER 26.95 

UNIVERSE 44.95 

ZAXXON 13.50 

PROGRAMMING 

ACTION! 71.95 

ACTION! TOOLKIT 26.95 

BASIC XL 53.95 

BASIC XL TOOLKIT 26.95 

BASIC XE 71.95 

DISK I/O 26.95 

DRAPER PASCAL 44.95 

KYAN PASCAL 62.95 

LIGHTSPEED C 35.95 

LOGO 29.95 

MAC/65 71.95 

MAC/65 TOOLKIT 26.95 

MACROASSEMBLER 22.50 

PILOT 19.95 

SPARTA DOS X 71.95 

TOP DOS 1.5 PLUS 35.95 

PRODUCTIVITY 

ANIMATION STATION .... 89.95 

ATARIWRITER+ 39.95 

ATARI BOOKKEEPER 24.95 



SOO/ X: E/ X: E SOFT^VyVRE 

ALL TITLES ON CARTRIDGE 



ATARI MUSIC II 14.95 

AWARDWARE (1050) 13.50 

BANK STREET WRITER.... 14.95 

BLAZING PADDLES 31.50 

CELEBRITY COOKBOOK ... 26.95 

COMPUTE YOUR ROOTS ... 35.95 

DATAMANAGER 17.95 

FAMILY FINANCE 6.95 

GUITAR WIZARD 26.95 

HOME ACCOUNTANT 19.95 

HOME FILING MANAGER. . 6.95 

HOMEPAK 24.95 

INVENTORY MASTER 80.95 

LETTER WIZARD 29.95 

MUSIC CONSTRUCTION SET 13.50 

NEWSROOM (1050 - 64K) . 13.50 

NEWS STATION 2 6.95 

NEWS STA. COMPANION. . 2 6.95 

PAGE DESIGNER 26.95 

PRINT POWER (1050).... 13.50 

PRINTKIT (1050) 13.50 

PRINTSHOP 34.95 

P.S. COMPANION (64K) . 24.95 

P.S.GRAPHICS LIBRARY 1 17.95 

P.S.GRAPHICS LIBRARY 2 17.95 

P.S.GRAPHICS LIBRARY 3 17.95 

PROOF READER 17.95 

PUBLISHING PRO 35.95 

RUBBER STAMP 26.95 

SYNTREND 14.95 

SUPER MAILER 35.95 

THE LOTTO PROGRAM .... 17.95 

TIMEWISE 6.95 

TURBOWORD/80 COLUMN 

REQUIRES XEP80 44.95 

VIDEO TITLESHOP (64K) . 26.95 

GRAPHICS COMPANION. 17.95 

VIRTUOSO 29.95 

VISICALC 24.95 

EDUCATION 

ATARI LIGHT MODULE 
(REQ.ATARILAB STARTER) 9.95 

BUZZWORD 35.95 

GRANDMA'S HOUSE (-10) 9.95 
HEY DIDDLE (AGE 3-10). 9.95 

MASTER TYPE 14.95 

PLANATARIUM 22.50 

STATES AND CAPITALS .. 9.95 

TOUCH TYPING 9.95 

CBS (AGE 3-6) : 

ASTROGROVER 8.95 

BIG BIRD SPEC DELIVE 8.95 
ERNIE'S MAGIC SHAPE. 8.95 
DESIGNHARE: 

MATHMAZE (6-11) .... 35.95 
MISSION ALGEBRA (13+)35.95 
SPELLICOPTER (6-11). 35.95 
TINK TONK (AGE 4-6) : 

ABC'S 8.95 

COUNT AND ADD 8.95 

SMART THINKER 8.95 

SPELLING 8.95 

SUBTRACTION 8.95 

THINKING SKILLS .... 8.95 
ALL 6 TINK TONKS.. 39.95 
UNICORN: 

10 LITTLE ROBOTS 

(PRE-SCHOOL) 26.95 

FUN BUNCH (6-ADULT) 26.95 
RACECAR RITHMETIC 

(AGE 6 + ) 26.95 

WEEKLY READER (PRE-SCHOOL) : 
STICKY BEAR SHAPES . 26.95 
STICKY BEAR NUMBERS. 26.95 
STICKY BEAR ABC'S .. 26.96 
STICKY BEAR OPPOSITE 26.95 



ENTERTAINMENT 

ALIEN AMBUSH 9.95 

ACE OF ACES . (XL/XE) . 24.95 

ARCHON 19.95 

ASTEROIDS 15.95 

ATARI TENNIS 9.95 

BALL BLAZER 19.95 

BARNYARD BLASTER .... 24.95* 

BATTLEZONE 19.95 

BLUE MAX 19.95 

CAVERNS OF MARS 14.95 

CENTIPEDE 14.95 

CHICKEN 9.95 

CHOPLIFTER 14.95 

CLAIM JUMPER 9.95 

CLOUDBURST 9.95 

CRIME BUSTER 24.95* 

CROSSBOW 24.95* 

CROSSFIRE 9.95 

DAVIDS MIDNIGHT MAGIC 19.95 

DEFENDER 14.95 

DELUXE INVADERS 7.95 

DESERT FALCON 19.95 

DIG DUG 19.95 

DONKEY KONG 5.00 

DONKEY KONG JR 19.95 

EASTERN FRONT (1941). 19.95 

E.T. PHONE HOME 9.95 

FIGHT NIGHT 19.95 

FINAL LEGACY 19.95 

FOOD FIGHT (XL/XE)... 19.95 

FOOTBALL 14.95 

FROGGER 14.95 

GALAXIAN 19.95 

GATO 24.95 

GORF (400/800) 5.00 

GYRUSS 14.95 

HARDBALL 19.95 

INTO THE EAGLES NEST 19.95 

JOURNEY TO PLANETS .. 9.95 

JOUST 19.95 

JUNGLE HUNT 19.95 

KABOOM! 14.95 

LODE RUNNER 24.95 

MARIO BROS 19.95 

MILLIPEDE 19.95 

MISSILE COMMAND 5.00 

MOON PATROL 19.95 

MR. COOL 9.95 

MS. PAC MAN 19.95 

NECROMANCER 19.95 

ONE ON ONE (XL/XE)... 19.95 

PAC MAN 5.00 



PENGO 


19 
19 
14 
14 
14 
19 
14 
19 
14 

9 
14 

5 
19 

9 
24 

9 

5 


95 


POLE POSITION 

POPEYE 


.95 

as 


Q-BERT 


95 


QIX 


95 


RESCUE ON FRACTALAS . 
RETURN OF THE JEDI . . 

ROBOTRON:2084 

SKY WRITER 


95 
95 
95 

95 


SLIME (400/800) 

SPACE INVADERS 

STAR RAIDERS 

STAR RAIDERS II 

SUPER BREAKOUT 

TRACK S FIELD 

TURMOIL 


95 
95 
00 
95 
95 
95 
95 


WIZARD OF WOR 

* REQUIRES LIGHT GUN 


00 


PRODUCTIVI 

ATARIWRITER 


TY 

19 
22 


95 


MICROFILER 


50 



EDUCATION 

ATARILAB STARTEER SET 29.95 

MATH ENCOUNTERS 9.95 

FISHER PRICE (PRE SCHOOL) : 

DANCE FANTASY 8.95 

LINKING LOGIC 8.95 

LOGIC LEVELS 8 . 95 

MEMORY MANOR 8.95 

SPINNAKER (AGE 3-10) : 
ALF IN COLOR CAVES . 9.95 

ALPHABET ZOO 9.95 

DELTA DRAWING 9.95 

PACEMAKER 9.95 

KIDS ON KEYS 9.95 

KINDERCOMP 9.95 

(AGE 7 - ADULT) : 

ADV. CREATOR (400/800) . 9 . 95 
FRACTION FEVER 9.95 

THE BASIC TUTOR 

Learn to program in BASIC 

Requires a 410 OR 1010 Program Recorder 

COMPLETE PACKAGE ONLY $9.95 

BOOKS ONLY 

DE RE ATARI 10.00 

LOGO 10. 00 

ATARIWRITER 10.00 

DOS 2.5 12 . 95 

BASIC REFERENCE 5.00 

BOOKKEEPER 10.00 



1 RECONDITIONED ATARI MERCHANDISE 



30 DAY WARRANTY 



♦ 



800 (48K) 
COMPUTER 

$79.95 

400 (16K) 
COMPUTER 

$29.95 



1020 COLOR 
PRINTER/ PLOTTER 

$19.95 



40 COLUMNS WIDE 

(NEW IN BOX) 



SPACE AGE 

JOYSTICK 

$5.00 

ATARI 
TRACKBALL 

$9.95 



ATARI 
BOOKKEEPER 

$14.95 - NO BOX 

ATARI 

NUMERIC 
KEYPAD $7.95 



1030 MODEM 
WITH EXPRESS! 

$24.95 

1010 PROGRAM 

RECORDER 

$29.95 



DISKETTES 

AS LOW AS 20 CENTS 

10 FOR $4.00 

100 FOR $29.95 

1000 FOR $200 

MOST ARE UNNOTCHED 

WITH OLD SOFTWARE 



SHIPPING INFORMATION - Prices do not include shipping and handling. Add $5.00 for small items ($8.00 Min. for Canada). Add $8.00 for disk 
drive. Add $2.75 for C.O.D. Calif, res. include 7% sales tax. Ivlastercard and Visa accepted if your telephone is listed in your local phone directory. 
Orders may be pre-paid with money order, cashier check, or personal check. Personal checks are held for three weeks before order is processed. 
C.O.D orders are shipped via UPS and must be paid with cash, cashier check or money order. International and APO orders must be pre-paid with 
cashier checl< or money order. $20,00 minimum on all orders. All sales are final • no refunds • prices are subject to change. 

Phone orders accepted TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm PST. 

We carry a complete line of ATARI products and have a large public domain library. 
Write or call for free catalogue. (408) 749-1003 TUE - FRI 10AM - 6 PM 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE - ALL SALES ARE FINAL 



WE'RE BACK! 



SAN JOSE COMPUTER, THE ATARI STORE', is t±ie largest seller of ATARI 
products and now we're back in the 8-Bit market to serve you better. 



1200XL 



• 64KRAM 
• XE COMPATIBLE 



Reconditioned. 90 day warranty 



$49.95 1025 PRINTER $89.95 



Reconditioned, 90 day warranty 



COMPUTERS 

800 $69.95 

400 $29.95 

600XL $49.95 

Reconditioned, 90 day warranty 



MISCELLANEOUS 

850 INTERFACE $89.95 

MONO MONITOR ... $39.95 

TRACKBALL $9.95 

JOYSTICK 20' EXT. $ .99 

KccondiLioned, 90 day warranty 



F»i^j:iNn:^E:^i^s 



Reconditioned 
825 . 
1029 



$79.95 
$129.95 



RccoTidtf-loricd, '■X) day warranty 



Brand new In box! 

1027.;^.rtS:n?ct... $89.98 
1 020.. ^^«^r ...$18.98 
1020 plotter pins $ .98 



CARTRIDGES FOR 800, XL, XE 



BASIC CARTRIDGE $4.95 

QIX $4.95 

'lURMOIL $4.95 

I>AC-MAN (no box) $4.95 

DONKEY KONG (no box) $4.95 

GORF (400,800) $4.95 

DEMON ATTACK (400.800) $4.95 

DELUXE INVADERS $4.95 

JOURNEY TO THE PLANETS $4.95 

MATH ENCOUNTER $7.98 

SKY WRITER $14.95 

FOOTBALL . $1 4 95 

DEFENDER SI 4 95 



ROBOTRON $19.98 

TENNIS $19.98 

FINAL LEGACY $19.98 

MARIO BROS $19.98 

DONKEY KONG JR $19.98 

JUNGLE HUNT $19.98 

MOON PATROL $19.98 

BATTLEZONE $19.98 

FOOD FIGHT $19.98 

tL\RDBALL $19.98 

FIGHT NIGHT $19.98 

ONE ON ONE BASKETBALL $1 9 98 

DESER'I FALCON .. . $19 98 



NECROMANCER i $19.98 

RE.SCUE ON FRACTALUS $19.98 

BALLBLAZER $19.98 

BLUE MAX $19.98 

STAR RAIDERS II $19.98 

DAVID'S MIDNIGHT MAGIC $19.98 

ARCHON $19.98 

GATO $24.98 

ACE OF ACES $24.98 

LODE RUNNER $24.98 

BARNYARD BLASTER (XE gun) $24.98 

ATARI IJ\I3 LI(}I I r MODULE $29 98 

ATARI I^B SrrARTER KIT $39 98 



DISK SOFTWARE FOR 800, XL, XE 



DAVID'S MIDNIGHT MAGIC $4.98 

ZORRO $4.98 

BANDITS (48K 400.800) $4.98 

PROTECTOR II $4.98 

CLAIM JUMPER $4 98 

SYNTREND $4 98 



CROSSCHECK $4.98 

MOLECULE MAN $4.98 

CRYSTAL RAIDER $4.98 

DESPATCH RIDER $4.98 

MISSION ASTI<:R0ID $4 98 



SPIDERMAN $4.98 

HULK $4.98 

VISICALC $24.98 

BOOKKEEPER W/ numeric keypad $29 98 
GET RICH . . iW9 98 




BASIC TUI^OR .. (2 BOOKS) .. $4.98 
SERIAL 8-BIT I/O CABLE $5.95 



SAN JOSE COMPUTER 



THE 



ATARI 



STORE 



Sunrise Plaza 640 Blossom Hill Rd. San Jose, CA 95123 
(4(38)224-8575 • BBS (408) 224-0952 



5.25" DISKS 

20 CENTS EA.* 

QTY. PRICE 

10 $4.00 

100 .... $29.95 
*1000 .... $200 

MAJORTIY ARE UNNOTCHED 
CONTAINING OLD SOFTWARE 



SHIPPING: ADD $5.00 TO ALL ORDERS. AIR AND INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING EXTRA. 'IlIATS IT. 

WARRANTY: 90 DAY WARRANTY ON ALL ITEMS. TAX: CALIFORNIA RESIDENTS ADD 7% SALES TAX. 

PREPAYMENT: USE VISA, MASTERCARD. MONEY ORDER, CASHIER'S CHECK OR PER5OTNAI, CHECK. 

PERSONAL CHECK MUST CLEAR PRIOR TO SHIPMENT. C.O.D.: CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK OR M.O. ONLY 

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